News > Google


Celebrating five years of Campus, a home for startups

Category: Google | Jun 7, 2017

We’re big believers in the power of startups to fuel progress and build businesses that make a positive impact—on individuals, communities and economies. But most great startups don’t go it alone: A supportive community is critical to their success. That’s why five years ago, we opened the doors of Campus London and Campus Tel Aviv, our first spaces for entrepreneurs to learn, share, connect and collaborate.

Since then, Google for Entrepreneurs has gone on to open four more Campuses in Seoul, Madrid, Warsaw, São Paulo—and Campus now has 200,000+ members globally. While each location customizes trainings and events to reflect the needs of their city, they have a few key things in common: Anyone can join as a member, host an event for the benefit of local entrepreneurs, or attend educational sessions, all for free. And all of our Campus communities are made of people who see problems as opportunities and then take action to fix them. Founders in Campuses are working to improve the health of older generations with apps like KareInn, foster interaction between governments with citizens with Nama, and help babies and parents sleep better with a smart device called Whisbear

Together, startups in Campus communities have created more than 11,000 jobs and raised more than $537 million in funding for entrepreneurs since 2012. Learn more about these founders and the Campuses they call home:

KareInn - Campus London

KareInn is on a mission to change how we care for older generations through real-time activity tracking and care coordination. They got their start in Campus London’s cafe, grew in the coworking space, and later took investment from our resident accelerator partner, Seedcamp. “The Seedcamp investment happened because we managed to bump into the right people in the [Campus] cafe at the right time,” says co-founder Alex Kenney.

Nama - Campus São Paulo

In a challenging political environment, Nama, a machine learning startup, worked with the State of São Paulo to foster interactions with citizens through a chatbot—exchanging more than 7.5 million messages in less than 90 days. Nama is part of Campus São Paulo‘s Residency program. “Being part of this community in this Google space was instrumental for our growth over the past year,” says founder Rodrigo Scotti.

Lyrics Training

Lyrics Training aims to make online language learning fun, with music videos, lyrics and karaoke. “For a small startup like us, having access to such a personal and detailed training by an expert was amazing. Thanks to his [Googler] mentoring, we have increased our monthly revenue by 30 percent and, after two years with no income, finally I’m able to obtain a monthly salary and work full time on my project,” says founder Fernando Diaz. 

Finda - Seoul

With only 8 percent of startups founded by women in Korea, Hyemin Lee is an inspiration to many. Already a successful entrepreneur, she’s now the cofounder of Finda. While working from Campus Seoul, she hired her first five employees for Finda, raised a $1M Series A round, and with help of Googlers implemented machine learning to her recommendation engine. She also serves as a mentor to women in the community.

SaferVPN - Tel Aviv

SaferVPN, a fast-growing SaaS startup with millions of users, didn’t even have a company name when they first came to Campus Tel Aviv. They participated in Google Developers’ Launchpad, and continued to scale with the support of programs like Campus Exchange: Cyber Security. “When I reflect on where we are today, how far we’ve come, and what it took to get here, I always think of Campus Tel Aviv,” says founder Sagi Gidali. 

Whisbear - Warsaw

New moms Zuzanna Sielicka-Kalczyńska and Julia Sielicka-Jastrzębska wanted to bring newborn babies (and their parents) more peaceful sleep. After years of trial and error, Whisbear was born, a smart soothing device. As participants in Campus for Moms, our baby-friendly startup school, and a two-week immersive startup bootcamp in Silicon Valley,  their new global network is helping them take Whisbear beyond Campus Warsaw.


We’re so proud to support them!

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/bJcBuDU7wwQ/

Experience the songlines of Uluṟu with Google Maps Street View and Story Spheres

Category: Google | Jun 7, 2017

In the heart of Australia’s red center lies the UNESCO World Heritage site, Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park. It is deeply sacred to the Aṉangu people, who have lived there for more than 30,000 years. It’s also home to a wide range of species—21 mammals, 73 reptiles, 178 birds—and Australia’s most iconic natural landmark, Uluṟu.

Starting today, people across the world will be able to visit Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park on Street View, walk on the desert sand and enjoy the vibrant hues of the rock—from ochre to rust to wild plum and charcoal.

Standing 348 m (1,142 ft) high, and with a total circumference of 9.4 km (5.8 mi), the immense scale, colors and contours of Uluṟu stir a sense of reverence. While visually and geologically extraordinary, the physical features of Uluṟu hold a deeper meaning for its traditional owners. For Aṉangu, the land carries sacred “songlines”—creation stories about the journeys, battles and adventures of their ancestral beings.

170404_Day02_0965.jpg

Traditional Owner of Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park, Reggie Uluru

All aspects of Aṉangu life are governed by Tjukurpa, the knowledge which guides relationships, values and behavior. At the core of Tjukurpa law is a deep respect for the land. Aṉangu believe that if they look after the land, it will look after them. These teachings are passed down from generation to generation through stories, songs and inma (ceremony).

‘’Sometimes visitors come here and they see a beautiful place, but they don’t understand the Tjukurpa, the culture and the law and the knowledge and the history that this place holds…. It’s the living keeper of our culture,” says Sammy Wilson, Aṉangu traditional owner of Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park. “We want to teach those visitors about the Aṉangu understanding of this place.”

170403_Day01_0458.jpg

Traditional owner, Sammy Wilson, sharing Tjukurpa stories with Miranda Schooneveldt, Parks Australia

Over the past two years, we collaborated with Aṉangu Traditional Owners of Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park, Parks Australia and the Northern Territory Government to capture the park for Street View according to Tjukurpa law. The Street View journey ventures to the vista of Talinguṟu Nyakunytjaku, the winding trail of the Kuniya Walk, the cool respite of Kapi Muṯitjulu (waterhole) and ancient art at Kulpi Muṯitjulu (Family Cave). It invites you to zoom in on the curves, crevices and textures of Uluṟu—and gaze up at its glowing gradient of color.

170404_Day02_0897.jpg

Lindsey Dixon, of Northern Territory Tourism, captured the Street View content at Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park in accordance with Tjukurpa law

Since 2007, Google has mapped imagery of unique locations across 83 countries, including heritage monuments, touristic sites, museums, national parks and transit locations across the globe.  In the case of Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park, Tjukurpa warranted a more nuanced approach.  For Aṉangu, there is no distinction between the physical and metaphysical, or the animate and inanimate. People, earth, plants and animals are inextricably connected. This means that Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park could never be truly represented or understood (virtually or otherwise) without the presence and voices of its people.

We knew we had to bring these cultural and spiritual dimensions to the Street View experience. So we used the Story Spheres platform to add immersive audio stories and songs of Aṉangu traditional owners to the 360° Street View imagery. The result is an interactive, audio-visual guided tour, narrated by Sammy Wilson and with song and music by Traditional Owner and Aṉangu Elder, Reggie Uluru.

Because Tjukurpa teachings are traditionally handed down through an ancient oral tradition, Aṉangu stories, songs and ceremonies are largely unrecorded. The generosity of traditional owners has made a rare and revered piece of culture available to, and archived for, the world.

170403_Day01_0470.jpg

Traditional owner, Sammy Wilson, sharing Tjukurpa stories with Miranda Schooneveldt, Parks Australia

Together with our partners, we’re privileged to help celebrate and preserve Aṉangu culture through technology. We hope this model will lead to stronger partnerships with indigenous communities across Australia—to share more sacred sites and instill greater value and respect for the land.

Get a behind-the-scenes view of the Google Maps Street View and Story Spheres project in our video.

Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park | Google Maps Street View Launch

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/ngRWCs8y3G0/

Experience the songlines of Uluṟu with Google Maps Street View and Story Spheres

Category: Google | Jun 7, 2017

In the heart of Australia’s red center lies the UNESCO World Heritage site, Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park. It is deeply sacred to the Aṉangu people, who have lived there for more than 30,000 years. It’s also home to a wide range of species—21 mammals, 73 reptiles, 178 birds—and Australia’s most iconic natural landmark, Uluṟu.

Starting today, people across the world will be able to visit Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park on Street View, walk on the desert sand and enjoy the vibrant hues of the rock—from ochre to rust to wild plum and charcoal.

Standing 348 m (1,142 ft) high, and with a total circumference of 9.4 km (5.8 mi), the immense scale, colors and contours of Uluṟu stir a sense of reverence. While visually and geologically extraordinary, the physical features of Uluṟu hold a deeper meaning for its traditional owners. For Aṉangu, the land carries sacred “songlines”—creation stories about the journeys, battles and adventures of their ancestral beings.

170404_Day02_0965.jpg

Traditional Owner of Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park, Reggie Uluru

All aspects of Aṉangu life are governed by Tjukurpa, the knowledge which guides relationships, values and behavior. At the core of Tjukurpa law is a deep respect for the land. Aṉangu believe that if they look after the land, it will look after them. These teachings are passed down from generation to generation through stories, songs and inma (ceremony).

‘’Sometimes visitors come here and they see a beautiful place, but they don’t understand the Tjukurpa, the culture and the law and the knowledge and the history that this place holds…. It’s the living keeper of our culture,” says Sammy Wilson, Aṉangu traditional owner of Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park. “We want to teach those visitors about the Aṉangu understanding of this place.”

170403_Day01_0458.jpg

Traditional owner, Sammy Wilson, sharing Tjukurpa stories with Miranda Schooneveldt, Parks Australia

Over the past two years, we collaborated with Aṉangu Traditional Owners of Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park, Parks Australia and the Northern Territory Government to capture the park for Street View according to Tjukurpa law. The Street View journey ventures to the vista of Talinguṟu Nyakunytjaku, the winding trail of the Kuniya Walk, the cool respite of Kapi Muṯitjulu (waterhole) and ancient art at Kulpi Muṯitjulu (Family Cave). It invites you to zoom in on the curves, crevices and textures of Uluṟu—and gaze up at its glowing gradient of color.

170404_Day02_0897.jpg

Lindsey Dixon, of Northern Territory Tourism, captured the Street View content at Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park in accordance with Tjukurpa law

Since 2007, Google has mapped imagery of unique locations across 83 countries, including heritage monuments, touristic sites, museums, national parks and transit locations across the globe.  In the case of Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park, Tjukurpa warranted a more nuanced approach.  For Aṉangu, there is no distinction between the physical and metaphysical, or the animate and inanimate. People, earth, plants and animals are inextricably connected. This means that Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park could never be truly represented or understood (virtually or otherwise) without the presence and voices of its people.

We knew we had to bring these cultural and spiritual dimensions to the Street View experience. So we used the Story Spheres platform to add immersive audio stories and songs of Aṉangu traditional owners to the 360° Street View imagery. The result is an interactive, audio-visual guided tour, narrated by Sammy Wilson and with song and music by Traditional Owner and Aṉangu Elder, Reggie Uluru.

Because Tjukurpa teachings are traditionally handed down through an ancient oral tradition, Aṉangu stories, songs and ceremonies are largely unrecorded. The generosity of traditional owners has made a rare and revered piece of culture available to, and archived for, the world.

170403_Day01_0470.jpg

Traditional owner, Sammy Wilson, sharing Tjukurpa stories with Miranda Schooneveldt, Parks Australia

Together with our partners, we’re privileged to help celebrate and preserve Aṉangu culture through technology. We hope this model will lead to stronger partnerships with indigenous communities across Australia—to share more sacred sites and instill greater value and respect for the land.

Get a behind-the-scenes view of the Google Maps Street View and Story Spheres project in our video.

Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park | Google Maps Street View Launch

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/0Amg5v2lqt0/

Sell smarter with ProsperWorks for G Suite

Category: Google | Jun 6, 2017

If you want to scale your business, you’ve likely invested in a CRM solution to manage sales workflows and speed up data-driven decision-making – but, CRMs have become a clunky epicenter for team collaboration. You need actionable data insights to drive deals forward, which often require a CRM tool that integrates with the apps you use every day. ProsperWorks for G Suite can help:

With ProsperWorks for G Suite, it’s simple to integrate your CRM with the tools you already use, like Gmail, Calendar and Docs. You can:

  • Access everything in one place—forget toggling back and forth between your CRM and G Suite applications
  • Automatically sync Google Contacts in ProsperWorks
  • View and track sales activity in real-time directly within Gmail
  • Export data from Sheets to ProsperWorks and get insights instantly without manual data entry
  • Create custom dashboards, reports and charts using the Google Sheets integration in the ProsperWorks CRM Custom Report Builder

Why UrbanVolt chose ProsperWorks for G Suite

UrbanVolt, an energy-saving firm based in Dublin, Ireland, installs LED lighting for businesses at no upfront cost (“lighting as a service”). This leasing model allowed the company to scale rapidly, but it also meant managing a higher volume of inbound leads. “We needed a solution that would allow us to scale our inbounds and deal flow with ease,” says Edel Kennedy, Head of Marketing at UrbanVolt.

The UrbanVolt team opted for ProsperWorks for its intuitive design and its seamless integration with G Suite. “ProsperWorks was the clear choice for our team. There was no learning curve since it worked with G Suite, where we spend the majority of our day,” says Kennedy.

Now, UrbanVolt employees save time because they don’t have to toggle between their CRM and spreadsheets to analyze data. Instead, they use G Suite tools like Sheets Add-on for ProsperWorks to view opportunities at various stages in the sales cycle, and create advanced dashboards, reports, charts and graphs collaboratively.

If you want to get started using ProsperWorks for G Suite at your business, sign up for a free webinar on Wednesday, June 21, 2017 at 9 a.m. PT / 12 p.m. ET.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/-KSLvsRkB2g/

Sell smarter with ProsperWorks for G Suite

Category: Google | Jun 6, 2017

If you want to scale your business, you’ve likely invested in a CRM solution to manage sales workflows and speed up data-driven decision-making – but, CRMs have become a clunky epicenter for team collaboration. You need actionable data insights to drive deals forward, which often require a CRM tool that integrates with the apps you use every day. ProsperWorks for G Suite can help:

With ProsperWorks for G Suite, it’s simple to integrate your CRM with the tools you already use, like Gmail, Calendar and Docs. You can:

  • Access everything in one place—forget toggling back and forth between your CRM and G Suite applications
  • Automatically sync Google Contacts in ProsperWorks
  • View and track sales activity in real-time directly within Gmail
  • Export data from Sheets to ProsperWorks and get insights instantly without manual data entry
  • Create custom dashboards, reports and charts using the Google Sheets integration in the ProsperWorks CRM Custom Report Builder

Why UrbanVolt chose ProsperWorks for G Suite

UrbanVolt, an energy-saving firm based in Dublin, Ireland, installs LED lighting for businesses at no upfront cost (“lighting as a service”). This leasing model allowed the company to scale rapidly, but it also meant managing a higher volume of inbound leads. “We needed a solution that would allow us to scale our inbounds and deal flow with ease,” says Edel Kennedy, Head of Marketing at UrbanVolt.

The UrbanVolt team opted for ProsperWorks for its intuitive design and its seamless integration with G Suite. “ProsperWorks was the clear choice for our team. There was no learning curve since it worked with G Suite, where we spend the majority of our day,” says Kennedy.

Now, UrbanVolt employees save time because they don’t have to toggle between their CRM and spreadsheets to analyze data. Instead, they use G Suite tools like Sheets Add-on for ProsperWorks to view opportunities at various stages in the sales cycle, and create advanced dashboards, reports, charts and graphs collaboratively.

If you want to get started using ProsperWorks for G Suite at your business, sign up for a free webinar on Wednesday, June 21, 2017 at 9 a.m. PT / 12 p.m. ET.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/E9V9kifT6DE/

Teaching why, not how: My takeaways from Google’s certification training

Category: Google | Jun 6, 2017

Editor’s note: Donnie Piercey is a fifth grade social studies teacher and technology integration specialist at Eminence Independent Schools in Eminence, KY. In this post, part of Google for Education PD Week, he shares his experience of becoming a Google Certified Educator. PD Week is an opportunity for educators to learn new ways to connect with peers, learn Google tools, and get certified. If you’re an educator, learn more about #GooglePDWeek by following @GoogleforEdu on Twitter and reading the schedule. If you’re an administrator, visit the Transformation Center for inspiration on creative approaches to PD.

I’d bet I’m not the only teacher who’s looked at my room full of students and thought, “This looks like any other classroom on the planet.” I strive to avoid that; my students are special and I want them to feel it every day. But that doesn’t always happen when I’m lecturing and they’re looking at identical worksheets.

A few years ago I hit a turning point. I wanted more opportunities to work individually with my students, to develop their writing skills, and to help them become better collaborators and communicators. I knew technology could help me achieve this, but I wasn’t totally sure how my students and I could take full advantage of tools like G Suite for Education. For example, my students already loved working in Google Docs, but mostly as a substitute to pencil and paper. I thought they could do more with Google Docs to generate ideas, work together and problem solve. This sense of potential drove me to seek out more official professional development opportunities—and complete the Google Certified Education training.

The simplicity and flexibility of the training made it easy to complete both the Level 1 and Level 2 courses—the videos were easy to follow, and I could go at my own pace. It didn’t feel like mandated professional development. It was actually something I wanted to do.

After getting certified, I joined a Google Educator Group (GEG), helping to connect me with a network of tens of thousands of other certified educators around the world. I can send a message to one of my groups, like “I’m trying to figure out a way to help my students understand where important events in history took place using Google Earth,”  and learn how other educators are did this in their classrooms.

For me, training and GEGs have sparked ideas for activities. For example, I decided to have my students create YouTube videos to teach students in other classrooms how to update images of Google Street View to offer a richer view into their communities on Google Maps. My peers inspired me to engage my students with lesson plans that focus on memorable storytelling as well as the subject matter. I’ve learned how to use Google Slides to design better presentations that include videos and images. I can share a presentation with one click and my students can access the material at home.

Donnie Piercey-EDU.png

Donnie Piercey, fifth grade teacher and Google Certified Educator, uses technology to help transform learning for students. (Photo credit: James Allen, Eminence Schools)

Outside of lesson planning, the greatest impact of Google certification is the time I’ve saved. I’ve learned shortcuts like tagging a student in a document or using Hangouts to chat about a question from that day’s class. A few minutes here and there add up, and the extra this time goes into developing relationships—working one on one with students and talking with parents. 

In general, the time I’ve spent on professional development during the summer and other breaks has been more than made up for by the energy it’s injected into my classroom every day. Spending a few hours on professional development during the summer and other breaks is more than worth it. In my district, half of our staff have reached Level 1 certification, and this year I’m working with a cohort on Level 2 as a Google Certified Trainer. I see the results every day in my classroom, where I’m no longer lecturing to a room of students reading from the same workbook. The experience is new every time we start a lesson. I look forward to learning more during the summer so I can bring fresh ideas to my new students this fall. Have a great summer!

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/_eHAVCloWHE/

Teaching why, not how: My takeaways from Google’s certification training

Category: Google | Jun 6, 2017

Editor’s note: Donnie Piercey is a fifth grade social studies teacher and technology integration specialist at Eminence Independent Schools in Eminence, KY. In this post, part of Google for Education PD Week, he shares his experience of becoming a Google Certified Educator. PD Week is an opportunity for educators to learn new ways to connect with peers, learn Google tools, and get certified. If you’re an educator, learn more about #GooglePDWeek by following @GoogleforEdu on Twitter and reading the schedule. If you’re an administrator, visit the Transformation Center for inspiration on creative approaches to PD.

I’d bet I’m not the only teacher who’s looked at my room full of students and thought, “This looks like any other classroom on the planet.” I strive to avoid that; my students are special and I want them to feel it every day. But that doesn’t always happen when I’m lecturing and they’re looking at identical worksheets.

A few years ago I hit a turning point. I wanted more opportunities to work individually with my students, to develop their writing skills, and to help them become better collaborators and communicators. I knew technology could help me achieve this, but I wasn’t totally sure how my students and I could take full advantage of tools like G Suite for Education. For example, my students already loved working in Google Docs, but mostly as a substitute to pencil and paper. I thought they could do more with Google Docs to generate ideas, work together and problem solve. This sense of potential drove me to seek out more official professional development opportunities—and complete the Google Certified Education training.

The simplicity and flexibility of the training made it easy to complete both the Level 1 and Level 2 courses—the videos were easy to follow, and I could go at my own pace. It didn’t feel like mandated professional development. It was actually something I wanted to do.

After getting certified, I joined a Google Educator Group (GEG), helping to connect me with a network of tens of thousands of other certified educators around the world. I can send a message to one of my groups, like “I’m trying to figure out a way to help my students understand where important events in history took place using Google Earth,”  and learn how other educators are did this in their classrooms.

For me, training and GEGs have sparked ideas for activities. For example, I decided to have my students create YouTube videos to teach students in other classrooms how to update images of Google Street View to offer a richer view into their communities on Google Maps. My peers inspired me to engage my students with lesson plans that focus on memorable storytelling as well as the subject matter. I’ve learned how to use Google Slides to design better presentations that include videos and images. I can share a presentation with one click and my students can access the material at home.

Donnie Piercey-EDU.png

Donnie Piercey, fifth grade teacher and Google Certified Educator, uses technology to help transform learning for students. (Photo credit: James Allen, Eminence Schools)

Outside of lesson planning, the greatest impact of Google certification is the time I’ve saved. I’ve learned shortcuts like tagging a student in a document or using Hangouts to chat about a question from that day’s class. A few minutes here and there add up, and the extra this time goes into developing relationships—working one on one with students and talking with parents. 

In general, the time I’ve spent on professional development during the summer and other breaks has been more than made up for by the energy it’s injected into my classroom every day. Spending a few hours on professional development during the summer and other breaks is more than worth it. In my district, half of our staff have reached Level 1 certification, and this year I’m working with a cohort on Level 2 as a Google Certified Trainer. I see the results every day in my classroom, where I’m no longer lecturing to a room of students reading from the same workbook. The experience is new every time we start a lesson. I look forward to learning more during the summer so I can bring fresh ideas to my new students this fall. Have a great summer!

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/cSnFNuhQUyU/

Daydream Labs: Locomotion in VR

Category: Google | Jun 6, 2017

Getting from Point A to Point B in real life is relatively straightforward, but in virtual reality, it can be difficult to build an experience where moving through a 3D environment feels natural. VR developers need to prevent motion sickness to keep people comfortable in VR, and the user experience for moving around—also known as locomotion—isn’t a solved problem.

There are a variety of different ways to achieve effective locomotion, each with their own set of tradeoffs. Daydream Labs and teams across Google have explored ways to make locomotion comfortable, intuitive, and fun. We recently released Daydream Elements, a collection of tech demos that showcase principles and best practices for developing high-quality VR experiences. The core mechanics in each demo are built to be easily configurable and reusable for your own apps. Here are a few things we’ve learned about locomotion:

1. Constant velocity. Locomotion in VR can cause motion sickness when there’s a conflict between a person’s vision and their sense of balance. For example, if you see images showing you accelerating through space, like on a roller coaster, but you’re actually sitting stationary in a room, then your vision and vestibular system will disagree. A way to mitigate this is to use constant velocity during locomotion. Although acceleration can be used to produce more realistic transitions, constant velocity is far more comfortable than acceleration in VR.

Constant velocity

While changing velocity is well received in mobile apps, constant velocity is far more comfortable in VR experiences.

2. Tunneling. Tunneling is a technique used with first-person locomotion (such as walking) where, during movement, the camera is cropped and a stable grid is displayed in your peripheral vision. This is analogous to watching first-person locomotion on a television set.

Even though TV shows and movies contain moving images with acceleration, most people don’t experience motion sickness while watching TV. This is perhaps because the TV only takes up a small part of your field of view and your peripheral vision is grounded by a stationary room. VR developers can simulate this by showing people a visual “tunnel” while they’re moving in a 3D environment. We also found it helps to fade the tunnel effect in and out to avoid making it a distraction. We used this approach in Google Earth VR in a feature called Comfort Mode.

Google Earth VR

Comfort Mode in Google Earth VR helps provide a constant frame of reference in your peripheral vision.

3. Teleportation. Teleportation is a locomotion technique for apps using first-person perspective that allows you to near-instantaneously move to a target location. This technique reduces the simulator sickness that many people feel when the virtual camera moves. However, it also makes it harder for people to maintain spatial context—“where am I, and how did I get here?” We found there are subtle things that can ease the transition and improve context. For example, Google Street View on Daydream fades before and after teleportation. Also, when you teleport to a new location, the app quickly moves the entire scene toward you to convey directional motion. This effect is called “implied motion.”

Google Street View

Displaying a fade or dissolve transition when teleporting from point to point creates implied motion in Google Street View on Daydream.

4. Rotation. It’s often tempting to design a VR experience where we assume that people will be either standing or sitting in a swivel chair. Unfortunately, hardware limitations or physical constraints may not allow for full 360-degree rotation. To make sure people can get where they want to go in a VR environment, consider giving them the ability to rotate themselves within the virtual space. Continuous and animated rotations tend to induce motion sickness. Instead, we’ve found that discrete, instantaneous rotations of about 10-20 degrees feel comfortable and provide sufficient visual context to keep people oriented.

We hope this helps give you a few ways to think about locomotion in VR, and we’ll share more with the community as we continue to explore.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/JApTwP3kT5Q/

Daydream Labs: Locomotion in VR

Category: Google | Jun 6, 2017

Getting from Point A to Point B in real life is relatively straightforward, but in virtual reality, it can be difficult to build an experience where moving through a 3D environment feels natural. VR developers need to prevent motion sickness to keep people comfortable in VR, and the user experience for moving around—also known as locomotion—isn’t a solved problem.

There are a variety of different ways to achieve effective locomotion, each with their own set of tradeoffs. Daydream Labs and teams across Google have explored ways to make locomotion comfortable, intuitive, and fun. We recently released Daydream Elements, a collection of tech demos that showcase principles and best practices for developing high-quality VR experiences. The core mechanics in each demo are built to be easily configurable and reusable for your own apps. Here are a few things we’ve learned about locomotion:

1. Constant velocity. Locomotion in VR can cause motion sickness when there’s a conflict between a person’s vision and their sense of balance. For example, if you see images showing you accelerating through space, like on a roller coaster, but you’re actually sitting stationary in a room, then your vision and vestibular system will disagree. A way to mitigate this is to use constant velocity during locomotion. Although acceleration can be used to produce more realistic transitions, constant velocity is far more comfortable than acceleration in VR.

Constant velocity

While changing velocity is well received in mobile apps, constant velocity is far more comfortable in VR experiences.

2. Tunneling. Tunneling is a technique used with first-person locomotion (such as walking) where, during movement, the camera is cropped and a stable grid is displayed in your peripheral vision. This is analogous to watching first-person locomotion on a television set.

Even though TV shows and movies contain moving images with acceleration, most people don’t experience motion sickness while watching TV. This is perhaps because the TV only takes up a small part of your field of view and your peripheral vision is grounded by a stationary room. VR developers can simulate this by showing people a visual “tunnel” while they’re moving in a 3D environment. We also found it helps to fade the tunnel effect in and out to avoid making it a distraction. We used this approach in Google Earth VR in a feature called Comfort Mode.

Google Earth VR

Comfort Mode in Google Earth VR helps provide a constant frame of reference in your peripheral vision.

3. Teleportation. Teleportation is a locomotion technique for apps using first-person perspective that allows you to near-instantaneously move to a target location. This technique reduces the simulator sickness that many people feel when the virtual camera moves. However, it also makes it harder for people to maintain spatial context—“where am I, and how did I get here?” We found there are subtle things that can ease the transition and improve context. For example, Google Street View on Daydream fades before and after teleportation. Also, when you teleport to a new location, the app quickly moves the entire scene toward you to convey directional motion. This effect is called “implied motion.”

Google Street View

Displaying a fade or dissolve transition when teleporting from point to point creates implied motion in Google Street View on Daydream.

4. Rotation. It’s often tempting to design a VR experience where we assume that people will be either standing or sitting in a swivel chair. Unfortunately, hardware limitations or physical constraints may not allow for full 360-degree rotation. To make sure people can get where they want to go in a VR environment, consider giving them the ability to rotate themselves within the virtual space. Continuous and animated rotations tend to induce motion sickness. Instead, we’ve found that discrete, instantaneous rotations of about 10-20 degrees feel comfortable and provide sufficient visual context to keep people oriented.

We hope this helps give you a few ways to think about locomotion in VR, and we’ll share more with the community as we continue to explore.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/1q4e0EyKiVc/

“Be Internet Awesome”: Helping kids make smart decisions online

Category: Google | Jun 6, 2017

As a parent, I’m constantly talking with my two daughters about how they use the Internet. The way they use it to explore, create and learn inspires me to do my best work at Google, where I lead a team making products that help families and kids have positive experiences online. But for kids to really make the most of the web, we need more than just helpful products: We need to provide guidance as they learn to make their own smart decisions online.

This is one of the most significant issues that we all face as a new generation grows up with the Internet at their fingertips. It’s critical that the most influential people in our kids’ lives—parents and teachers, especially—help kids learn how to be smart, positive and kind online, just like we teach them to be offline. It’s something we all need to reinforce together.

With school out and summer break giving kids more time to spend on the Internet, it’s a great time to introduce Be Internet Awesome: a new way to encourage digital safety and citizenship.

Developed in collaboration with online safety experts like the Family Online Safety Institute, the Internet Keep Safe Coalition and ConnectSafely, Be Internet Awesome focuses on five key lessons to help kids navigate the online world with confidence:

  • Be Internet Smart: Share with care
  • Be Internet Alert: Don’t fall for fake
  • Be Internet Strong: Secure your secrets
  • Be Internet Kind: It’s cool to be kind
  • Be Internet Brave: When in doubt, talk it out

The program includes a range of specific resources for kids, educators and parents, so everyone has the tools they need to learn and participate in the conversation.

For kids

To help kids learn these lessons in a way that’s fun and immersive, we created an interactive, online game called Interland. It’s free and web-based so it’s easily accessible by everyone, and most importantly, it’s in a format kids already love. In this imaginary world of four lands, kids combat hackers, phishers, oversharers and bullies, practicing the skills they need to be good digital citizens.

For educators

We partnered with the Internet Keep Safe Coalition and educators across the country to create a classroom curriculum that brings the five principles of being Internet Awesome to life, at school. To practice being Internet Alert, for example, students can work together to identify whether websites and emails contain signs of a phishing attempt. The lesson plans, activities and worksheets align with the International Society for Technology in Education’s Standards for Students, which educators look toward to define skills for safe and positive action online.

“Building these skills in our students will require ongoing attention as new technologies pose challenges and opportunities for students both at home and at school,”  says Carolyn Sykora, Senior Director of Standards at ISTE. “Be Internet Awesome provides materials educators and parents can use to help students learn about online safety in a fun and engaging way.”

After reviewing the game and curriculum, ISTE has awarded Be Internet Awesome its Seal of Alignment for Readiness. Educators can find the curriculum on the Be Internet Awesome resource hub, or as part of a new online course in the Google for Education Training Center.

For parents and guardians

Without some guidance, having a meaningful conversation about digital safety and respect at home can be really hard. These are sensitive topics and parents may not know where to start. To help make starting the conversation easier, we teamed up with a group of YouTube creators, including John Green, the What’s Inside? Family and MinutePhysics, to launch the #BeInternetAwesome Challenge, a video series that makes talking about online safety fun and accessible. Families can reinforce important lessons at home by signing the Be Internet Awesome Pledge to stay smart, alert, strong, kind and brave online.

My team and I will continue Google’s work to make the Internet a safer, more positive place for kids, and this is an exciting new chapter in our ongoing efforts. Ready, set, Be Internet Awesome! g.co/BeInternetAwesome

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/kEKtjyPBG5U/