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Science Playground now open to kids in Seoul

Category: Google | May 2, 2017

Starting this week, families visiting the Gwacheon National Science Museum in Seoul can drop by the new Science Playground to dabble in activities and experiments where the young—and young at heart—can get a glimpse of what it’s like to be a scientist or an engineer.

Have a look around the playground and some of the fun things you can learn to design and build here:

Science Playground 2

The newly-opened Science Playground at the Gwacheon National Science Museum

Science Playground

Intro to robotics with LEGO’s WeDo Construction Set

An introduction to robotics with LEGO’s WeDo Construction Set

Robotics with LEGO’s WeDo Construction Set

3D printing at the Science Playground in Seoul

3D printing in action

The “playground”—a beautiful light-filled glass structure with a fantastic view of the museum’s garden—offers four different programs throughout the week:

  • “Challenge! 3D Modeling” — try your hand at 3D printing
  • “PLAY Block Coding” — get an introduction to robotics with LEGO’s WeDo Construction Set
  • “Hello Coding” — this is a crash course on the Scratch programming language, and the principles behind algorithms and coding
  • “Mission Robotics!” — experience robotics engineering and problem-solving using a VEX IQ kit

Want to experience this for yourself? Check out the schedule and sign-up form here. Classes will be offered for free until the end of May; after that, it’s KRW5,000 (about 5 USD) per family.

Since the Children’s Makerspace opened last year, we’ve seen thousands of kids come up with creative ideas on what they can do with technology. Together with the new Science Playground—both of which were made possible through a partnership with the Gwacheon National Science Museum and a grant from Google.org—we’re excited to see what the kids will come up with next!

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/dEYF5MHIGQs/

Creating a professional growth culture: 3 lessons from school districts

Category: Google | May 1, 2017

Whether it’s a 3D printer, a language app, or a Chromebook on a student’s desk, technology represents potential. The results can be profound, but learning how to make the most of new tools often requires dedication outside of the standard school day.

We spoke with teachers and administrators at Cicero Public School District 99 in Illinois and Chagrin Falls Exempted Village Schools in Ohio about how they designed technology professional development programs to engage teachers for the long term. Here we share three lessons learned from their experiences building programs that impact educators and students alike.

Lesson 1: Incentives help overcome inertia

When the Cicero Public School District 99 board set the goal of giving every child access to a Chromebook, professional development for teachers became a top priority. CIO Cao Mac believed any tech rollout was bound to fail unless teachers got the right training. So his team came up with a plan to motivate teachers to get Google Certified—they’d offer them early access to new classroom devices.

The district now has 104 Google Certified Educators, and has seen a shift in how teachers use devices in the classroom. Before the training, students used laptops and tablets for activities like math games and music videos. Two months after the Chromebook rollout, the top five sites accessed across the district included Google Classroom, Google Docs and Khan Academy. “Right off the bat, they were no longer using their machines randomly,” Mac says. “Their use was more focused.”

Superintendent+StaffLincolnTrainingRoom.JPG

Lesson 2: Time is a precious resource

Chagrin Falls Exempted Village School District is the first public school district to train all of its teachers to become Google Certified Educators. Administrators say they achieved 100 percent participation by customizing the program around teachers’ schedules.

“We made it easy for teachers get certified whenever it was most convenient,” says Nancy Kevern, a technology integration and instructional coach at Chagrin Falls Exempted Village Schools. “Grouping teachers by grade level helped us emphasize the lessons they would find most useful.”

The district also started a committee that works on solutions for fitting professional development into teachers’ busy schedules. They’ve proposed incorporating trainings into the school day—for instance, by delaying student start times.

Lesson 3: Community makes a movement

Cicero Public School District 99 took a grassroots approach to training its teachers. A group of technology resource teachers actively recruited teachers to get certified, leveraging their relationships to build a team of early adopters. This group influenced the rest of the district.

“We knew if these ambassadors were on board, their friends would be, too,” Mac says. “Adoption needs to happen teacher by teacher, grade by grade.”

This momentum has led Cicero Public School District 99 to extend its 1:1 Chromebook program to grades K-8. None of this would have been possible without support from teachers and the entire district.

This isn’t my initiative,” Mac says. “This is the village of Cicero’s initiative. This is ours.

Cao Mac

CIO at Cicero Public School District 99

Professional development is about more than introducing new tools. By helping educators develop the skills and confidence to grow professionally, school districts are investing in their students and building cultures that embrace technology. “It doesn’t matter how many devices you have,” Mac says. “If you don’t know how to integrate technology with teaching, it becomes just another add on.”

Visit the Training Center to learn more about the Google for Education certification programs. And if you’re a district interested in help from a Certified Professional Development Partner, learn more here.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/ZGbi_EC5IKE/

Creating a professional growth culture: 3 lessons from school districts

Category: Google | May 1, 2017

Whether it’s a 3D printer, a language app, or a Chromebook on a student’s desk, technology represents potential. The results can be profound, but learning how to make the most of new tools often requires dedication outside of the standard school day.

We spoke with teachers and administrators at Cicero Public School District 99 in Illinois and Chagrin Falls Exempted Village Schools in Ohio about how they designed technology professional development programs to engage teachers for the long term. Here we share three lessons learned from their experiences building programs that impact educators and students alike.

Lesson 1: Incentives help overcome inertia

When the Cicero Public School District 99 board set the goal of giving every child access to a Chromebook, professional development for teachers became a top priority. CIO Cao Mac believed any tech rollout was bound to fail unless teachers got the right training. So his team came up with a plan to motivate teachers to get Google Certified—they’d offer them early access to new classroom devices.

The district now has 104 Google Certified Educators, and has seen a shift in how teachers use devices in the classroom. Before the training, students used laptops and tablets for activities like math games and music videos. Two months after the Chromebook rollout, the top five sites accessed across the district included Google Classroom, Google Docs and Khan Academy. “Right off the bat, they were no longer using their machines randomly,” Mac says. “Their use was more focused.”

Superintendent+StaffLincolnTrainingRoom.JPG

Lesson 2: Time is a precious resource

Chagrin Falls Exempted Village School District is the first public school district to train all of its teachers to become Google Certified Educators. Administrators say they achieved 100 percent participation by customizing the program around teachers’ schedules.

“We made it easy for teachers get certified whenever it was most convenient,” says Nancy Kevern, a technology integration and instructional coach at Chagrin Falls Exempted Village Schools. “Grouping teachers by grade level helped us emphasize the lessons they would find most useful.”

The district also started a committee that works on solutions for fitting professional development into teachers’ busy schedules. They’ve proposed incorporating trainings into the school day—for instance, by delaying student start times.

Lesson 3: Community makes a movement

Cicero Public School District 99 took a grassroots approach to training its teachers. A group of technology resource teachers actively recruited teachers to get certified, leveraging their relationships to build a team of early adopters. This group influenced the rest of the district.

“We knew if these ambassadors were on board, their friends would be, too,” Mac says. “Adoption needs to happen teacher by teacher, grade by grade.”

This momentum has led Cicero Public School District 99 to extend its 1:1 Chromebook program to grades K-8. None of this would have been possible without support from teachers and the entire district.

This isn’t my initiative,” Mac says. “This is the village of Cicero’s initiative. This is ours.

Cao Mac

CIO at Cicero Public School District 99

Professional development is about more than introducing new tools. By helping educators develop the skills and confidence to grow professionally, school districts are investing in their students and building cultures that embrace technology. “It doesn’t matter how many devices you have,” Mac says. “If you don’t know how to integrate technology with teaching, it becomes just another add on.”

Visit the Training Center to learn more about the Google for Education certification programs. And if you’re a district interested in help from a Certified Professional Development Partner, learn more here.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/1oWC-MhrwLo/

This National Small Business Week, build your online skills with lessons from the pros

Category: Google | May 1, 2017

The web is helping small businesses grow. As the place where people turn to learn, discover, find, and buy things, it’s connecting customers to small businesses and small businesses to customers. Being online can have a big impact–in fact, businesses that are online grow 40 percent faster and are twice as likely to create new jobs than those that remain offline.

We see the power of the web working for American small businesses. Millions of small businesses are found on Google Search and Maps every single day across the nation.

With a little bit of elbow grease and the help of technology, we believe every business can grow online. So together with our partners, we’re continuing our mission to help make that happen. Through our Get Your Business Online initiative, we’re bringing together free resources and tools to help you this National Small Business Week and beyond.

Learn from the pros through bite-sized lessons

Build your online business and marketing skills with five-minute lessons from Primer, our free mobile app. To celebrate National Small Business Week, we’re happy to announce new lessons created by small business experts Anita Campbell, John Jantsch, Ramon Ray, and Rhonda Abrams. Each has created a special lesson from their decades of experience working with and coaching small businesses. We’re also excited to share new web-based lessons.

Get your business online

Be where your customers are. Get your free listing on Google Search and Maps.  Show pictures of your business, list your hours, and add your phone number so customers can just click to call you or get directions. Businesses with complete listings are considered twice as reputable. Use this handy tool to get started.

Make sure your website works on mobile

Did you know that more than half of all Google searches happen on mobile phones? Mobile shoppers want quick results–53 percent say they’ll wait no more than three seconds before abandoning a site. How fast does your website load? Use the free Test My Site tool to see how well your site works on mobile. We’ll email you a personalized assessment with specific recommendations on how to make it better.

Want even more?

During National Small Business Week (and throughout the year), Google and our partners are hosting in-person workshops to help you grow your business online. Find a workshop near you.

Small businesses are the heart of our communities. Thank you for making the places we call home, home.

Happy National Small Business Week.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/1fZyys_iKn8/

This National Small Business Week, build your online skills with lessons from the pros

Category: Google | May 1, 2017

The web is helping small businesses grow. As the place where people turn to learn, discover, find, and buy things, it’s connecting customers to small businesses and small businesses to customers. Being online can have a big impact–in fact, businesses that are online grow 40 percent faster and are twice as likely to create new jobs than those that remain offline.

We see the power of the web working for American small businesses. Millions of small businesses are found on Google Search and Maps every single day across the nation.

With a little bit of elbow grease and the help of technology, we believe every business can grow online. So together with our partners, we’re continuing our mission to help make that happen. Through our Get Your Business Online initiative, we’re bringing together free resources and tools to help you this National Small Business Week and beyond.

Learn from the pros through bite-sized lessons

Build your online business and marketing skills with five-minute lessons from Primer, our free mobile app. To celebrate National Small Business Week, we’re happy to announce new lessons created by small business experts Anita Campbell, John Jantsch, Ramon Ray, and Rhonda Abrams. Each has created a special lesson from their decades of experience working with and coaching small businesses. We’re also excited to share new web-based lessons.

Get your business online

Be where your customers are. Get your free listing on Google Search and Maps.  Show pictures of your business, list your hours, and add your phone number so customers can just click to call you or get directions. Businesses with complete listings are considered twice as reputable. Use this handy tool to get started.

Make sure your website works on mobile

Did you know that more than half of all Google searches happen on mobile phones? Mobile shoppers want quick results–53 percent say they’ll wait no more than three seconds before abandoning a site. How fast does your website load? Use the free Test My Site tool to see how well your site works on mobile. We’ll email you a personalized assessment with specific recommendations on how to make it better.

Want even more?

During National Small Business Week (and throughout the year), Google and our partners are hosting in-person workshops to help you grow your business online. Find a workshop near you.

Small businesses are the heart of our communities. Thank you for making the places we call home, home.

Happy National Small Business Week.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/wtIETbYPW9M/

Your twirling, dancing, arts-appreciating Google Assistant

Category: Google | Apr 28, 2017

Ok Google, when is International Dance Day?

It’s tomorrow! So grab your dancing shoes—the Google Assistant is your new partner. Here’s how it can help you get in the spirit of International Dance Day:

dance

  • Practice makes perfect! Ask your Assistant on Android phones to “show me a video of a fouetté.”
  • Those who can’t dance can become dance history buffs. Ask your Assistant on Google Home “who was the founder of ballet?”
  • If you’re looking to learn new dance moves—ask your Assistant on Android phones “how do you do the Nae Nae?”
  • Get in the spirit with the right music—ask your Assistant on Google Home to “play some samba.”
  • Dust off your history books and ask your Assistant in Google Allo “when was the Lindy Hop popular?”
  • Or answer that burning question you’ve always been wondering about—ask your Assistant “can you dance?” (who wouldn’t want to be a part of the world’s longest conga line?)

Whether you want to hone your dancing skills with some practice or leave it to the experts by watching a video, your Google Assistant can help. We’ll see you on the dance floor.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/sHTzLpQfoFY/

Your twirling, dancing, arts-appreciating Google Assistant

Category: Google | Apr 28, 2017

Ok Google, when is International Dance Day?

It’s tomorrow! So grab your dancing shoes—the Google Assistant is your new partner. Here’s how it can help you get in the spirit of International Dance Day:

dance

  • Practice makes perfect! Ask your Assistant on Android phones to “show me a video of a fouetté.”
  • Those who can’t dance can become dance history buffs. Ask your Assistant on Google Home “who was the founder of ballet?”
  • If you’re looking to learn new dance moves—ask your Assistant on Android phones “how do you do the Nae Nae?”
  • Get in the spirit with the right music—ask your Assistant on Google Home to “play some samba.”
  • Dust off your history books and ask your Assistant in Google Allo “when was the Lindy Hop popular?”
  • Or answer that burning question you’ve always been wondering about—ask your Assistant “can you dance?” (who wouldn’t want to be a part of the world’s longest conga line?)

Whether you want to hone your dancing skills with some practice or leave it to the experts by watching a video, your Google Assistant can help. We’ll see you on the dance floor.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/kKnjFRwWAUM/

The High Five: new discoveries in space and fashion

Category: Google | Apr 28, 2017

What did Saturn say to NASA this week? “High Five.” Here’s a look at a few of the top trending Google searches orbiting the week of April 24.

What have you done this week?

For the first time ever, a spacecraft cruised through the narrow gap between Saturn and its rings. Now NASA’s Cassini is beaming information back to the mothership, and telling NASA about all the cool stuff it saw. Science, FTW! After the feat, people searched on Google for more information: “How does Cassini communicate with Earth?” and “How long did it take for Cassini to reach Saturn?” Some were looking for a refresher astronomy course, asking “How far is Saturn from Earth?” and “How many rings does Saturn have?”

space2

Here comes the tour

Maybe we’re amazed that Paul McCartney is still touring—that guy is Here, There and Everywhere! It’ll be a Hard Day’s Night on the road, but fans twisted and shouted when he announced his 2017 tour dates this week. Though you can’t buy his love, you can buy a ticket to his show. And fans are itching to get those tickets, with questions like “How much are Paul McCartney tickets?” and “When do tickets for Paul McCartney go on sale?” Let it Be soon.

Centi-versary

This Saturday marks President Trump’s 100th day in office, and the first few months of his administration have prompted people to learn more about political concepts and processes. The five most-searched terms related to politics during Trump’s first 100 days are “recuse,” “filibuster,” “vetting,” “executive order” and “immigrant.” Another fun fact to bring to your political debates this weekend: the most-searched names alongside the phrase “Trump handshake”: Justin Trudeau, Angela Merkel, Neil Gorsuch, Shinzo Abe and Benjamin Netanyahu.

Clear as mud

Remember when you were a kid and tracking mud in the house got you into trouble? Times have changed—go ahead and get mud all over yourself. Or pay $425 for jeans covered in fake mud. Perplexed (yet intrigued) shoppers have been searching, “What are mud jeans?” and “Where can I buy mud jeans?”

Shifting gears

NASCAR legend Dale Earnhardt Jr., is at the finish line—he announced he will retire after the 2017 season. Fans are curious about when and why he is retiring and “Who will replace Dale Earnhardt Jr.?” Though he’s known nationwide, southern regions in the U.S. searched most for Earnhardt this week. Top states included North Carolina, West Virginia, Tennessee, Alabama and South Carolina.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/Xku3IJpIoZc/

The High Five: new discoveries in space and fashion

Category: Google | Apr 28, 2017

What did Saturn say to NASA this week? “High Five.” Here’s a look at a few of the top trending Google searches orbiting the week of April 24.

What have you done this week?

For the first time ever, a spacecraft cruised through the narrow gap between Saturn and its rings. Now NASA’s Cassini is beaming information back to the mothership, and telling NASA about all the cool stuff it saw. Science, FTW! After the feat, people searched on Google for more information: “How does Cassini communicate with Earth?” and “How long did it take for Cassini to reach Saturn?” Some were looking for a refresher astronomy course, asking “How far is Saturn from Earth?” and “How many rings does Saturn have?”

space2

Here comes the tour

Maybe we’re amazed that Paul McCartney is still touring—that guy is Here, There and Everywhere! It’ll be a Hard Day’s Night on the road, but fans twisted and shouted when he announced his 2017 tour dates this week. Though you can’t buy his love, you can buy a ticket to his show. And fans are itching to get those tickets, with questions like “How much are Paul McCartney tickets?” and “When do tickets for Paul McCartney go on sale?” Let it Be soon.

Centi-versary

This Saturday marks President Trump’s 100th day in office, and the first few months of his administration have prompted people to learn more about political concepts and processes. The five most-searched terms related to politics during Trump’s first 100 days are “recuse,” “filibuster,” “vetting,” “executive order” and “immigrant.” Another fun fact to bring to your political debates this weekend: the most-searched names alongside the phrase “Trump handshake”: Justin Trudeau, Angela Merkel, Neil Gorsuch, Shinzo Abe and Benjamin Netanyahu.

Clear as mud

Remember when you were a kid and tracking mud in the house got you into trouble? Times have changed—go ahead and get mud all over yourself. Or pay $425 for jeans covered in fake mud. Perplexed (yet intrigued) shoppers have been searching, “What are mud jeans?” and “Where can I buy mud jeans?”

Shifting gears

NASCAR legend Dale Earnhardt Jr., is at the finish line—he announced he will retire after the 2017 season. Fans are curious about when and why he is retiring and “Who will replace Dale Earnhardt Jr.?” Though he’s known nationwide, southern regions in the U.S. searched most for Earnhardt this week. Top states included North Carolina, West Virginia, Tennessee, Alabama and South Carolina.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/qYBsfpMUNF4/

Our ongoing commitment to support computer science educators

Category: Google | Apr 27, 2017

Meet Daryl Detrick, a computer science (CS) teacher at Warren Hills High School in Washington, NJ. He’ll tell you that he doesn’t just teach “coding”—he helps students understand how to approach complex problems that will improve the world around them. He started teaching computer science in 2008, at a time where there were very few resources available to help support him.

Daryl Detrick teacher at Warren Hills HS.png

“The biggest thing I bring into the classroom is inspiration.” – Daryl Detrick

Many CS teachers lack the resources to become skilled and confident in their roles. So today we’re announcing new support for teachers like Mr. Detrick, starting with an additional $2 million in grants to support nonprofit organizations that provide support for teachers throughout their educational careers. Our goal to help increase access to CS skills by empowering more skilled and confident CS teachers globally.

Supporting existing CS teachers and inspiring new ones

Mr. Detrick’s first CS professional development experience was through CS4HS, a Google program that funds educators with localized computer science professional development. Through these grants in 2017-2018, 79 organizations in Australia, U.S., Canada, China, Europe, the Middle East and Africa will receive funding to create pathways and content to foster local communities of educators.

CS4HS focuses on teachers to increase the availability of quality computer science education, while many of Google’s other CS education programs, like Made with Code, focus on students. Over the past 10 years, CS4HS has contributed $10 million to professional development (PD) providers around the world to help train and empower teachers—like Western Wyoming Community College, which helped rural teachers integrate gaming into their CS classes, or Australian Catholic University, which trained 1,600 pre-service teachers in accordance with Australia’s national technology curriculum, among others.

Given the shortage of qualified teachers, it’s important not only to help the educators currently in the field, but also to inspire more teachers to join them. That’s why we’re also supporting pre-service teacher preparation programs developing new coursework that trains aspiring educators at the College of St. Scholastica, the University of California at Irvine, the University of Texas at Austin, and Huston-Tillotson University. We’re excited to work with these universities to help them share their resources with other higher education programs, equipping the next generation of educators with the knowledge and skills to teach CS and computational thinking (CT).

Although we’ve seen a small increase of computer science teachers in recent years—6 percent since 2008—the subject is still largely regarded as an extracurricular activity, and one of the key barriers is a lack of qualified teachers. But research suggests that building training and local pathways are two key ways to retain and grow excellent educators. Today’s grants will help universities and nonprofits reach educators with PD opportunities that enhance their CS and technical skills development, improve their confidence in the classroom, and provide leadership training so that they can be advocates for CS education in their communities.

Growing the community of computer science educators

With the help of his principal and faculty partners at Carnegie Mellon, Rutgers and Kean University, Mr. Detrick has grown his school’s CS program from 53 students to more than 200. He’s also a lead educator advocate for the CSTA New Jersey chapter, and works with the CSNJ advocacy group to influence State legislation that would require all high schools to offer computer science.

We’re excited to support new and future CS educators around the world. Even though computer science is a relatively new discipline for most schools, the enthusiasm is growing—and educators like Mr. Detrick are helping to pave the way for students to learn skills they’ll need for the future. To explore more information about communities of CS teachers near you, explore our computer science education resources and partners.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/pwqWh0OUs20/