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Daydream View coming to stores November 10th

Category: Google | Nov 1, 2016

Last month, we announced Daydream View, a comfortable and easy-to-use virtual reality headset and controller powered by any Daydream-ready phone. It will be available November 10th on the Google Store and at retailers across five countries:

  • United States: Verizon, Best Buy; $79 (USD)
  • Canada: Bell, Rogers, Telus, Best Buy; $99 (CAD)
  • United Kingdom: EE, Carphone Warehouse; £69 (GBP)
  • Germany: Deutsche Telekom; €69 (EUR)
  • Australia: Telstra, JB Hi-Fi; $119 (AUD)

With Daydream View and a Daydream-ready phone like Pixel, you’ll be able to kick back in your personal cinema, explore new worlds and get in the game like never before. Take a look at some of the experiences that’ll be coming to Daydream over the next few weeks:

Your Personal Cinema

Hulu VR: Stream Hulu’s entire library of TV shows, movies and VR content. Plus, there will be two new pieces of VR content from Huffpo RYOT available exclusively on Daydream: a news program called “The Big Picture: News in Virtual Reality” and VR comedy show “Virtually Mike and Nora” starring Nora Kirkpatrick and Mike O’Brien. The Hulu VR app is available in the U.S.

Hulu VR on Daydream

YouTube VR: Watch the entire library of YouTube videos on a virtual big screen and experience immersive VR videos from top creators.

YouTubeVR

Google Play Movies: Enjoy thousands of popular movies and TV shows in your own virtual theater.

GooglePlayMovies

INVASION!: From the director of Madagascar, Invasion! is an award-winning VR animation narrated by Ethan Hawke that invites you to become part of the story. A pair of bumbling aliens, Mac and Cheez, plan to invade our Earth, but instead they are thwarted by the cuddliest animals on the planet.

Invasion

Explore New Worlds

Star Chart VR: From the Sun to the smallest moons of Saturn and out to the coldest, darkest, farthest reaches of Pluto, explore the solar system in a beautiful and accurate real-time space simulation.

Star Chart VR on Daydream

The Wall Street Journal VR: See breaking news and analysis in a whole new way with a real-time interactive market data visualization and interactive 360-degree videos.

WSJVR

Street View: Visit over 70 countries and experience 150 handcrafted tours of the world’s most amazing places. You can also search to explore your hometown and everywhere else.

Street View VR

The Guardian VR: Step into the shoes of an urban explorer and discover the hidden labyrinth of London’s Underworld – a subterranean web of Victorian sewers and lost waterways that lie active, deep beneath of one of the world’s most famous cities.

The Guardian on Daydream

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them: Wave a wand to explore the magic of Newt’s case, cast spells and solve puzzles to explore the world of the film in this VR experience.

FantasticBeasts

NYT VR: The New York Times will premiere three exclusive films in the Daydream app in its first month, including The Creators: Rob Pruitt. It follows Pruitt on a typical day in his life, with a visit to IKEA in Brooklyn where he purchases 27 plush pandas that’s a signature in his artwork.

NYTVR

Get in the Game

Danger Goat: One runaway goat, hundreds of dastardly traps in his way. Guide, slide and catapult the goat to freedom in this all-new VR puzzle game.

Danger Goat on Daydream

Hunters Gate: Blast your way through the town of Hunters Gate as you defend it from demon invasion – then take the fight to the demons by invading their home world.

Hunters Gate on Daydream

Wonderglade: Magically teleport to an ever growing theme park where you can enjoy carnival-themed classic games such as Tiny Tee Golf and Tip N Tilt Racing.

Wonderglade

Gunjack 2: End of Shift: With a formidable arsenal at your disposal, live the life of a Gunjack, protecting the Kubera and its precious cargo from the bandits trying to blow the rig apart!

Gunjack2

Mekorama: Help a tiny robot stumble home through 50 puzzling mechanical dioramas.

Mekorama

Need for Speed: No Limits VR: Race for dominance in the first Need for Speed title made for VR. Launch yourself between chaos and control as you hit the loud pedal and roll into underground car culture.

NeedforSpeed

Home Run Derby: Hit monster home runs and get crowned as your favorite MLB Home Run Derby All-Star.

HomeRunDerby

From hitting bat-breaking homeruns to journeying to the rings of Saturn, immerse yourself in high quality, mobile VR with Daydream View. Mark your calendar today for November 10th and follow us on Twitter and Google+ to get the latest on new apps and games coming to Daydream.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/cYfpKQbOwlw/

Ok Google, cast your spell

Category: Google | Nov 1, 2016

Now anyone can try their hand at magic with a little help from Google and the new Warner Bros. Pictures film set in J.K. Rowling’s Wizarding World, “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them.” Taking place decades before Harry Potter first arrives at Hogwarts, “Fantastic Beasts” follows the adventures of magizoologist Newt Scamander in a whole new era of the wizarding world — New York in 1926.

If you want to try being a wizard, try casting spells on your Android phone: Just say “Ok Google” followed by “Lumos” or “Nox” to turn your flashlight on and off. Try “Silencio” to silence the ringer and notifications.

FantasticBeasts_Lights.gif

You can also explore the world of “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” with Google Street View. Visit New York in 1926 as brought to life in the film, as well as the real locations today. Fans can visit MACUSA (Magical Congress of the USA); Steen National Bank, where Newt first meets Jacob Kowalski; the underground speakeasy The Blind Pig; and the magical apartment of Tina and Queenie Goldstein, two of the film’s key characters.

FantasticBeasts_ApartmentSV.gif

Once you’ve mastered charms and found the lay of the land, help Newt find his escaped beasts before they come to harm in a city already on edge from dark forces. Using our new Daydream View virtual reality headset, you can wave a wand to explore the magic of Newt’s case, a treasure trove full of everything he needs to cast spells, solve puzzles and find his beasts. The experience will be available when Daydream View goes on sale in November.

FantasticBeasts_DaydreamDemo.gif

Don’t forget to share your adventures with your friends by downloading an exclusive “Fantastic Beasts” sticker pack (coming soon) in our messaging app, Google Allo. You can also watch content inspired by the wizarding world from your favorite YouTube creators starting November 1.

To start your journey and discover more magic with Newt and friends, visit g.co/fantasticbeasts. “Fantastic Beasts” is in cinemas in November.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/XAS4tWkrT70/

The Phab 2 Pro brings over 35 new Tango apps to your phone

Category: Google | Nov 1, 2016

In June, we announced the first Tango-enabled phone with Lenovo, the Phab 2 Pro. The Phab 2 Pro utilizes Tango technology to give apps new augmented reality capabilities.

Over the last few months, we have worked closely with app developers to create a wide variety of smartphone based augmented reality apps. Our app incubator program supported a wide range of developers — from Crayola Color Blaster to Ghostly Mansions — to create new ways to do more, play more and explore more with your phone. You can experience these apps today with the Phab 2 Pro, available now on Lenovo.com.

Once you have your phone, just open the Tango app or Google Play to see all the Tango apps available for you to explore. Here are some of the experiences you can have with your Tango-enabled device:

  1. Measure anything in your home from your door frame to your desk with Measure.
  2. Visualize how furniture and appliances will look in your home with WayfairView, Lowe’s Vision, Homestyler Interior Design, and iStaging.
  3. Play dominoes anywhere without having to pack up the tiles later, with Domino World.
  4. Paint and draw on all the surfaces of your home with Crayola Color Blaster.
  5. Sling projectiles to battle a terrible dragon with Slingshot Island.
  6. Play with virtual pets with Raise.
  7. Learn about things that are hard to see with Solar Simulator and Dinosaurs Among Us.
  8. Build new digital worlds with Woorld and Towers for Tango.
  9. Race on your own personal race tracks with Hot Wheel’s Track Builder, Wild Wild Race and Car Racing.
  10. Customize your videos with exciting 3D filters with Spectra.

Tango

We see the potential for Tango technologies to be in every smartphone in the future. In the same way you wouldn’t consider buying a phone today without a camera or GPS, Tango will be a ubiquitous capability to help your phone better understand space and the world around you. There will be more Tango-enabled phones coming in the new year and we can’t wait for you to explore, learn and play.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/BeSj3ATScg4/

Uncovering the Truth Behind the Salem Witch Trials with Google Expeditions

Category: Google | Oct 31, 2016

As a teacher from Danvers, MA, a town once known as Salem Village, I have been teaching the Salem Witch Trials to my students for years. Students often have difficulty understanding the gravity of what happened in their own backyard until they see the sites themselves during their 4th grade local history tours.

This year, when it came to covering the trials in our classroom, we incorporated a lesson from Google Expeditions allowing students to go through the sites in Danvers tied directly to the Trials again, but this time virtually. Seeing these sites within the classroom gave our students context, allowing them to see the physical places where these events unfolded while we discussed them. This in-classroom experience facilitated a deeper conversation into the mentality of the time. Mandi, an 11th grade student, said that the Expedition “brought a whole new level of understanding to what we are learning”. “It’s almost like we’re there in person” added 11th grader Sarah.

[edu] SalemVillageBlog.jpg

Now, you don’t need to be in from Massachusetts to experience these sites. The new Expeditions invite you to explore the landmarks from the Trials including the Witch House, the home of Witch Trials Judge Jonathan Corwin, and The House of Seven Gables, which tells the story of the writer Nathaniel Hawthorne and his connection to the events of the Salem Witch Trials. This Halloween, students everywhere can take part in learning about this chapter of history.

Students can also experience a new Expedition for another holiday that falls this week, Day of the Dead. Dia de Muertos, or Day of the Dead, is a two-day holiday that is celebrated throughout Mexico when families honor the role of death in life and connect with those who have died. Far from being a sad occasion, Dia de Muertos is colorful, humorous, and joyful. In this Expedition, students can visit sites like the Mexico City Plaza de las Tres Culturas, The Museo de la Muerte and The Dolores Olmedo Museum.

[edu] DayoftheDeadBlog.jpg

This Fall, these Expedition experiences will allow students to explore their world and bring deeper meaning to their classroom discussions.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/wKnG8uISO44/

Spooky Street View Treats

Category: Google | Oct 31, 2016

Few places have more horrors than the Amsterdam Dungeons in the Netherlands. Enter the Dungeon and descend into the vaults for an unworldly immersive experience where actors take you through some of Amsterdam’s most terrifying tales. Quick, get your ticket! It’s a grueling good time.

If you like to feel shivers up your spine from a ghost trailing not so far behind, head over to the Winchester Mystery House in California, for a real twisted time. Mrs. Sarah L. Winchester built this creepy estate to escape ghosts that haunted her after the death of her husband a child. This one of a kind mansion contains miles of winding hallways, scattered with secret passageways hidden in the walls. It’s said that Mrs. Winchester traveled through the corridors in a roundabout fashion, to confuse any mischievous ghosts that might be following.

Haw Par Villa in Singapore is not your average theme park. Limbless rats, frogs riding ostriches, and the Ten Courts of Hell depicted by more than 1,000 statues and brightly painted dioramas, make up a gruesome recreation of the afterlife. A stroll through this disturbing park is an education in morality complete with morbid visuals, sure to to deter anyone from misbehaving.

No chilling tour is complete without a visit to the home of the deceased. The Cemetery of Dissidents is located on the Panteón hill, at one side of the old city jail, in Valparaíso, Chile. It was created in 1825 to hold the remains of those that differed from the official religion of the State. Take a stroll through the grounds and see tombstones that mince no words in revealing the adventurous lives and often dramatic deaths of its deceased residents.

You made it through the spookiest, the creepiest and the weepiest, so it’s now time to celebrate with some terrifying tunes! Wipe off that dusty cobweb covered boombox, throw your magic dancing shoes on, and join the monsters, the zombies and the vampires for a mashing good time. Happy Halloween!

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/tlxkFAZrIaw/

Recapping our support of Europe Code Week 2016

Category: Google | Oct 31, 2016

Interest in computer science education is booming across Europe, as it is being increasingly recognized as a critical part of a student’s academic preparation for the new global economy.  Yet not enough students are being given the opportunity to develop the technical skills necessary to allow them to be creators of future technological innovations. We want to do something about that. As part of our efforts to be a catalyst for developing the computer science education landscape, to encourage more school students to learn about computing, and to ensure that all of them have an opportunity to get the right skills, we participated in the European Commission’s, Europe Code Week 2016, initiative, which took place Oct 15-23.

To inspire students about future careers, we connected Googlers in our Zurich, Dublin and London offices virtually to students in classrooms from Ireland to Italy via Hangouts. This gave students an opportunity to interact with a Googler from their country despite the distance, to  hear from a professional in the tech field and ask lots of questions about how they got there.

Google Hangout Code Week 2016

Furthermore, we provided sponsorships to organizations who ran computer science outreach events: from Albania to Austria, Greece to Germany, and Spain to Serbia and in between, we were able to support 46 organizations in 29 countries who were doing innovative, inspiring and interactive things to get students excited about computer science.

In Ireland our awardees included Crana College, who ran their “Exploring Coding” event where students participated in a week of coding and programming related workshops, with plugged and unplugged activities.  In Italy, Fondazione Mondo Digitale ran “Simple Future” a training program based on coding aimed at students aged 6-18 from schools around Rome.

In Slovenia, Šolski center Nova Gorica ran an App Development with Android; In Turkey, Robincode ran “Code Your Dreams” with multiple sessions for four days to raise awareness of programming, coding and algorithmic thinking.

Other cool initiatives included Associació Eduin in Spain’s “Coding and robotics linking generations’ initiative to bring students and parents together to learn basic programming; Foundation Simplon’s Simplon.Kids in France and  Asociatia ADFABER’s Codeweek 4 girls event in Romania.

EU Code Week 2016 - 1

Photo credit: Foundation Simplon

EU Code Week 2016 2

Photo credit: Šolski center Nova Gorica

EU Code Week 2016

Students from Crana College, Buncrana, Co.Donegal, Ireland.. Photo credit: Thomas Boyle, Crana College


You can read more about the sponsorship recipients here. In total, Google supported 25,000 students to take part in coding experiences in just one week.

Overall, during Europe Code Week 2016 an incredible 20,000 events took place inspiring hundreds of thousands of students – an absolutely incredible effort!   We hope to see the enthusiasm continue. See Code Week’s events page to see all the different activities still happening, and learn more about Google’s effort in computer science education at g.co/csedu.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/vYf9-gSQxkI/

Saving Magic Cat Academy from catastrophe!

Category: Google | Oct 31, 2016

Hi, I’m Momo, a student at the illustrious Magic Cat Academy. Heading to class this morning, I thought it would be just like any other day: learn a few new spells, drink some milk, and hang out with my awesome animal and vegetable pals. To my Halloween horror, hundreds of angry ghosts have invaded the halls of my beloved school — fur real! And now, I ask you to join me to try your hand (or paw!) at fending off these ghastly ghosts with today’s Halloween Google Doodle.

halloweengif

With a swipe of your paw (or should I say wave of your wand), you can help turn these Halloween tricks into a real treat. But be warned, your spell casting must be quick and precise. To send these ghouls into a tailspin, you must draw the symbols that appear above the ghosts’ heads on your screen. Wow! Meow!

game demo

That’s not all: show your friends who’s the real expurrrrrt at casting spells by sharing your score after your sorcery is complete. After all, Halloween festivities are always more fun with your full litter!

goodwork

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/yoNS6rBR5vs/

It takes a teach to engineer the classroom for creativity

Category: Google | Oct 28, 2016

Editor’s Note: As part of our ongoing celebration of World Teachers’ Day, we’ll be sharing stories that demonstrate the creative power of teachers worldwide, building towards a global online gathering of educators on December 3: Education on Air. Register today. And join the movement by sharing what teachers mean to you with #ItTakesATeacher

For Matt Martin, a chemistry teacher at San Diego’s High Tech High, teaching has always been about  sharing his passion for science and discovery. Matt knew early in life that teaching would be the best way he could inspire others to experiment, solve problems and explore their natural curiosity. Matt shared with us how he fuels students’ excitement for science by emphasizing experiential projects and self-reliance in problem solving.

It takes a teacher to incubate mad scientists

Matt sets his classroom apart by emphasizing the engineering design process (EDP), which is the central theme for his curriculum this year. This project-based approach to learning gives students room to fail and encourages them to analyze their results, regardless of the outcome. For his annual Mad Scientist project students designed and conducted their own experiments, such as building their own fireworks and igniting substances underwater. By discouraging duplicate projects and sourcing project ideas from the students, Matt brings creativity to the forefront. “You get to see all kinds of things changing color, growing — even creating colored fire,” he says.

While every teacher aims to engage and encourage their students, Matt’s teaching style enables students to learn through experimentation, problem solving and critical analysis. He emphasizes self-reliance while giving students the tools to problem solve themselves. “I learned how to persevere through my mistakes & grow confident as a student from the freedom given in Matt’s class.” said Savand, one of Matt’s senior students.

“I’m in awe of science and I love spreading that knowledge,” Matt says. By combining principles of engineering, an emphasis on student collaboration, and his contagious love of science, Matt created something larger: genuinely creative and curious students.

It takes a teacher to take smart risks

Matt looks to his school director, Robert, who functions as principal, for inspiration and guidance. “Robert really tries to cut through the nonsense and do what’s best for students,” Matt said. “He always encourages us and supports us in taking risks.”

This ethos of taking smart risks was put to the test when Matt and his students came up with a bold idea. They wanted to evolve one of their classroom projects —  making soap out of lye —  into a full-fledged business. Undaunted by the challenge of starting a company, Matt’s  students began researching different ways to get their business online. After weeks spent huddling around Chromebooks and poring over Google Docs of potential vendors, Wicked Soap Company was born. With help from some real-world scholars, John Cahalin and Elyse Burden, Wicked Soap Company has grown into a self-sustaining enterprise. “I’ve loved the opportunity to work with my classmates to run a business,” said Sophie, a sophomore student in Matt’s class. “Matt helps make chemistry fun.”

7G7A4547.jpg

Matt’s students making soap

The engineering and design principles Matt instills in his students reflect his love for making new things. When Matt and his wife moved into a new home this summer, he embarked on a home improvement project, leveling ground and importing bricks and tile to build a patio in the backyard. “I like to create and work with my hands,” Matt said. “If I find something I’ve never done before, I’ll experiment and try it out.”

Matt loves when his students come to him with creative ideas, and works with them to turn these concepts into tangible results. When one of his students wanted to see if the class could make bath bombs, Matt helped the students iterate and discover the best way to create them. His ability to turn students’ ideas into teachable lessons sets Matt apart from his peers.

To hear from Matt live, join us for Education on Air on December 3rd.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/7kDr542_I2s/

It takes a teacher to engineer the classroom for creativity

Category: Google | Oct 28, 2016

Editor’s Note: As part of our ongoing celebration of World Teachers’ Day, we’ll be sharing stories that demonstrate the creative power of teachers worldwide, building towards a global online gathering of educators on December 3: Education on Air. Register today. And join the movement by sharing what teachers mean to you with #ItTakesATeacher

For Matt Martin, a chemistry teacher at San Diego’s High Tech High, teaching has always been about  sharing his passion for science and discovery. Matt knew early in life that teaching would be the best way he could inspire others to experiment, solve problems and explore their natural curiosity. Matt shared with us how he fuels students’ excitement for science by emphasizing experiential projects and self-reliance in problem solving.

It takes a teacher to incubate mad scientists

Matt sets his classroom apart by emphasizing the engineering design process (EDP), which is the central theme for his curriculum this year. This project-based approach to learning gives students room to fail and encourages them to analyze their results, regardless of the outcome. For his annual Mad Scientist project students designed and conducted their own experiments, such as building their own fireworks and igniting substances underwater. By discouraging duplicate projects and sourcing project ideas from the students, Matt brings creativity to the forefront. “You get to see all kinds of things changing color, growing — even creating colored fire,” he says.

While every teacher aims to engage and encourage their students, Matt’s teaching style enables students to learn through experimentation, problem solving and critical analysis. He emphasizes self-reliance while giving students the tools to problem solve themselves. “I learned how to persevere through my mistakes & grow confident as a student from the freedom given in Matt’s class.” said Savand, one of Matt’s senior students.

“I’m in awe of science and I love spreading that knowledge,” Matt says. By combining principles of engineering, an emphasis on student collaboration, and his contagious love of science, Matt created something larger: genuinely creative and curious students.

It takes a teacher to take smart risks

Matt looks to his school director, Robert, who functions as principal, for inspiration and guidance. “Robert really tries to cut through the nonsense and do what’s best for students,” Matt said. “He always encourages us and supports us in taking risks.”

This ethos of taking smart risks was put to the test when Matt and his students came up with a bold idea. They wanted to evolve one of their classroom projects —  making soap out of lye —  into a full-fledged business. Undaunted by the challenge of starting a company, Matt’s  students began researching different ways to get their business online. After weeks spent huddling around Chromebooks and poring over Google Docs of potential vendors, Wicked Soap Company was born. With help from some real-world scholars, John Cahalin and Elyse Burden, Wicked Soap Company has grown into a self-sustaining enterprise. “I’ve loved the opportunity to work with my classmates to run a business,” said Sophie, a sophomore student in Matt’s class. “Matt helps make chemistry fun.”

7G7A4547.jpg

Matt’s students making soap

The engineering and design principles Matt instills in his students reflect his love for making new things. When Matt and his wife moved into a new home this summer, he embarked on a home improvement project, leveling ground and importing bricks and tile to build a patio in the backyard. “I like to create and work with my hands,” Matt said. “If I find something I’ve never done before, I’ll experiment and try it out.”

Matt loves when his students come to him with creative ideas, and works with them to turn these concepts into tangible results. When one of his students wanted to see if the class could make bath bombs, Matt helped the students iterate and discover the best way to create them. His ability to turn students’ ideas into teachable lessons sets Matt apart from his peers.

To hear from Matt live, join us for Education on Air on December 3rd.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/7kDr542_I2s/

“Stranger Things” are happening in Google Allo

Category: Google | Oct 28, 2016

Mind control. Demogorgons. Barb. This Halloween, there’s no question we’ll see people out in costume as characters from this summer’s addictive Netflix original series, “Stranger Things.” To help bring you back into the ‘80s supernatural mindset, we’re partnering with Netflix to bring the Upside Down right to your chats in Google Allo, our smart messaging app for Android and iOS.

A new “Stranger Things” sticker pack is now available for download in Google Allo, featuring exclusive artwork inspired by the show. So whether you’re researching how to create a DIY Eleven costume with friends or debating whether Barb will reappear in season two, we got you covered.

533x800-Blogpost.gif

These stickers aren’t the only new thing in Google Allo this week. You can now reply to messages directly from your notifications on Android and iOS. So if you’re cooking up a French Onion Barb, you don’t have to stop what you’re doing to reply back to friends.

03-box-transparent hi res.png

We’ve also added support for Android N so you can take advantage of its features. With split-screen mode you can now chat with friends and rewatch season one at the same time. App shortcuts help you quickly start a new conversation from the home screen. And for iOS users, we’ve brought the ability to doodle on your photos to iOS, so you can craft a masterpiece before sharing in Google Allo.

Beware the flickering lights, and have a safe and happy Halloween!

P.S. Google Allo will help you unlock your powers today in New York City. Stay tuned to Google on Twitter for a hint on where the drop-off from Hawkins National Laboratories will take place.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/LhpOnfqLbo0/