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The High Five: the red carpet, a football field and other places visited in Search this week

Category: Google | Sep 15, 2017

Our trends this week center around a night of awards, a month of celebrations, and a lifetime of friendship. Read on for more top-searched trends, with data from the Google News Lab.

The day all your binge watching pays off

While Hollywood stars prepare their acceptance speeches for Sunday’s 69th annual primetime Emmy Awards, others are searching: “Which child actor has the most Emmys?” “Why isn’t Game of Thrones nominated for Emmys?” and “What TV show won the most Emmys?” There’s no telling who will take home that coveted golden statue, but so far, Donald Glover, Elisabeth Moss and Kevin Spacey are the most-searched nominees for lead actor/actress.

Now that’s true friendship

Pop star Selena Gomez revealed that she took time out of the spotlight this summer for a kidney transplant related to lupus. Search interest for Francia Raisa, Selena’s longtime friend who gave her the kidney, went up more than 9,000 percent this week. People turned to Google to find out how the pair of BFFs met and ask “Why did Selena Gomez need a kidney transplant?”

The ruling on the field is a fumble

If you didn’t already know who Sergio Dipp was, you probably do now—assuming you’re one of the many people who searched “Who is Sergio Dipp?” this week. The ESPN broadcaster made his Monday Night Football debut and stumbled through an awkward sideline report during the Broncos/Chargers game. Sergio’s tweet about newfound notoriety prompted us to look for other top searches about the topic of fame. Fame-seekers want to know “How to get Instagram famous,” “How did Adele become famous,” and “What is Benjamin Franklin famous for?” (One thing we know for sure: He did it without Instagram!)

Let’s look at the (Equi)facts

Last week’s Equifax data breach—which may have compromised the personal information of 143 million Americans—raised lots of questions about security. Search interest for “credit freeze” reached all an-time high this month, with related questions like, “What is the difference between a fraud alert and a security freeze?” and “How do I freeze my credit?” Specifically related to the Equifax breach, people are searching “How to find out if I was affected by Equifax?” and “How do I freeze my credit report Equifax?”

Hispanic Heritage Month

Today is the first day of National Hispanic Heritage Month, a celebration of people and cultures hailing from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. Top queries about the month-long tribute include: “How does the White House celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month?” “Who first declared a Hispanic Heritage Month?” and “Why is Hispanic Heritage Month celebrated on September 15?” Google is celebrating too—check out our Arts & Culture Exhibit and our Keyword series featuring some of our amazing Hispanic Googlers.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/SMbZHHqviMc/

Googler Susanna Kohly on “building digital bridges” in Cuba, her family’s homeland

Category: Google | Sep 15, 2017

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, we’re celebrating the fascinating stories and important contributions of our Hispanic Googlers. Over the course of the month, we’ll share a bit about their histories, their families, and what keeps them busy inside and outside of work. First up is Susanna Kohly, builder of “digital bridges,” San Francisco resident and mother of two boys (and mini Instagram celebrities).

Give us the ten-second, one-sentence version of what you do at Google.

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Here’s Susanna in Old Havana during a work trip this year.

My job has two parts (so I might need 20 seconds!). I work on the Hispanic Marketing team to help the 57 million U.S. Hispanics connect with Google as a company. Inspired by my Cuban heritage, I also co-founded Google Cuba, a team that brings greater access to connectivity, new technologies, and Google products to Cuba to “build digital bridges” between Cuba and the rest of the world.

When did you (or generations before you) immigrate to the U.S.?

I am a product of the Cuban diaspora. My mother is American, my father was born in Cuba, and I was born in Miami. I grew up speaking two languages, blending between two cultures and nationalities, so I understand the ambiguity of identity—how you can belong and not belong at the same time. This has helped me adapt to different environments and given me the ability to blend in, to understand, and to empathize. Growing up around other people who had left everything to make a new life for their families, I became obsessed with my own family’s story, Cuban history, and politics. I started reading and taking courses—anything I could learn that would make me feel closer to my heritage and where I came from.

Who has been the most influential person in your life?

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My Abuela (translation: grandmother) Carmen

My abuela Carmen—a mother of eight, an immigrant, and the matriarch of our family. Upon leaving Cuba, she sold every valuable thing she owned (including her wedding ring!) to provide for her family and put her kids through school. She worked three jobs, learned English, and has never complained about what she lost. Growing up, she told me stories of survival, and instilled in me a notion of hard work and sacrifice.  

I’m grateful to Google for giving me the opportunity to work on projects that bridge generations of Cuban people. My hope is that my two sons will have a sense of their own Cuban identity, just like my abuela made sure I had.  

Tell us about something you’re proud of doing at Google

In December 2016, I accompanied our Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt to Havana to sign the first-ever internet deal between Cuba and a U.S. internet company. The deal represented a barrier that hadn’t been bridged in more than five decades. I remember standing in the press room before the announcement, running on pure adrenaline and too much café Cubano. Despite our sheer exhaustion, the team was proud to help  to help set a precedent that will  hopefully open the door for more commercial and cultural exchanges between our two countries.

Like many Cuban-Americans, I feel a responsibility to reconnect with the island that our grandparents left. I’m a firm believer that we can grow stronger by working together as opposed to growing apart in isolation.

Like many Cuban-Americans, I have a responsibility to reconnect with the island that our forefathers left. I am a firm believer that we can grow stronger by working together.

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    An old photo taken in the family car, Havana 1947.
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    Susanna, Eric Schmidt, Brett Perlmutter and Florencia Bianco in Havana after announcing Google’s first internet deal with Cuba’s ISP monopoly, ETECSA.

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    Marketing VP Lisa Gevelber and Susanna during the Havana virtual reality launch of the documentary “Nuestro Martí,” where hundreds of school children experienced VR for the first time.

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    People sit in front of the a sign that reads ‘Con internet, yo puedo…” meaning “with internet, I can…”

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/W_U867x-lPk/

Get a closer look with Street View in Google Earth VR

Category: Google | Sep 14, 2017

With Google Earth VR, you can go anywhere in virtual reality. Whether you want to stroll along the canals of Venice, stand at the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro or soar through the sky faster than a speeding bullet, there’s no shortage of things to do or ways to explore. We love this sense of possibility, so we’re bringing Street View to Earth VR to make it easier for you to see and experience the world.

This update lets you explore Street View imagery from 85 countries right within Earth VR. Just fly down closer to street level, check your controller to see if Street View is available and enter an immersive 360° photo. You’ll find photos from the Street View team and those shared by people all around the world.

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If you need a fun place to start, check out a couple of our favorite spots. Make your way out to AT&T Park in San Francisco, or head to the Old Port in Westeros … er, Croatia to see King’s Landing from “Game of Thrones.

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The new version of Earth VR is available today for the HTC Vive and Oculus Rift. And if you don’t have one of those systems, you can still check out Street View in VR with your phone—just download the Street View app for Daydream and Cardboard.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/3fNmiN4scNI/

Ending FOMO with Community Updates

Category: Google | Sep 14, 2017

FOMO: that feeling you get when you fear you’re missing out on something super awesome, interesting or important to you: like a fun gig in the local park, an important school board meeting, or a community clean up down the road from your house.

Well, Community Updates could be your solution. It will bring you information about news and events happening right in your own backyard so you’ll always know what’s going on.

Even though Google News helps you understand what’s happening around the world, we realized that it wasn’t easy for people to get information about their own communities.

So we used machine learning techniques to find additional sources publishing local content— like hyperlocal bloggers and high school newspapers—and we realized these and other local sources deserved their own unique space. The redesign of the Google News earlier this year provided a place for this type of news to live—a tab at the top of the page called Local. That means everything from this outdoor donut and craft beer pairing event in Rochester, or students organizing a hackathon next door to the Googleplex at Mountain View High School, to this list of open restaurants and grocery stores in Houston during Hurricane Harvey will be easier than ever to find and keep tabs on.

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Community Updates are found under the “Local” tab on Google News.

Community Updates builds on the work we’ve been doing for the last decade in highlighting local information and publications (we first launched local sections in 2008). Last year we expanded to all 81 Google News editions and put a spotlight on local sources of national news.

We hope Community Updates will make Google News even more useful, so that you’re not worried about missing out on cool events and opportunities around you. At the moment this feature is only available in the U.S. in English on news.google.com and will be available in the Google News & Weather App later this fall. More information on Community Updates is available here. See our Publisher Center for more on Getting Into Google News.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/CmcJdFj8x_0/

Ending FOMO with Community Updates

Category: Google | Sep 14, 2017

FOMO: that feeling you get when you fear you’re missing out on something super awesome, interesting or important to you: like a fun gig in the local park, an important school board meeting, or a community clean up down the road from your house.

Well, Community Updates could be your solution. It will bring you information about news and events happening right in your own backyard so you’ll always know what’s going on.

Even though Google News helps you understand what’s happening around the world, we realized that it wasn’t easy for people to get information about their own communities.

So we used machine learning techniques to find additional sources publishing local content— like hyperlocal bloggers and high school newspapers—and we realized these and other local sources deserved their own unique space. The redesign of the Google News earlier this year provided a place for this type of news to live—a tab at the top of the page called Local. That means everything from this outdoor donut and craft beer pairing event in Rochester, or students organizing a hackathon next door to the Googleplex at Mountain View High School, to this list of open restaurants and grocery stores in Houston during Hurricane Harvey will be easier than ever to find and keep tabs on.

1

Community Updates are found under the “Local” tab on Google News.

Community Updates builds on the work we’ve been doing for the last decade in highlighting local information and publications (we first launched local sections in 2008). Last year we expanded to all 81 Google News editions and put a spotlight on local sources of national news.

We hope Community Updates will make Google News even more useful, so that you’re not worried about missing out on cool events and opportunities around you. At the moment this feature is only available in the U.S. in English on news.google.com and will be available in the Google News & Weather App later this fall. More information on Community Updates is available here. See our Publisher Center for more on Getting Into Google News.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/FLaS4OUdT5I/

Small business success at National Entrepreneurs Week in Mexico

Category: Google | Sep 14, 2017

Yesterday, the small business team at Google went to Mexico for National Entrepreneurs Week. It was exciting to hear stories about how some of Mexico’s four million small businesses—the second largest number in Latin America—are using the internet to succeed and grow. Let’s look at three ways these business owners have turned their passion into their life’s work.

Turning handmade clothes into a reliable income

Someone Somewhere helps indigenous women turn their craft—making clothes–into a reliable income. The organization uses Google My Business, a free way to create and enhance your business listing on Search and Maps, to help these women reach new customers and sell their art to people from Chiapas and Puebla to Baja, California. By adding inspiring photos, updated info, and more, business owners can make connections with their customers and earn their trust.

Google My Business now allows you to share updates on Search and Maps with Posts. If your menu changes, you have a seasonal sale, or you’re open for special hours on the holidays, you can post about it. Businesses that already use Posts are seeing great results—La Casa del Mendrugo, a restaurant in downtown Puebla, Mexico, got more than 80,000 views from a single post about their business.

A local florist created a striking website in under 10 minutes

Flores de Oaxaca used our free website builder to create an eye-catching site in under 10 minutes. And they are in good company, with the 90 thousand websites we’ve helped small businesses in Mexico build. By using the information from your Google My Business listing and providing simple templates, we make it easy to get your mobile-ready website up and running.

Having a website opened up a new world for us.

Dora Isabel

Founder of Flores de Oaxaca

A baker uses ads to connect with new customers

Once a business has a complete listing and an eye-catching website, it can reach more interested customers online with ads. When Pasteles Increibles started using AdWords Express, they went from getting 2 calls a day to getting 50.

AdWords Express helps small businesses set up a custom ad campaign in 15 minutes, and lets you choose the real-world results you want—calls, in-store visits, or website actions.

Small businesses have as many unique backgrounds and goals as the people running them. They use what makes them different to become the lifeblood of their communities, bringing jobs and character to the places in which they thrive. And I believe that together we can do more. Juntos podemos hacer más.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/QhZvl40sj08/

Small business success at National Entrepreneurs Week in Mexico

Category: Google | Sep 14, 2017

Yesterday, the small business team at Google went to Mexico for National Entrepreneurs Week. It was exciting to hear stories about how some of Mexico’s four million small businesses—the second largest number in Latin America—are using the internet to succeed and grow. Let’s look at three ways these business owners have turned their passion into their life’s work.

Turning handmade clothes into a reliable income

Someone Somewhere helps indigenous women turn their craft—making clothes–into a reliable income. The organization uses Google My Business, a free way to create and enhance your business listing on Search and Maps, to help these women reach new customers and sell their art to people from Chiapas and Puebla to Baja, California. By adding inspiring photos, updated info, and more, business owners can make connections with their customers and earn their trust.

Google My Business now allows you to share updates on Search and Maps with Posts. If your menu changes, you have a seasonal sale, or you’re open for special hours on the holidays, you can post about it. Businesses that already use Posts are seeing great results—La Casa del Mendrugo, a restaurant in downtown Puebla, Mexico, got more than 80,000 views from a single post about their business.

A local florist created a striking website in under 10 minutes

Flores de Oaxaca used our free website builder to create an eye-catching site in under 10 minutes. And they are in good company, with the 90 thousand websites we’ve helped small businesses in Mexico build. By using the information from your Google My Business listing and providing simple templates, we make it easy to get your mobile-ready website up and running.

Having a website opened up a new world for us.

Dora Isabel

Founder of Flores de Oaxaca

A baker uses ads to connect with new customers

Once a business has a complete listing and an eye-catching website, it can reach more interested customers online with ads. When Pasteles Increibles started using AdWords Express, they went from getting 2 calls a day to getting 50.

AdWords Express helps small businesses set up a custom ad campaign in 15 minutes, and lets you choose the real-world results you want—calls, in-store visits, or website actions.

Small businesses have as many unique backgrounds and goals as the people running them. They use what makes them different to become the lifeblood of their communities, bringing jobs and character to the places in which they thrive. And I believe that together we can do more. Juntos podemos hacer más.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/2tpNYQhcW2k/

Facts, trends and unheard voices: empowering journalists during the upcoming German election

Category: Google | Sep 13, 2017

For the News Lab, elections are opportunities to empower journalists with the technology and data they need to keep their readers informed. For the German election on September 24th, our efforts are formed around three key themes: promoting accurate content, offering data that provides helpful context, and surfacing unheard voices.

Guiding all of these efforts is a spirit of experimentation and collaboration with news partners to address the challenges and take advantage of the opportunities digital reporting presents.

Promoting accurate content

On September 4th, alongside Facebook, we began helping two organizations—First Draft and Correctiv—monitor misleading information during the German election. First Draft is a coalition of organizations dedicated to improving skills and standards in the reporting and sharing of information that emerges online. Correctiv is the first nonprofit investigative newsroom in the German-speaking world. Its fact-checking team started a few months ago and is a member of the International Fact Checking Network.

As a part of our partnership with Corrective, we funded and supported a team of journalists from across Germany called WahlCheck17 (Election Check 17). The team will work in a pop-up newsroom opened at the Corrective office to verify and fact-check online news stories and conversations in real-time during the final few weeks before the election. The team includes fact-checking experts from First Draft and Corrective, experienced students and graduates from the Hamburg Media School, and freelance journalists.

In the same vein as First Draft’s work on CrossCheck in France and our partnership with Full Fact during the UK general election in May, the WahlCheck17 team will alert German newsrooms by publishing a daily newsletter that lists the most popular rumors, manipulated photos and videos, and misleading articles and data visualizations circulating online, and offers additional context on the sources.

Using Trends to offer additional context

Google Trends offers insight into the candidates, parties, and moments that dominate the election campaign. Our new Google Trends election hub highlights search interest in top political issues and parties, with embeddable graphics that show what people across Germany have been most interested in throughout the election campaign.

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2Q17, a unique data visualization created by the renowned data designer Moritz Stefaner, depicts queries that Germans are searching for in relation to the top candidates. This project is part of Google News Lab’s series of visual experiments to develop innovative and interactive storytelling formats to cover important news moments.

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Surfacing unheard voices

During the French presidential election, the News Lab partnered with a publisher to surface the views of voters across France in 360. Now we’re working with Euronews on a similar project to surface unheard voices in Germany. In partnership with German regional media outlets, who will provide context on the socioeconomic conditions of their respective regions, this project will provide an immersive journey through Germany in the weeks leading up to the election. Watch the first episode starring Masih Rahimi, an Afghan migrant and IT trainee living in Passau.

At the News Lab, we strongly believe in the importance of quality journalism and the power of collaboration between tech and media companies to strengthen it. During elections, this is more important than ever. If you want to find out more about Google‘s efforts for the German election read our German blog.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/eK3_nTAwFLk/

Facts, trends and unheard voices: empowering journalists during the upcoming German election

Category: Google | Sep 13, 2017

For the News Lab, elections are opportunities to empower journalists with the technology and data they need to keep their readers informed. For the German election on September 24th, our efforts are formed around three key themes: promoting accurate content, offering data that provides helpful context, and surfacing unheard voices.

Guiding all of these efforts is a spirit of experimentation and collaboration with news partners to address the challenges and take advantage of the opportunities digital reporting presents.

Promoting accurate content

On September 4th, alongside Facebook, we began helping two organizations—First Draft and Correctiv—monitor misleading information during the German election. First Draft is a coalition of organizations dedicated to improving skills and standards in the reporting and sharing of information that emerges online. Correctiv is the first nonprofit investigative newsroom in the German-speaking world. Its fact-checking team started a few months ago and is a member of the International Fact Checking Network.

As a part of our partnership with Corrective, we funded and supported a team of journalists from across Germany called WahlCheck17 (Election Check 17). The team will work in a pop-up newsroom opened at the Corrective office to verify and fact-check online news stories and conversations in real-time during the final few weeks before the election. The team includes fact-checking experts from First Draft and Corrective, experienced students and graduates from the Hamburg Media School, and freelance journalists.

In the same vein as First Draft’s work on CrossCheck in France and our partnership with Full Fact during the UK general election in May, the WahlCheck17 team will alert German newsrooms by publishing a daily newsletter that lists the most popular rumors, manipulated photos and videos, and misleading articles and data visualizations circulating online, and offers additional context on the sources.

Using Trends to offer additional context

Google Trends offers insight into the candidates, parties, and moments that dominate the election campaign. Our new Google Trends election hub highlights search interest in top political issues and parties, with embeddable graphics that show what people across Germany have been most interested in throughout the election campaign.

7

2Q17, a unique data visualization created by the renowned data designer Moritz Stefaner, depicts queries that Germans are searching for in relation to the top candidates. This project is part of Google News Lab’s series of visual experiments to develop innovative and interactive storytelling formats to cover important news moments.

8

Surfacing unheard voices

During the French presidential election, the News Lab partnered with a publisher to surface the views of voters across France in 360. Now we’re working with Euronews on a similar project to surface unheard voices in Germany. In partnership with German regional media outlets, who will provide context on the socioeconomic conditions of their respective regions, this project will provide an immersive journey through Germany in the weeks leading up to the election. Watch the first episode starring Masih Rahimi, an Afghan migrant and IT trainee living in Passau.

At the News Lab, we strongly believe in the importance of quality journalism and the power of collaboration between tech and media companies to strengthen it. During elections, this is more important than ever. If you want to find out more about Google‘s efforts for the German election read our German blog.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/HrD869SClZI/

We went to Google with our daughters for the day. Here’s what we saw.

Category: Google | Sep 13, 2017

Editor’s Note: Every other year, Google hosts “Take Your Parents to Work Day,” when parents of Googlers visit the campus and get a glimpse of what it’s like to work there. There are lots of activities to keep the parents busy, and snacks to keep them fed. To mark the occasion, the proud moms of the Keyword editors stepped in to share their perspective of the day’s activities.

First day of Google

Gregoria (mom of Elisabeth): When my husband and I arrived on campus, it felt like first day of school—but  this time, our daughter was the one taking us by the hand. We spent the morning checking out the activities at the “expo,” starting at the CodeLab where, after a few minutes of tinkering, I realized that I needed a basic knowledge of HTML. That was the end of that, so we moved on to a lesson on mindful eating and then a demo from the Google Ergonomics team, who help Googlers set up their desks to make them as comfortable as possible. A piece of feedback for next year: let me take a Google Ergonomics specialist with me to my office! 

Lisbeth (mom of Emily): The atmosphere was festive: part open house, part Renaissance Faire. Stations to braid Google-colored ribbons into our hair or paint the green Android guy on our faces would not have seemed out of place. Proud but slightly dazzled parents trailed after their Googlers, listening as the young folks took charge. Photo ops and pink shirts were everywhere.

Gregoria: Speaking of photo ops, one of the best moments of the day was learning how to do a Boomerang.

Lisbeth: We marveled at the bravery of guests trying out silent disco [ed note: yes, we definitely had to explain what this was]. There was a station where people could record themselves speaking to help improve the Google Assistant’s voice recognition, and I lent my not-very-unusual voice patterns to the “Ok, Google…” database of pronunciation in English.

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HTML fail.

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Lisbeth checks out a Street View car.

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Photo opp with Android Oreo.

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On Take Your Parents To Work Day, we play with Google-shaped blocks.

Seeing the sights at the Googleplex

Lisbeth: We visited Stan, the T-rex; the bocce ball courts; the Oreo guy … the egrets! We shared some introductions with people we met along the paths and took turns taking each other’s photos. We ate lots of snacks.

Gregoria: You see the Google brand everywhere on campus, especially on the t-shirts of the happy, casually dressed Googlers. I love all the flair—the bikes, the adirondack chairs, a giant Android peeking out of the second floor of a building (I wonder what goes on in that building?), the many types of flavored spa water.

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Team meeting with parents in the room and on Google Hangouts.

Meeting of … the moms

Lisbeth: Emily and Elisabeth’s team had a special “parent edition” of their weekly meeting. Some parents even joined in via Google Hangouts. Now I have a better idea of where my Googler spends her days and a better feel for the personalities of her colleagues. Meeting other parents gave me another little window into the environments that shaped the team members. Listening to everyone describe​ themselves and​ their work was a favorite part of the event—second only to spending a whole day knocking around with my sweet Emily. 

Gregoria: For a lot of us parents it’s hard to understand what our kids do day-to-day at Google. I got a glimpse into my daughter’s work day and it was really special to see firsthand an environment that supports her and encourages her to grow and learn. I also enjoyed meeting the parents of her teammates—now I know why their children are brilliant!

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Elisabeth’s parents actually got to rest in the “rest-y things” before TGIF.

TGIF: the day ends in harmony

Gregoria: Lots of food trucks showed up before TGIF—Google’s weekly company-wide meeting—and per Elisabeth’s advice, we had to look at every truck before deciding what to order. After surveying our options, we listened to Googlepella, one of Google’s super talented a capella groups. Yes, Google has more than one a capella group … apparently we had just missed a performance from the Alphabeats. 

Lisbeth: Walking around before TGIF, I asked Emily, “What are those tents?” She replied, in her understated way​, “I think they’re just rest-y things.”

Lisbeth: We finished the day in the amphitheatre, where Sergey and Sundar fielded questions with quick wit and wisdom.

Gregoria: I admire a CEO who takes the time to answer questions from nosy parents. I liked the part of the presentation when they talked about the Google Assistant, which I downloaded on my iPhone. But I’m still waiting for my Googler to teach me how to use it …

Lisbeth: Google is still big and mysterious. The world’s future is uncertain as ever. But it is a comfort to know that smart, conscientious, dedicated people are working to meet the challenges we face.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/t3k5RYbdy4E/