News > Google


Six tips to make your photos pop

Category: Google | Mar 2, 2017

Sometimes taking a photo indoors results in a yellowish tint. Or on cloudy days, things can look too cold and unnaturally blue. We often turn to editing tools to correct these off tones, but don’t always have the time or expertise to white balance our photos.

Now, when you open the photo editor in Google Photos and select a look, we’ll not only correct exposure and saturation, we’ll also automatically correct the white balance in the image.  And if you want to tweak it even more, just go into Color and adjust the Warmth and Tint.

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Before auto white balance

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With auto white balance

Auto white balance in looks are rolling out this week on Android and web, and soon we’ll bring it to iOS. And while we’re in the spirit of getting your photos looking just right, we’ve rounded up a few handy editing tips.

Compare looks

As you scroll and select looks, long press on the image to see the original. After selecting a look, tap the look thumbnail again to adjust the strength.

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Quick rotate

If you need to rotate an image, you don’t even have to enter the editor. Just use the shortcut Shift+R on web. Or, in the Assistant tab of Google Photos, you may see suggested rotations for your sideways photos.

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More green?

We’ve shared how you can bring out blue in the sea or sky. If you want a vivid image with lush green, push the Saturation slider to the max, and bring down the intensity of the red and blue hues by decreasing the Skin tone and Deep Blue sliders respectively.

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Apply edits quickly on web

To apply the same set of edits to more than one photo, use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+C / ⌘+C to copy the edit, or select “Copy edits” in the overflow menu next to “Done.” You can then open another photo in the editor (use arrow keys to open next/previous), then use keyboard shortcut Ctrl+V / ⌘+V, or select “Paste edits” to apply them to the shot.

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Tap “A” to apply Auto Enhance; hold “O” to see the original image without edits applied; and tap “R” to enter crop mode.

Want to keep both your edited photo and the original?

Tap the overflow menu at the top right, and select “Save copy” to create a new version.

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From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/L-3oMZwS4cw/

Special delivery with Google Maps APIs

Category: Google | Mar 2, 2017

Customers care about convenience and expect fast responses, so a company’s ability to provide “last mile delivery”—quick, on-demand delivery service—can make or break its relationship with a customer. Asia-Pacific companies that rely on last-mile service are tapping into the cloud’s ability to amass and analyze data–specifically, using Google Maps to route drivers to the fastest path to a customer’s front door.

As customers demand even faster delivery—of everything from parcels to a hot dinner, the last mile of delivery is where customer relationships are strengthened—or weakened. Customers who request deliveries are doing so because convenience is important to them. Consumers expect faster deliveries at more convenient times, according to Accenture’s recent last-mile retail study. Asia-Pacific companies that rely on last-mile service are tapping into the cloud’s ability to amass and analyze data–specifically, using Google Maps to route drivers to the fastest path to a customer’s front door.

Committing to delivery windows

Swiggy, a local food delivery service based in India, delivers meals from restaurants in major cities like Bangalore and Delhi within a 40-minute delivery window. To make sure drivers can meet this commitment, Swiggy uses the Google Maps Distance Matrix API and Google Maps Places API to find and display only those restaurants that are within four to five kilometers of the customer. Once the customer places an order from one of the local restaurants, Swiggy uses the Google Maps Directions API to help drivers find directions to restaurants and customers.

special-delivery-1

Business is booming for Swiggy as a result of leveraging location data and the cloud to meet its delivery time commitment. Business has grown 25 percent per month, and nearly 80 percent of orders come from repeat customers.

Providing online estimates for delivery times

Bigbasket, India’s largest online food and grocery store, relies on mapping data too, but allows customers to choose a time window for delivery. For those who need their deliveries pronto, the company also offers an express service that delivers orders within 90 minutes.

When customers place orders on Bigbasket’s mobile app, they set their location on a Google map. The location determines the menu of products they are shown, as well as prices. Bigbasket used the Google Maps Javascript API to build a web-based app for the company’s backend that tracks all orders and delivery progress. Dispatchers use the Google Maps Directions API to match drivers with orders and customers, and the Google Distance Matrix API to estimate the time of arrival for deliveries.  The delivery recipe is working: Bigbasket has grown to four million customers, with more than one million orders every month.

Improving driver productivity and efficiency

For honestbee, an online concierge and delivery service based in Singapore, the last-mile goal was to improve driver and dispatcher efficiency. Using Google Maps, honestbee created a web-based map that shows the locations of drivers and their pickup and dropoff destinations.

The company uses the Google Distance Matrix API to build a batching engine, which automates dispatching drivers, and optimizes pickup and dropoff points. In instances where deliveries are too complex to be automatically handled by the batching engine, dispatchers match drivers with customers using a web-based map built with the Google Maps Javascript API.

special-delivery-2

Timely and speedy delivery plays a key role in customer satisfaction in today’s on-demand world. With accurate cloud-based mapping resources, merchants are finding ways to shave off precious minutes from last-mile delivery routes so customers keep coming back.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/6DzUKI67ozg/

Schools in Sweden have made Chromebooks nummer ett (number one)!

Category: Google | Mar 2, 2017

Editor’s note: We’ve seen strong momentum with Chromebooks worldwide, and today we reached a new milestone: Leading education analyst Futuresource has announced Chromebooks are the top-selling device across laptops and tablets for schools in Sweden. As we build out a new generation of Chromebooks with a world of apps for education, we are excited to see global educators lead this growth.

Technology is transforming the classroom experience worldwide, and in Sweden, schools are putting digital tools at the heart of learning. Sweden is embracing the power of innovative educational apps and digital learning throughout its education system—and Chromebooks are the device of choice.

A new report by Futuresource shows Chromebooks were the top-selling device across laptops and tablets in Swedish schools in 2016. According to the analyst firm’s data, Chromebooks now account for 38 percent of device sales in Swedish classrooms, up from 18 percent in 2015. Worldwide more than 20 million teachers and students are using Chromebooks and Google Classroom, and more than 70 million are using G Suite for Education.

This is significant. Sweden is a leading innovator in EdTech adoption—seeing Chromebooks achieve #1 shows Google's momentum within education.

Mike Fisher

Associate Director, Futuresource

Nordic countries are at the forefront of effective technology use in Europe, and Sweden is no exception. In 2011, Sweden established a Digital Agenda requiring that every student should “be able to use modern technology as a tool for knowledge-seeking, communication, creation and learning.” Digital Advisers have been appointed across municipalities to provide advice, centralized technical support and professional development programs for teachers.

Swedish educators say Chromebooks are now a core part of their students’ learning. “We have a one to one philosophy which means that every student has a Chromebook and that it is used to support learning, often in place of old books and pencils” said Jens Falkljung, IT Architect, Uddevalla Municipality.

We chose Chromebooks for their ease of use and the speed at which students can access their digital work.

Mats Johnson

Head of ICT, Malmo City Schools

More versatile Chromebooks and new content options

As global Chromebook momentum continues, this year at Bett we announced a new generation of Chromebooks for Education. These versatile devices bring even more mobility to a wider range of classrooms worldwide, including in the US where, according to Futuresource data, Chromebooks reached 58 percent of device sales in 2016.

Today we’re excited to announce HP is bringing its addition to the family with the HP Chromebook x360 11 G1 Education Edition, available in mid-April. HP’s rugged 360 degree convertible Chromebook will feature USB-CTM charging and optional stylus and world-facing camera capabilities designed for the specific needs of schools.

HP

These new devices—and the dynamic ecosystem of content and apps they support—help evolve technology usage into one that is anchored in student content creation. For example creative apps on Chromebooks are now available in Sweden and other European countries at a discount from select resellers. In addition, Chromebook administrators are now able to approve a library of Android apps and install them on select managed Chromebooks.

The role of technology in education will continue to grow in 2017 as students and teachers share their stories of digital success across the world. We’re proud to see Chromebooks at the centre of this transformation, powering global classrooms into the future.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/w47UM1Xceos/

Special delivery with Google Maps APIs

Category: Google | Mar 2, 2017

Customers care about convenience and expect fast responses, so a company’s ability to provide “last mile delivery”—quick, on-demand delivery service—can make or break its relationship with a customer. Asia-Pacific companies that rely on last-mile service are tapping into the cloud’s ability to amass and analyze data–specifically, using Google Maps to route drivers to the fastest path to a customer’s front door.

Committing to delivery windows

Swiggy, a local food delivery service based in India, delivers meals from restaurants in major cities like Bangalore and Delhi within a 40-minute delivery window. To make sure drivers can meet this commitment, Swiggy uses the Google Maps Distance Matrix API and Google Maps Places API to find and display only those restaurants that are within four to five kilometers of the customer. Once the customer places an order from one of the local restaurants, Swiggy uses the Google Maps Directions API to help drivers find directions to restaurants and customers.

special-delivery-1

Business is booming for Swiggy as a result of leveraging location data and the cloud to meet its delivery time commitment. Business has grown 25 percent per month, and nearly 80 percent of orders come from repeat customers.

Providing online estimates for delivery times

Bigbasket, India’s largest online food and grocery store, relies on mapping data too, but allows customers to choose a time window for delivery. For those who need their deliveries pronto, the company also offers an express service that delivers orders within 90 minutes.

When customers place orders on Bigbasket’s mobile app, they set their location on a Google map. The location determines the menu of products they are shown, as well as prices. Bigbasket used the Google Maps Javascript API to build a web-based app for the company’s backend that tracks all orders and delivery progress. Dispatchers use the Google Maps Directions API to match drivers with orders and customers, and the Google Distance Matrix API to estimate the time of arrival for deliveries.  The delivery recipe is working: Bigbasket has grown to four million customers, with more than one million orders every month.

Improving driver productivity and efficiency

For honestbee, an online concierge and delivery service based in Singapore, the last-mile goal was to improve driver and dispatcher efficiency. Using Google Maps, honestbee created a web-based map that shows the locations of drivers and their pickup and dropoff destinations.

The company uses the Google Distance Matrix API to build a batching engine, which automates dispatching drivers, and optimizes pickup and dropoff points. In instances where deliveries are too complex to be automatically handled by the batching engine, dispatchers match drivers with customers using a web-based map built with the Google Maps Javascript API.

special-delivery-2

Timely and speedy delivery plays a key role in customer satisfaction in today’s on-demand world. With accurate cloud-based mapping resources, merchants are finding ways to shave off precious minutes from last-mile delivery routes so customers keep coming back.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/tfzsjFIW1jM/

Schools in Sweden have made Chromebooks nummer ett (number one)!

Category: Google | Mar 2, 2017

Editor’s note: We’ve seen strong momentum with Chromebooks worldwide, and today we reached a new milestone: Leading education analyst Futuresource has announced Chromebooks are the top-selling device across laptops and tablets for schools in Sweden. As we build out a new generation of Chromebooks with a world of apps for education, we are excited to see global educators lead this growth.

Technology is transforming the classroom experience worldwide, and in Sweden, schools are putting digital tools at the heart of learning. Sweden is embracing the power of innovative educational apps and digital learning throughout its education system—and Chromebooks are the device of choice.

A new report by Futuresource shows Chromebooks were the top-selling device across laptops and tablets in Swedish schools in 2016. According to the analyst firm’s data, Chromebooks now account for 38 percent of device sales in Swedish classrooms, up from 18 percent in 2015. Worldwide more than 20 million teachers and students are using Chromebooks and Google Classroom, and more than 70 million are using G Suite for Education.

This is significant. Sweden is a leading innovator in EdTech adoption—seeing Chromebooks achieve #1 shows Google's momentum within education.

Mike Fisher

Associate Director, Futuresource

Nordic countries are at the forefront of effective technology use in Europe, and Sweden is no exception. In 2011, Sweden established a Digital Agenda requiring that every student should “be able to use modern technology as a tool for knowledge-seeking, communication, creation and learning.” Digital Advisers have been appointed across municipalities to provide advice, centralized technical support and professional development programs for teachers.

Swedish educators say Chromebooks are now a core part of their students’ learning. “We have a one to one philosophy which means that every student has a Chromebook and that it is used to support learning, often in place of old books and pencils” said Jens Falkljung, IT Architect, Uddevalla Municipality.

We chose Chromebooks for their ease of use and the speed at which students can access their digital work.

Mats Johnson

Head of ICT, Malmo City Schools

More versatile Chromebooks and new content options

As global Chromebook momentum continues, this year at Bett we announced a new generation of Chromebooks for Education. These versatile devices bring even more mobility to a wider range of classrooms worldwide, including in the US where, according to Futuresource data, Chromebooks reached 58 percent of device sales in 2016.

Today we’re excited to announce HP is bringing its addition to the family with the HP Chromebook x360 11 G1 Education Edition, available in mid-April. HP’s rugged 360 degree convertible Chromebook will feature USB-CTM charging and optional stylus and world-facing camera capabilities designed for the specific needs of schools.

HP

These new devices—and the dynamic ecosystem of content and apps they support—help evolve technology usage into one that is anchored in student content creation. For example creative apps on Chromebooks are now available in Sweden and other European countries at a discount from select resellers. In addition, Chromebook administrators are now able to approve a library of Android apps and install them on select managed Chromebooks.

The role of technology in education will continue to grow in 2017 as students and teachers share their stories of digital success across the world. We’re proud to see Chromebooks at the centre of this transformation, powering global classrooms into the future.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/OKMStDfJKzw/

Improvements to searching for special characters in programming languages

Category: Google | Mar 2, 2017

For those seeking answers to technical queries, Google just upped its search game. Now for queries containing sequences of 2-3 special characters such as [== vs ===] and [+=], Google will return results on the meaning of these sequences in programming languages.

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For example, if you’re searching for the meaning of [c++17], you will get results for the well-known programming language instead of c17, which brings up a Boeing airplane. Additionally, organization and product names that include punctuation, such as She++ and Notepad++, will return more accurate results.

Whether you’re a student looking to learn the basics of computer science or an engineer at a tech company, Google is now an even better resource to find information about various programming languages. We’ll continue to improve the experience over time for our fellow programmers and tech lovers out there because after all, we’re techies, too!

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/CcteMAKhAXo/

Improvements to searching for special characters in programming languages

Category: Google | Mar 2, 2017

For those seeking answers to technical queries, Google just upped its search game. Now for queries containing sequences of 2-3 special characters such as [== vs ===] and [+=], Google will return results on the meaning of these sequences in programming languages.

symbol_1.width-800.png

For example, if you’re searching for the meaning of [c++17], you will get results for the well-known programming language instead of c17, which brings up a Boeing airplane. Additionally, organization and product names that include punctuation, such as She++ and Notepad++, will return more accurate results.

Whether you’re a student looking to learn the basics of computer science or an engineer at a tech company, Google is now an even better resource to find information about various programming languages. We’ll continue to improve the experience over time for our fellow programmers and tech lovers out there because after all, we’re techies, too!

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/YyqbzV_Rjd0/

Smarter sharing in chat with Google Allo

Category: Google | Mar 2, 2017

Sometimes when you’re chatting with friends, GIFs speak louder than words. A fast response is everything, so we wanted to create a smarter way to share content quickly with friends in Google Allo. Today we’re introducing new features that help you express exactly what you mean, whether that’s through a GIF or animated emoji, or by using the Google Assistant.

allo1

A GIF library at your fingertips

A few months ago, we introduced a smarter way to help you find the perfect emoji or sticker without having to scroll through hundreds of options. Now, we’re making it easier to add GIFs to your conversations too—just tap the smiley icon in the chat bar and swipe left to find the right GIF for your chat.

To roll the dice with GIFs, we also recently introduced Lucky. Tap on a Smart Reply with the Lucky icon or type “@lucky” followed by a phrase, and you can share a randomly selected GIF to your friends. So far, lmaowow, and I love you are among the most used phrases with Lucky.

Bring your emojis to life

We’re guessing that you don’t keep a straight face when you hear a great joke. So why should emoji?! Step up your emoji game with new animated emojis in Google Allo. To animate your emoji, touch and hold the send button, and then drag up to see it come to life. This currently works on 10 emoji (try one of these: , , , , or ).

allo2

allo3

One tap to get help from your Google Assistant

The Google Assistant can help you share lots of information and content right in your chats, like movie showtimes, YouTube videos, or even pics of cats in hats (because why not?). So today we’re adding a shortcut to make it faster and easier to bring the Google Assistant into chats with friends. Just tap the Google Assistant icon in the compose box and your Assistant is ready to help.

These new features in Google Allo will be rolling out on Android starting today, and will come to iOS soon.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/-k49PAKVfG8/

Smarter sharing in chat with Google Allo

Category: Google | Mar 2, 2017

Sometimes when you’re chatting with friends, GIFs speak louder than words. A fast response is everything, so we wanted to create a smarter way to share content quickly with friends in Google Allo. Today we’re introducing new features that help you express exactly what you mean, whether that’s through a GIF or animated emoji, or by using the Google Assistant.

allo1

A GIF library at your fingertips

A few months ago, we introduced a smarter way to help you find the perfect emoji or sticker without having to scroll through hundreds of options. Now, we’re making it easier to add GIFs to your conversations too—just tap the smiley icon in the chat bar and swipe left to find the right GIF for your chat.

To roll the dice with GIFs, we also recently introduced Lucky. Tap on a Smart Reply with the Lucky icon or type “@lucky” followed by a phrase, and you can share a randomly selected GIF to your friends. So far, lmaowow, and I love you are among the most used phrases with Lucky.

Bring your emojis to life

We’re guessing that you don’t keep a straight face when you hear a great joke. So why should emoji?! Step up your emoji game with new animated emojis in Google Allo. To animate your emoji, touch and hold the send button, and then drag up to see it come to life. This currently works on 10 emoji (try one of these: , , , , or ).

allo2

allo3

One tap to get help from your Google Assistant

The Google Assistant can help you share lots of information and content right in your chats, like movie showtimes, YouTube videos, or even pics of cats in hats (because why not?). So today we’re adding a shortcut to make it faster and easier to bring the Google Assistant into chats with friends. Just tap the Google Assistant icon in the compose box and your Assistant is ready to help.

These new features in Google Allo will be rolling out on Android starting today, and will come to iOS soon.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/1RWjBROirHQ/

New research explores unconscious bias in the classroom

Category: Google | Mar 1, 2017

Although we often believe we act without bias or stereotyping, we’re all subject to unconscious biases: automatic, mental shortcuts we use to process information and make decisions quickly. These shortcuts are useful, but can also subtly and negatively influence our actions. And in the classroom, they can have serious consequences—educators could unintentionally discriminate against some of their students, discouraging them from pursuing certain fields of study.

Our latest research, done in partnership with Thomas Dee of Stanford University and Seth Gershenson from American University, found evidence of unconscious bias at play in classrooms. One study showed that when white and Black teachers evaluated the same Black student, white teachers were significantly more likely to perceive the Black student as disruptive, inattentive, and less likely to complete homework. Another study found that teachers perceived preschoolers’ misbehavior as worse when observing students of a race different than their own. At the college-level, one study showed that when female college students have a female math or science professor, they perform better in those classes and are more likely to engage with STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) subjects in the future.

To better understand this complex problem and how we might address it, we’re investing in two new research projects at University of California Berkeley and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. These projects will place an emphasis on the effects of teacher biases in computer science and STEM fields, where the underrepresentation of female, Black and Hispanic students is a longstanding concern.

At University of California Berkeley, Professor Jason Okonofua and his team of researchers want to know if teachers can become more empathetic when disciplining students. They hypothesize that helping teachers better understand the thoughts and feelings of their students will lead to a more fair and equal approach to disciplining students. The UC Berkeley researchers will develop and test an exercise to foster empathy among K-12 teachers at over 20 schools.

At Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Justin Reich and a team of researchers will simulate tough classroom situations to help teachers reflect, learn, and improve their practice. Example situations include one student dominating others during group work, putting his or her head down on the desk during a lab assignment, or taking out a cell phone during class. Each simulation culminates in a “volatile moment of instruction” to which the teacher must respond. The demographics of the students will be randomized to help teachers identify and observe where their unconscious biases might be influencing their responses.

Over the next two years, we will learn from these experiments, figure out what works, and share these findings with the education community. By focusing on educators, we can help them become aware of their unconscious biases and learn how they can adjust their actions to support diverse students in computer science and STEM. In the long run, we hope this research will create equality of opportunity for all students regardless of socioeconomic and demographic backgrounds.

To learn more about Google’s Computer Science Education Research, please visit g.co/cseduresearch

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/JqnwqnISSx8/