News > Google


The High Five: baseball and (maybe) an extinct tiger are back again

Category: Google | Apr 7, 2017

This week tiger aficionados got a curveball, a Pepsi ad struck out and a Supreme Court nomination made it to the final inning. Oh, and Major League Baseball is back for the season. Here’s a look at five of the top trending Google searches from the week of April 3.

Play ball!

Sports fans stepped up to the search plate this week. With baseball season now officially underway, fans were eager to find out how their teams were doing on Opening Day. Red Sox, Cubs, Orioles and Cardinals scores were the most searched.

Soda ad canned

This week, there was backlash against Pepsi’s new ad featuring model Kendall Jenner. Many called the ad “tone deaf” in light of recent protests and the political climate. Searchers were curious about which advertising agency was behind the ad, and asked “why did Pepsi apologize?” and “why did Pepsi pull the ad?”

Extinct … we think?

An animal strongly resembling the Tasmanian tiger, which was thought to be extinct, was sighted this week—and experts and scientists are in an uproooooaaaarrr. Now people want to know “What year did a Tasmanian tiger become extinct?” (answer: 1936) and “Is it possible that Tasmanian tigers still exist?” (answer: TBD).

tiger

Going nuclear

Today Judge Neil Gorsuch was confirmed as the 113th justice of the Supreme Court. Leading up to the confirmation, there was a lot of talk of the “nuclear option.” The term is still a mystery to many, who searched to find out “When was the last time the nuclear option was used?” and “Who came up with the nuclear option?”

And the winner is…

Nominations for MTV Movie and TV awards (that’s right, TV is included for the first time this year!) were announced this week. Of the nominated movies and TV shows, “Get Out” and “Atlanta” were most searched. People were curious about who’s hosting this year’s show and the award categories—so if you have strong feelings about this year’s “Tearjerker,” or “Best Fight Against the System,” cast your vote before May 7.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/AAm-wObnk98/

Let your Assistant guide you to Jupiter

Category: Google | Apr 7, 2017

It’s an exciting night for the largest planet in our solar system, Jupiter. As it makes its closest approach to earth this year, your Google Assistant can help you get the most out of this space spectacle.

jupiter

Get ready by asking your Google Assistant on your Android phone “when does the sun set today” and “remind me to look for Jupiter after 8pm tonight.” Make it a family affair by asking your Assistant to “text mom to go outside and see Jupiter tonight.’” And while you shouldn’t need a telescope for this show, it can’t hurt to get a closer look—ask “show me videos on making a telescope” for some creative inspiration.  

When you’re at home, pass the time waiting by asking your Google Assistant on Google Home “how long does Jupiter take to orbit around the sun?” or “How big is Jupiter?” While we don’t recommend space travel on such short notice, it’s never a bad time to dream.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/dVMOVVFkmjM/

Let your Assistant guide you to Jupiter

Category: Google | Apr 7, 2017

It’s an exciting night for the largest planet in our solar system, Jupiter. As it makes its closest approach to earth this year, your Google Assistant can help you get the most out of this space spectacle.

jupiter

Get ready by asking your Google Assistant on your Android phone “when does the sun set today” and “remind me to look for Jupiter after 8pm tonight.” Make it a family affair by asking your Assistant to “text mom to go outside and see Jupiter tonight.’” And while you shouldn’t need a telescope for this show, it can’t hurt to get a closer look—ask “show me videos on making a telescope” for some creative inspiration.  

When you’re at home, pass the time waiting by asking your Google Assistant on Google Home “how long does Jupiter take to orbit around the sun?” or “How big is Jupiter?” While we don’t recommend space travel on such short notice, it’s never a bad time to dream.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/EDXBQpexivA/

Fact Check now available in Google Search and News around the world

Category: Google | Apr 7, 2017

Google was built to help people find useful information by surfacing the great content that publishers and sites create. This access to high quality information is what drives people to use the web and for contributors to continue to engage and invest in it.

However, with thousands of new articles published online every minute of every day, the amount of content confronting people online can be overwhelming.  And unfortunately, not all of it is factual or true, making it hard for people to distinguish fact from fiction. That’s why last October, along with our partners at Jigsaw, we announced that in a few countries we would start enabling publishers to show a “Fact Check” tag in Google News for news stories. This label identifies articles that include information fact checked by news publishers and fact-checking organizations.

After assessing feedback from both users and publishers, we’re making the Fact Check label in Google News available everywhere, and expanding it into Search globally in all languages. For the first time, when you conduct a search on Google that returns an authoritative result containing fact checks for one or more public claims, you will see that information clearly on the search results page. The snippet will display information on the claim, who made the claim, and the fact check of that particular claim.

FactCheck_Apr7.png

This information won’t be available for every search result, and there may be search result pages where different publishers checked the same claim and reached different conclusions. These fact checks are not Google’s and are presented so people can make more informed judgements. Even though differing conclusions may be presented, we think it’s still helpful for people to understand the degree of consensus around a particular claim and have clear information on which sources agree. As we make fact checks more visible in Search results, we believe people will have an easier time reviewing and assessing these fact checks, and making their own informed opinions.

For publishers to be included in this feature, they must be using the Schema.org ClaimReview markup on the specific pages where they fact check public statements (documentation here), or they can use the Share the Facts widget developed by the Duke University Reporters Lab and Jigsaw. Only publishers that are algorithmically determined to be an authoritative source of information will qualify for inclusion. Finally, the content must adhere to the general policies that apply to all structured data markup, the Google News Publisher criteria for fact checks, and the standards for accountability and transparency, readability or proper site representation as articulated in our Google News General Guidelines. If a publisher or fact check claim does not meet these standards or honor these policies, we may, at our discretion, ignore that site’s markup.

screenshot

This effort wouldn’t be possible without the help of other organizations and the fact check community, which has grown to 115 organizations. To find out more about this new feature, visit the Help Center.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/-THbgSDZ3TY/

Fact Check now available in Google Search and News around the world

Category: Google | Apr 7, 2017

Google was built to help people find useful information by surfacing the great content that publishers and sites create. This access to high quality information is what drives people to use the web and for contributors to continue to engage and invest in it.

However, with thousands of new articles published online every minute of every day, the amount of content confronting people online can be overwhelming.  And unfortunately, not all of it is factual or true, making it hard for people to distinguish fact from fiction. That’s why last October, along with our partners at Jigsaw, we announced that in a few countries we would start enabling publishers to show a “Fact Check” tag in Google News for news stories. This label identifies articles that include information fact checked by news publishers and fact-checking organizations.

After assessing feedback from both users and publishers, we’re making the Fact Check label in Google News available everywhere, and expanding it into Search globally in all languages. For the first time, when you conduct a search on Google that returns an authoritative result containing fact checks for one or more public claims, you will see that information clearly on the search results page. The snippet will display information on the claim, who made the claim, and the fact check of that particular claim.

FactCheck_Apr7.png

This information won’t be available for every search result, and there may be search result pages where different publishers checked the same claim and reached different conclusions. These fact checks are not Google’s and are presented so people can make more informed judgements. Even though differing conclusions may be presented, we think it’s still helpful for people to understand the degree of consensus around a particular claim and have clear information on which sources agree. As we make fact checks more visible in Search results, we believe people will have an easier time reviewing and assessing these fact checks, and making their own informed opinions.

For publishers to be included in this feature, they must be using the Schema.org ClaimReview markup on the specific pages where they fact check public statements (documentation here), or they can use the Share the Facts widget developed by the Duke University Reporters Lab and Jigsaw. Only publishers that are algorithmically determined to be an authoritative source of information will qualify for inclusion. Finally, the content must adhere to the general policies that apply to all structured data markup, the Google News Publisher criteria for fact checks, and the standards for accountability and transparency, readability or proper site representation as articulated in our Google News General Guidelines. If a publisher or fact check claim does not meet these standards or honor these policies, we may, at our discretion, ignore that site’s markup.

screenshot

This effort wouldn’t be possible without the help of other organizations and the fact check community, which has grown to 115 organizations. To find out more about this new feature, visit the Help Center.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/Wj6QdOemzao/

Système U connects supermarket workers with Chrome and G Suite

Category: Google | Apr 6, 2017

Editor’s note: Today’s blog post comes from Philippe Bonnet, G Suite Advisor and Senior Consultant at Système U, a cooperative organization of 1,500 independent supermarkets across France. Système U began as a bread cooperative founded in Western France in 1894, before its creation in 1983. The company adopted Google Chrome browser and G Suite in  2013 to save time for each cooperative team and to allow supermarket employees to work together more efficiently.

Most of Système U’s 60,000 employees interact with customers throughout the work day. In Paris, they roam store aisles helping customers find the groceries they need. In Clermont l’Herault in the South, they may be unloading deliveries. Or in Mulhouse in the East, they might be designing and setting up store displays. What they have in common is that they usually don’t sit in front of a computer all day, nor are they IT experts. Any communication and collaboration tools need to fit the way they serve customers—which is why we chose Chrome browser and G Suite.

Systeme U Chromebook G Suite usage

Before we switched to Chrome and G Suite, employees in our 1,500 stores—from large hypermarkets in big cities to small stores in rural areas—used many different email and productivity tools and web browsers. This was also true for employees like me at our corporate headquarters in Rungis, near Paris or at our IT headquarters in Carquefou, near Nantes. Some of us used Outlook for email, some used GroupWise. Management employees couldn’t easily access their email when they traveled out of the office, so they couldn’t keep their projects operating smoothly from the road.

Most employees used Internet Explorer for web access, but not necessarily the same versions. Both office and store employees use web-based applications for the retail industry. Every time a new version of IE was released, the IT team had to spend many hours making sure the apps were compatible with the updated browsers across all versions. IE’s roadmap also wasn’t very clear to our developers; we didn’t know when updates would occur, and optimizing apps to work with IE was time-consuming and expensive.

In 2013, we began our move to the cloud, and specifically Gmail and Chrome. We wanted to be in the cloud where we wouldn’t have to worry about adding servers to manage email, and employees could access their messages from anywhere,  whether walking through stores or commuting to work. We made Chrome our official browser company-wide, and it’s the only browser we now support, which makes our IT team’s job much easier. It’s a much more transparent and flexible browser—we can choose when and how we receive updates and security fixes, so we know what’s coming and when.

Système U IT

We also made the decision to build the apps used by our employees so that they are compatible with Chrome, even as the browser is updated. This is another way we help both employees and IT staff save time, since users don’t need to worry if their everyday apps will work with the browser.

Now that my technical colleagues and I spend less time trying to make apps function with a browser, we have more time for long-term projects, such as rolling out other G Suite products such as Google Drive, Google Slides, and G+. We just wrapped up a pilot project in nine stores with Google Drive, and employees are very enthusiastic about keeping documents in a central place where their co-workers can share them to keep projects moving along at a steady pace. Our 2017 plan is to deploy Google Drive company-wide.

Système U employees work hard enough without asking them to troubleshoot email or app problems. Any collaboration and email tools we provide to them need to be easy to use right away, without extensive training or ramp-up time. Employees don’t need to be tied to their computers, and they can spend more time doing what they do best—meeting and helping customers face to face in the supermarket aisles.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/YE7mdDKOTDs/

Système U connects supermarket workers with Chrome and G Suite

Category: Google | Apr 6, 2017

Editor’s note: Today’s blog post comes from Philippe Bonnet, G Suite Advisor and Senior Consultant at Système U, a cooperative organization of 1,500 independent supermarkets across France. Système U began as a bread cooperative founded in Western France in 1894, before its creation in 1983. The company adopted Google Chrome browser and G Suite in  2013 to save time for each cooperative team and to allow supermarket employees to work together more efficiently.

Most of Système U’s 60,000 employees interact with customers throughout the work day. In Paris, they roam store aisles helping customers find the groceries they need. In Clermont l’Herault in the South, they may be unloading deliveries. Or in Mulhouse in the East, they might be designing and setting up store displays. What they have in common is that they usually don’t sit in front of a computer all day, nor are they IT experts. Any communication and collaboration tools need to fit the way they serve customers—which is why we chose Chrome browser and G Suite.

Systeme U Chromebook G Suite usage

Before we switched to Chrome and G Suite, employees in our 1,500 stores—from large hypermarkets in big cities to small stores in rural areas—used many different email and productivity tools and web browsers. This was also true for employees like me at our corporate headquarters in Rungis, near Paris or at our IT headquarters in Carquefou, near Nantes. Some of us used Outlook for email, some used GroupWise. Management employees couldn’t easily access their email when they traveled out of the office, so they couldn’t keep their projects operating smoothly from the road.

Most employees used Internet Explorer for web access, but not necessarily the same versions. Both office and store employees use web-based applications for the retail industry. Every time a new version of IE was released, the IT team had to spend many hours making sure the apps were compatible with the updated browsers across all versions. IE’s roadmap also wasn’t very clear to our developers; we didn’t know when updates would occur, and optimizing apps to work with IE was time-consuming and expensive.

In 2013, we began our move to the cloud, and specifically Gmail and Chrome. We wanted to be in the cloud where we wouldn’t have to worry about adding servers to manage email, and employees could access their messages from anywhere,  whether walking through stores or commuting to work. We made Chrome our official browser company-wide, and it’s the only browser we now support, which makes our IT team’s job much easier. It’s a much more transparent and flexible browser—we can choose when and how we receive updates and security fixes, so we know what’s coming and when.

Système U IT

We also made the decision to build the apps used by our employees so that they are compatible with Chrome, even as the browser is updated. This is another way we help both employees and IT staff save time, since users don’t need to worry if their everyday apps will work with the browser.

Now that my technical colleagues and I spend less time trying to make apps function with a browser, we have more time for long-term projects, such as rolling out other G Suite products such as Google Drive, Google Slides, and G+. We just wrapped up a pilot project in nine stores with Google Drive, and employees are very enthusiastic about keeping documents in a central place where their co-workers can share them to keep projects moving along at a steady pace. Our 2017 plan is to deploy Google Drive company-wide.

Système U employees work hard enough without asking them to troubleshoot email or app problems. Any collaboration and email tools we provide to them need to be easy to use right away, without extensive training or ramp-up time. Employees don’t need to be tied to their computers, and they can spend more time doing what they do best—meeting and helping customers face to face in the supermarket aisles.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/0fUO2Ky9dhU/

Google Cloud Platform partners with Elastic to offer managed open source search and analytics on GCP

Category: Google | Apr 6, 2017

In the world of open-source search engines, Elasticsearch is certainly one of the most popular and powerful. The Elastic stack—Elasticsearch, Kibana, Beats and Logstash—offers search, log analysis and visualization for search, logging, security, metrics and analytics.

Today we’re announcing a new partnership with Elastic to bring managed support of its open source search and analytics platform to Google Cloud Platform (GCP), bringing joint customers high-performance global network and scale, increased security and privacy, data analytics and machine learning and the tools needed to build today’s modern applications.  

Openness is a key pillar of our partner philosophy and a driving force across Google. Embracing partnerships and working collaboratively with best-of-breed open source technology allows us to offer our customers choice and flexibility. We want GCP to be the best place to collaborate and solve problems using open source technologies.

With managed Elastic Cloud on GCP, developers get a hosted and managed Elasticsearch and Kibana offering, the latest versions of Elastic’s software, commercial features, including increased security, alerting, monitoring, graph and reporting, and support from Elastic engineers. This service will allow customers to more easily deploy, manage and scale Elasticsearch on GCP based on their specific needs.

Elastic’s solutions power web, mobile and application search and analytics experiences for some of the world’s biggest brands, and developers have downloaded Elastic’s products more than 100 million times since 2012.

Elastic and GCP-shared customers include eBay, The New York Times, Shopify, Verizon and Quizlet. For example, Quizlet, a leading online studying tool, moved to GCP in 2015 for our technology solutions, including Google Compute Engine, Google BigQuery and Google Cloud Storage. It uses Elasticsearch to index and query more than 4 billion terms with millisecond response time to help its 20 million users find and create online education content.

In addition to our work with partners like Elastic, we continue to invest in search for the enterprise, most recently with the introduction of Google Cloud Search, which harnesses machine intelligence to help businesses search internal information across G Suite.

With the Elastic partnership in place, we’re kicking off our joint engineering work and will start rolling out managed Elasticsearch on GCP later this year.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/X2kBe7I0ulQ/

Google Cloud Platform partners with Elastic to offer managed open source search and analytics on GCP

Category: Google | Apr 6, 2017

In the world of open-source search engines, Elasticsearch is certainly one of the most popular and powerful. The Elastic stack—Elasticsearch, Kibana, Beats and Logstash—offers search, log analysis and visualization for search, logging, security, metrics and analytics.

Today we’re announcing a new partnership with Elastic to bring managed support of its open source search and analytics platform to Google Cloud Platform (GCP), bringing joint customers high-performance global network and scale, increased security and privacy, data analytics and machine learning and the tools needed to build today’s modern applications.  

Openness is a key pillar of our partner philosophy and a driving force across Google. Embracing partnerships and working collaboratively with best-of-breed open source technology allows us to offer our customers choice and flexibility. We want GCP to be the best place to collaborate and solve problems using open source technologies.

With managed Elastic Cloud on GCP, developers get a hosted and managed Elasticsearch and Kibana offering, the latest versions of Elastic’s software, commercial features, including increased security, alerting, monitoring, graph and reporting, and support from Elastic engineers. This service will allow customers to more easily deploy, manage and scale Elasticsearch on GCP based on their specific needs.

Elastic’s solutions power web, mobile and application search and analytics experiences for some of the world’s biggest brands, and developers have downloaded Elastic’s products more than 100 million times since 2012.

Elastic and GCP-shared customers include eBay, The New York Times, Shopify, Verizon and Quizlet. For example, Quizlet, a leading online studying tool, moved to GCP in 2015 for our technology solutions, including Google Compute Engine, Google BigQuery and Google Cloud Storage. It uses Elasticsearch to index and query more than 4 billion terms with millisecond response time to help its 20 million users find and create online education content.

In addition to our work with partners like Elastic, we continue to invest in search for the enterprise, most recently with the introduction of Google Cloud Search, which harnesses machine intelligence to help businesses search internal information across G Suite.

With the Elastic partnership in place, we’re kicking off our joint engineering work and will start rolling out managed Elasticsearch on GCP later this year.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/8tcKNGKq3cs/

Google invests in INDIGO undersea cable to improve cloud infrastructure in Southeast Asia

Category: Google | Apr 5, 2017

Infrastructure is critical to the fabric of the internet, as well as to conducting business across the globe. For Google Cloud customers in particular, better internet means means better business operations, better user experiences and the ability to serve even more customers.

Many people are coming online across Asia, including businesses that depend on the cloud. That’s why it’s so important to enable better internet connectivity across the region, and why Google, alongside AARNet, Indosat Ooredoo, Singtel, SubPartners and Telstra, is building a new international subsea cable system in Southeast Asia, called INDIGO. The new cable system will serve Google traffic between Australia and Asia, connecting Perth, Sydney and Singapore, with a branch to Jakarta. Alcatel Submarine Networks will construct the cable, which is expected to be completed by mid-2019.

indigo-1

The new cable will span approximately 9,000 kilometers, and its two fiber pairs provide a design capacity of around 18 terabits per second (Tbps), with the option to expand in the future. At 18 Tbps, INDIGO provides enough capacity for people in Singapore and Sydney to join 8 million simultaneous high-definition Google Hangout video conference calls. This is just another example of Google Cloud’s remarkable network backbone—the largest of any public cloud provider.

indigo-2

INDIGO will be built by Alcatel Submarine Networks using a cable laying ocean vessel like this one. Image © Alcatel Submarine Networks

INDIGO opens up opportunities for people in the region and for Google Cloud customers. It’s the latest in our ongoing effort to improve Google’s connectivity to Asia; we’ve made seven submarine cable investments in total (this is our fifth in the region)—more than any other cloud.

indigo-3

Providing a reliable, secure internet for Google Cloud customers is a top priority for Google; we’ll continue to support efforts to improve internet infrastructure, in Asia and across the globe.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/Tp-EjbJ6Bfk/