News > Google


Hey Canada, get tappin’ this spring with Android Pay

Category: Google | May 31, 2017

T-shirt. Check. Flip flops. Check. Android phone. Check.  

As Canadians exchange parkas and scarves for t-shirts and flip flops this spring, we have some news that may lighten their pockets, too. Whether you’re heading out to buy groceries or grabbing a cup of coffee with friends, now your Android phone is all you need to walk out the door.

Today, we’re beginning to roll out Android Pay across Canada to help you pay simply and securely in stores and in apps.

We’ll be rolling out support for top banks over the next several days, and this is just the beginning. We will continue to add even more features, banks and store locations in the coming months, making it even easier to pay with your Android phone.

Android Pay: A Clerk's Life

Now, you’ll be able to use Android Pay at hundreds of thousands of shops that accept contactless payments, like Tim Hortons, Loblaws, Petro-Canada, McDonald’s, Indigo, Pizza Pizza, Sears Canada and in TELUS, Rogers, and Freedom Mobile retail stores. Just tap with your phone as you would with your participating credit, debit or prepaid card. It’s that simple.

CA_stores

You’ll also be able to breeze through checkout in your favorite apps, including Lululemon, Uber, Ritual, HotelTonight, and more. Just look for the Android Pay button, and say goodbye to entering your payment and address details each time you buy.

CA_apps

Android Pay also stores your gift cards, loyalty cards and special offers right on your phone.

How does Android Pay work? 

Using Android Pay is simple. Just wake up your phone (you don’t even have to open an app or unlock it), hold it near the payment terminal, and voilà—your payment is done. After you check out, you’ll get helpful information on your phone about your recent transactions.

CA hero

To get started, install the Android Pay app from the Google Play Store. It’s available on all Android devices that are NFC-enabled, supporting Google Play Services, and running on KitKat 4.4 or higher. Simply open, set up, and get tapping.

Over the next several days, Android Pay is rolling out with support from eligible Visa and MasterCard credit cards from BMO Bank of Montreal, CIBC, Banque Nationale, Scotiabank, Desjardins, President’s Choice Financial, ATB Financial, and Canadian Tire Financial Services in Canada, and prepaid Scotiabank and Desjardins cards. Support for Interac-branded debit cards will begin roll-out on Monday, and support for American Express cards and Tangerine is coming later this summer. You can add multiple eligible cards and select which card you want to use before you pay, so you can always enjoy the best deals available.

CA_banks

We’ve teamed up with many leading payment platforms, processors, and technology providers such as Moneris, Bambora, Chase, Cybersource, First Data, Global Payments, Paysafe, WorldPay and Stripe to make it even easier to accept Android Pay. Visit the Android Pay API developer site to learn more.

CA_processors

Happy shopping!

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/dDBkp3ZNDPE/

Searching for art just got better. Where will you start?

Category: Google | May 31, 2017

While some are drawn to the strong brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s The Starry Night, others prefer gazing at the gilded glory of Klimt’s The Kiss, but one thing is certain: people love art. In fact, each month, there are more than 500 million art-related searches on Google. Now whether you’re a casual fan or a true culture vulture, Google can help you become an art expert. Starting today, when you search for art-related things, you’ll have access to more relevant results and the ability to dive deeper into topics of interest. We’ve also added a new feature in Street View (think digital museum guide!) that gives you key insights about the artworks on your virtual museum visits.

Explore more art right from Google Search

To help make your search for art a masterpiece, the Google Arts & Culture team joined forces with Google Search engineers to improve how our systems understand and recognize artworks, the places you can see them in person, the artists who made them, the materials they used, the art period they belong to and the connections among all these.

Now when you search an artist like Gustav Klimt, you’ll see an interactive Knowledge Panel that will highlight ways you can explore on a deeper level, like seeing a collection of the artist’s works or even scrolling through the museums where you can view the paintings on the wall. And for some pieces, you can click through to see picture-perfect high-resolution imagery right from Google Arts & Culture.

searching for art

Google Arts & Culture, your virtual museum guide

You can visit hundreds of museums around the world right from your laptop with Google Maps and Google Arts & Culture. And starting today your virtual Street View tour is more informative on desktop and in the Chrome browser on mobile. Now as you walk through the rooms of the museums on Google Maps you’ll see clear and useful annotations on the wall next to each piece. Clicking on these annotations will bring you to a new page with more information provided by hundreds of the world’s renowned museums. You’ll also be able to zoom into high-resolution imagery—getting you closer to these iconic works than you ever thought possible.

To create this feature, we put our visual recognition software to work. Similar to how machine learning technology in Google Photos allows you to search for things in your gallery, this software scanned the walls of participating museums all over the world, identifying and categorizing more than 15,000 works.

Searching for art just got better. Where will you start?

Discovering the art world has never been easier on Google, and we hope this inspires you to brush up on your art knowledge. So take a moment. Dive in. Who knows—with a stroke of luck, you may find yourself drawn…to art!

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/lwdNA2L9Zss/

Cheers to Street View’s 10th birthday!

Category: Google | May 30, 2017

Street View started out as Larry Page’s far-fetched idea to create a 360-degree map of the world. Today, 10 years after the first imagery was published in Street View, people can scale mountains, dive into the depths of the ocean, scout out ramen spots, and walk through museums in far corners of the world. Over the last decade, a lot has changed—the technology we use, the appearance of the planet—but the goal of Google Maps has remained the same: to help you navigate and discover new corners of the world. Now raise your glass (or smartphone), and cheers to Street View’s 10th birthday!

Mont Blanc

Mont Blanc 

Ramen Alley

Ramen Alley 

Great Barrier

Great Barrier Reef

National Museum of Iraq

National Museum of Iraq

el Cap

El Capitan, Yosemite 

Let’s hop inside our time machine and see where it all began. Larry kicked off the first prototype in 2004 with a team of Googlers who were passionate about his idea to create a 360-degree view of the world. They tossed cameras on a van, added some lasers (okay maybe it was a bit more complicated than that), and the first Street View car was born. In 2006, Street View officially hit the roads in a few cities across the U.S. and the first imagery was published in May 2007. Ten years later, we’ve published imagery on every continent, in 83 countries, and traveled about 10 million miles with the Street View car. Talk about a roadtrip.

Timeline updated

While our cars explored streets around the world, we were still missing out on some of the most beautiful places on Earth: the world that exists beyond the roads. So we developed custom vehicles, like the Street View Trekker, to go where cars couldn’t go. The Trekker is designed to be worn and walked through narrow alleyways or trails, gathering images as it goes. Its traveled to breathtaking natural wonders and world heritage sites—Grand Canyon, the Taj Mahal, Angkor Wat, the Galapagos Islands and even the historic pedestrian paths in Venice. And it’s been used by conservation organizations to observe wildlife, like elephants, chimps, polar bears, and frogs in the Amazon, in their natural habitat. Over the years we’ve put Street View cameras on a snowmobile to bring you closer to the Arctic Eiders, the back of a camel to roam the Arabian desert, and a trolley to give you a better view of renowned works of art.

Trekker 1

Perito Moreno Glacier, Argentina 

Trekker off road

Faroe Islands, Denmark

Grand Canyon

Grand Canyon, USA 

Angkor

Angkor Wat, Cambodia 

Galopagos

Galapagos 

Samburu

Samburu, Kenya 

To build our map of the world faster, in 2013 we enlisted the help of partners through the Trekker Loan Program. We gave volunteers Street View cameras, which they used to collect 360-degree imagery of the local places they know best. Then the Street View App came along in 2015, so that anyone could publish photo spheres (360-degree panoramas) of their favorite places from around the world—or around the block—to Google Maps in an instant. We expanded on this last month, when we announced more than 20 new Street View-compatible 360 cameras, to help you document your adventures with high quality imagery. Now anyone—from tourism organizations to local neighborhood enthusiast—can contribute panoramic imagery to Street View.

User Generated Faroe

Faroe Islands 

Over the years we’ve learned that the possibilities for Street View are endless. Here are a few of our favorite spots:

Cats

Cats collect! 

Northern Lights

The Northern Lights, Finland 

Volcano

Ambrym, Vanuatu 

Machu Puch

Machu Picchu, Peru 

Umbrellas

Umbrella Forest 

Stone Henge

Stonehenge, U.K.

The world is better explored than explained. Street View gives you a taste of the places you’ll see in person one day, helps you remember the places you’ve been, and enables you to explore the places you might never get to. So pick up your phone and take a peek. Many wonders await.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/ezdav1XsM3c/

Preserving digital art: How will it survive?

Category: Google | May 30, 2017

For millennia, people have created art—in media ranging from paint on cave walls to metal or stone sculpture to computer-generated images, sound and motion. In recent years, many have made an effort to digitize physical art in an effort to preserve it for future generations and make it accessible to a wider audience. And many contemporary artists have produced creative works using digital media, to be experienced completely online. Yet while the cave paintings in Lascaux are an incredible 20,000 years old, it isn’t clear whether digitized images of that art—or any digital art created today—will last 20 years, let alone 20,000.

That’s because digital art requires readers and, often, software in order to to be viewed, heard or experienced. And as software, browsers, and files either update versions or become obsolete, both digital art—art produced by means of computers and software—and digitized art—reproduced or copied art, rendered in digital form from original physical media—are at risk of disappearing.

Contrary to common belief that “bits don’t die,” obsolescence is a real threat to digital art—and a major challenge as its use continues to increase. Just as preservationists have identified ways to extend the life of pigment, canvas and stone, solutions must be found to assure the longevity of digital works or they may prove to be even less resilient than their physical counterparts.

It’s with this in mind that Google Arts & Culture has partnered with Rhizome to help in the preservation of digital art. Rhizome grew out of the blossoming web-artist community of the mid-1990s, and is now a thriving nonprofit in New York City. They’ve developed unique tools which preserve digital artworks and allow them to viewed long after their complex, software foundations have become obsolete.

Rhizome’s tools are already preserving a growing number of digital-born artworks, and together we’re making them accessible online for free. You can explore these works starting today on Google Arts & Culture, including exhibits on 20-year-old landmark computer games for girls, how the design of early Internet browsers organized user interaction, and the “first Instagram masterpiece?

Last month, Google Arts & Culture brought together key researchers in preservation, curation and computer science along with digital artists for an event in London to examine the current state of digital art preservation. Starting with a keynote conversation between me and Dragan Espenschied, Rhizome’s preservation specialist, panelists spoke on topics ranging from distribution and preservation of artistic software to community-based preservation.

Vint Cerf Digital Art

As we witness physical works of art destroyed by war and the passage of time around the world, we know how important preservation is. The same is true for creative expressions online—and we must look for new solutions together.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/ky7JN_bV_rE/

Preserving digital art: How will it survive?

Category: Google | May 30, 2017

For millennia, people have created art—in media ranging from paint on cave walls to metal or stone sculpture to computer-generated images, sound and motion. In recent years, many have made an effort to digitize physical art in an effort to preserve it for future generations and make it accessible to a wider audience. And many contemporary artists have produced creative works using digital media, to be experienced completely online. Yet while the cave paintings in Lascaux are an incredible 20,000 years old, it isn’t clear whether digitized images of that art—or any digital art created today—will last 20 years, let alone 20,000.

That’s because digital art requires readers and, often, software in order to to be viewed, heard or experienced. And as software, browsers, and files either update versions or become obsolete, both digital art—art produced by means of computers and software—and digitized art—reproduced or copied art, rendered in digital form from original physical media—are at risk of disappearing.

Contrary to common belief that “bits don’t die,” obsolescence is a real threat to digital art—and a major challenge as its use continues to increase. Just as preservationists have identified ways to extend the life of pigment, canvas and stone, solutions must be found to assure the longevity of digital works or they may prove to be even less resilient than their physical counterparts.

It’s with this in mind that Google Arts & Culture has partnered with Rhizome to help in the preservation of digital art. Rhizome grew out of the blossoming web-artist community of the mid-1990s, and is now a thriving nonprofit in New York City. They’ve developed unique tools which preserve digital artworks and allow them to viewed long after their complex, software foundations have become obsolete.

Rhizome’s tools are already preserving a growing number of digital-born artworks, and together we’re making them accessible online for free. You can explore these works starting today on Google Arts & Culture, including exhibits on 20-year-old landmark computer games for girls, how the design of early Internet browsers organized user interaction, and the “first Instagram masterpiece?

Last month, Google Arts & Culture and Rhizome brought together key researchers in preservation, curation and computer science along with digital artists for an event in London to examine the current state of digital art preservation. Starting with a keynote conversation between me and Dragan Espenschied, Rhizome’s preservation specialist, panelists spoke on topics ranging from distribution and preservation of artistic software to community-based preservation.

Vint Cerf Digital Art

As we witness physical works of art destroyed by war and the passage of time around the world, we know how important preservation is. The same is true for creative expressions online—and we must look for new solutions together.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/2Wp193QyoWM/

Cheers to Street View’s 10th birthday!

Category: Google | May 30, 2017

Street View started out as Larry Page’s far-fetched idea to create a 360-degree map of the world. Today, 10 years after the first imagery was published in Street View, people can scale mountains, dive into the depths of the ocean, scout out ramen spots, and walk through museums in far corners of the world. Over the last decade, a lot has changed—the technology we use, the appearance of the planet—but the goal of Google Maps has remained the same: to help you navigate and discover new corners of the world. Now raise your glass (or smartphone), and cheers to Street View’s 10th birthday!

Mont Blanc

Mont Blanc 

Ramen Alley

Ramen Alley 

Great Barrier

Great Barrier Reef

National Museum of Iraq

National Museum of Iraq

el Cap

El Capitan, Yosemite 

Let’s hop inside our time machine and see where it all began. Larry kicked off the first prototype in 2004 with a team of Googlers who were passionate about his idea to create a 360-degree view of the world. They tossed cameras on a van, added some lasers (okay maybe it was a bit more complicated than that), and the first Street View car was born. In 2006, Street View officially hit the roads in a few cities across the U.S. and the first imagery was published in May 2007. Ten years later, we’ve published imagery on every continent, in 83 countries, and traveled about 10 million miles with the Street View car. Talk about a roadtrip.

Timeline

While our cars explored streets around the world, we were still missing out on some of the most beautiful places on Earth: the world that exists beyond the roads. So we developed custom vehicles, like the Street View Trekker, to go where cars couldn’t go. The Trekker is designed to be worn and walked through narrow alleyways or trails, gathering images as it goes. Its traveled to breathtaking natural wonders and world heritage sites—Grand Canyon, the Taj Mahal, Angkor Wat, the Galapagos Islands and even the historic pedestrian paths in Venice. And it’s been used by conservation organizations to observe wildlife, like elephants, chimps, polar bears, and frogs in the Amazon, in their natural habitat. Over the years we’ve put Street View cameras on a snowmobile to bring you closer to the Arctic Eiders, the back of a camel to roam the Arabian desert, and a trolley to give you a better view of renowned works of art.

Trekker 1

Perito Moreno Glacier, Argentina 

Trekker off road

Faroe Islands, Denmark

Grand Canyon

Grand Canyon, USA 

Angkor

Angkor Wat, Cambodia 

Galopagos

Galapagos 

Samburu

Samburu, Kenya 

To build our map of the world faster, in 2013 we enlisted the help of partners through the Trekker Loan Program. We gave volunteers Street View cameras, which they used to collect 360-degree imagery of the local places they know best. Then the Street View App came along in 2015, so that anyone could publish photo spheres (360-degree panoramas) of their favorite places from around the world—or around the block—to Google Maps in an instant. We expanded on this last month, when we announced more than 20 new Street View-compatible 360 cameras, to help you document your adventures with high quality imagery. Now anyone—from tourism organizations to local neighborhood enthusiast—can contribute panoramic imagery to Street View.

User Generated Faroe

Faroe Islands 

Over the years we’ve learned that the possibilities for Street View are endless. Here are a few of our favorite spots:

Cats

Cat’s Collect! 

Northern Lights

The Northern Lights, Finland 

Volcano

Ambrym, Vanuatu 

Machu Puch

Machu Pichu, Peru 

Umbrellas

Umbrella Forest 

Stone Henge

Stone Henge, UK

The world is better explored than explained. Street View gives you a taste of the places you’ll see in person one day, helps you remember the places you’ve been, and enables you to explore the places you might never get to. So pick up your phone and take a peek. Many wonders await.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/7-1STu-Uvgg/

Ready for Ramadan? We are.

Category: Google | May 29, 2017

Every year around Ramadan, people turn to Search with questions like “What is Ramadan?” or “Why do Muslims fast in the summer?” For those who celebrate Ramadan, the questions can be a bit more complex: “When is Iftar in Finland?” or “How do I stay healthy during Ramadan?”

 A few weeks ago, searches—my own included—started pouring in. I looked up a recipe for Qatayef, the crescent-shaped dessert which has signaled the arrival of Ramadan in my house over the years. Now, I’m closer to recreating the Qatayef my mother used to make for my siblings and me years ago (and many others have also looked up the recipe to try to master the dish as well).

You can go beyond finding recipes with the resources in our Ramadan Hub. There, you’ll find most relevant information to help you observe the holy month. 

r1

The Ramadan Hub will walk you through different ways Google products can help you this month. 

Taking care of the little things

Now that we’ve entered Ramadan mode, the technology we use every day should adapt accordingly. To make it easier for you to find helpful content, the YouTube homepage in the Middle East, North Africa, Indonesia, and Turkey will display a collection of trending Ramadan videos. This ranges from videos that help you prepare an ambitious recipe, or that episode from the Ramadan series everyone is talking about.

Ramadan mode: on

Google Maps, Allo, Duo and Google Play will also keep up with you this Ramadan. A notification from Maps will tell you when to leave the office to beat the Ramadan traffic so you can get home in time for Iftar. Duo will remind you to call your friends and family before Eid, and we’re launching new Allo stickers that will help you convey those Ramadan feels. And the Play Store homepage will show you the most relevant and popular apps to help and guide you through Ramadan.

As you adapt to Ramadan, our products will adapt with you. With these new product updates,  we’ll take care of the small things so you can focus on the things that matter.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/gfYFHKIQ4wQ/

How Google products help you observe and adapt to Ramadan

Category: Google | May 29, 2017

Every year around Ramadan, people turn to Search with questions like “What is Ramadan?” or “Why do Muslims fast in the summer?” For those who celebrate Ramadan, the questions can be a bit more complex: “When is Iftar in Finland?” or “How do I stay healthy during Ramadan?”

 A few weeks ago, searches—my own included—started pouring in. I looked up a recipe for Qatayef, the crescent-shaped dessert which has signaled the arrival of Ramadan in my house over the years. Now, I’m closer to recreating the Qatayef my mother used to make for my siblings and me years ago (and many others have also looked up the recipe to try to master the dish as well).

You can go beyond finding recipes with the resources in our Ramadan Hub. There, you’ll find most relevant information to help you observe the holy month. 

r1

The Ramadan Hub will walk you through different ways Google products can help you this month. 

Taking care of the little things

Now that we’ve entered Ramadan mode, the technology we use every day should adapt accordingly. To make it easier for you to find helpful content, the YouTube homepage in the Middle East, North Africa, Indonesia, and Turkey will display a collection of trending Ramadan videos. This ranges from videos that help you prepare an ambitious recipe, or that episode from the Ramadan series everyone is talking about.

Ramadan mode: on

Google Maps, Allo, Duo and Google Play will also keep up with you this Ramadan. A notification from Maps will tell you when to leave the office to beat the Ramadan traffic so you can get home in time for Iftar. Duo will remind you to call your friends and family before Eid, and we’re launching new Allo stickers that will help you convey those Ramadan feels. And the Play Store homepage will show you the most relevant and popular apps to help and guide you through Ramadan.

As you adapt to Ramadan, our products will adapt with you. With these new product updates,  we’ll take care of the small things so you can focus on the things that matter.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/BmPqFScELM0/

How Google products help you observe and adapt to Ramadan

Category: Google | May 29, 2017

Every year around Ramadan, people turn to Search with questions like “What is Ramadan?” or “Why do Muslims fast in the summer?” For those who celebrate Ramadan, the questions can be a bit more complex: “When is Iftar in Finland?” or “How do I stay healthy during Ramadan?”

 A few weeks ago, searches—my own included—started pouring in. I looked up a recipe for Qatayef, the crescent-shaped dessert which has signaled the arrival of Ramadan in my house over the years. Now, I’m closer to recreating the Qatayef my mother used to make for my siblings and me years ago (and many others have also looked up the recipe to try to master the dish as well).

You can go beyond finding recipes with the resources in our Ramadan Hub. There, you’ll find most relevant information to help you observe the holy month. 

r1

The Ramadan Hub will walk you through different ways Google products can help you this month. 

Taking care of the little things

Now that we’ve entered Ramadan mode, the technology we use every day should adapt accordingly. To make it easier for you to find helpful content, the YouTube homepage in the Middle East, North Africa, Indonesia, and Turkey will display a collection of trending Ramadan videos. This ranges from videos that help you prepare an ambitious recipe, or that episode from the Ramadan series everyone is talking about.

Ramadan mode: on

Google Maps, Allo, Duo and Google Play will also keep up with you this Ramadan. A notification from Maps will tell you when to leave the office to beat the Ramadan traffic so you can get home in time for Iftar. Duo will remind you to call your friends and family before Eid, and we’re launching new Allo stickers that will help you convey those Ramadan feels. And the Play Store homepage will show you the most relevant and popular apps to help and guide you through Ramadan.

Allo-Ramadan-Stickers-Pixel.png

When words fail you, check out Allo’s Ramadan stickers.

As you adapt to Ramadan, our products will adapt with you. With these new product updates,  we’ll take care of the small things so you can focus on the things that matter.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/gfYFHKIQ4wQ/

AlphaGo’s next move

Category: Google | May 27, 2017

Cross-posted from the DeepMind blog

With just three stones on the board, it was clear that this was going to be no ordinary game of Go

Chinese Go Grandmaster and world number one Ke Jie departed from his typical style of play and opened with a “3:3 point” strategy—a highly unusual approach aimed at quickly claiming corner territory at the start of the game. The placement is rare amongst Go players, but it’s a favoured position of our program AlphaGo. Ke Jie was playing it at its own game. 

Ke Jie’s thoughtful positioning of that single black stone was a fitting motif for the opening match of The Future of Go Summit in Wuzhen, China, an event dedicated to exploring the truth of this beautiful and ancient game. Over the last five days we have been honoured to witness games of the highest calibre.

Ke Jie after game two

Ke Jie has a laugh after game two against AlphaGo on May 25, 2017 (Photo credit: Google)  

We have always believed in the potential for AI to help society discover new knowledge and benefit from it, and AlphaGo has given us an early glimpse that this may indeed be possible. More than a competitor, AlphaGo has been a tool to inspire Go players to try new strategies and uncover new ideas in this 3,000 year-old game. 

Team Go

The 9 dan player team of (left to right): Shi Yue, Mi Yuting, Tang Weixing, Chen Yaoye, and Zhou Ruiyang strategize their next move during the Team Go game against AlphaGo on May 26, 2017 (Photo credit: Google)

The creative moves it played against the legendary Lee Sedol in Seoul in 2016 brought completely new knowledge to the Go world, while the unofficial online games it played under the moniker Magister (Master) earlier this year have influenced many of Go’s leading professionals—including the genius Ke Jie himself. Events like this week’s Pair Go, in which two of the world’s top players partnered with AlphaGo, showed the great potential for people to use AI systems to generate new insights in complex fields.

This week’s series of thrilling games with the world’s best players, in the country where Go originated, has been the highest possible pinnacle for AlphaGo as a competitive program. For that reason, the Future of Go Summit is our final match event with AlphaGo.

The research team behind AlphaGo will now throw their energy into the next set of grand challenges, developing advanced general algorithms that could one day help scientists as they tackle some of our most complex problems, such as finding new cures for diseases, dramatically reducing energy consumption, or inventing revolutionary new materials. If AI systems prove they are able to unearth significant new knowledge and strategies in these domains too, the breakthroughs could be truly remarkable. We can’t wait to see what comes next.  

While AlphaGo is stepping back from competitive play, it’s certainly not the end of our work with the Go community, to which we owe a huge debt of gratitude for their encouragement and motivation over the past few years. We plan to publish one final academic paper later this year that will detail the extensive set of improvements we made to the algorithms’ efficiency and potential to be generalised across a broader set of problems. Just like our first AlphaGo paper, we hope that other developers will pick up the baton, and use these new advances to build their own set of strong Go programs.

We’re also working on a teaching tool—one of the top requests we’ve received throughout this week. The tool will show AlphaGo’s analysis of Go positions, providing an insight into how the program thinks, and hopefully giving all players and fans the opportunity to see the game through the lens of AlphaGo. We’re particularly honoured that our first collaborator in this effort will be the great Ke Jie, who has agreed to work with us on a study of his match with AlphaGo. We’re excited to hear his insights into these amazing games, and to have the chance to share some of AlphaGo’s own analysis too.

Finally, to mark the end of the Future of Go Summit, we wanted to give a special gift to fans of Go around the world. Since our match with Lee Sedol, AlphaGo has become its own teacher, playing millions of high level training games against itself to continually improve. We’re now publishing a special set of 50 AlphaGo vs AlphaGo games, played at full length time controls, which we believe contain many new and interesting ideas and strategies.

We took the opportunity this week in Wuzhen to show some of these games to a handful of top professionals. Shi Yue, 9 Dan Professional and World Champion said the games were “Like nothing I’ve ever seen before—they’re how I imagine games from far in the future.” Gu Li, 9 Dan Professional and World Champion, said that “AlphaGo’s self play games are incredible—we can learn many things from them.” We hope that all Go players will now enjoy trying out some of the moves in the set. The first ten games are now available here, and we’ll publish another ten each day until all 50 have been released.

We have been humbled by the Go community’s reaction to AlphaGo, and the way professional and amateur players have embraced its insights about this ancient game. We plan to bring that same excitement and insight to a range of new fields, and try to address some of the most important and urgent scientific challenges of our time. We hope that the story of AlphaGo is just the beginning.

AlphaGo awards

Demis and Ke Jie embrace after the award giving on the final day, May 27. 2017. (Photo credit: Google)

Ke Jie opening

Ke Jie makes his second move, part of his 3:3 opening in the final match of the series on May 27, 2017 (Photo credit: Google)

Pair Go

8 dan player Lian Xian and 9 dan player Gu Li pair up with AlphaGo teammates in the Pair Go match on May 26, 2017 (Photo credit: Google) 

Go players on stage

DeepMind’s Dave Silver and Fan Hui (far left) together on stage with (left to right) Gu Li, Lian Xian, Tang Weixing, Shi Yue, Zhou Ruiyang, Chen Yaoye, and Mi Yuting after the Team and Pair Go games on May 26, 2017 (Photo credit: Google)

Ke Jie and Lian Xian

China’s 8 dan and Pair Go player Lian Xian shares a laugh with Ke Jie as they watch the Team Go match on May 26, 2017 (Photo credit: Google)

Ke Jie speaking with press

Ke Jie on stage after game #1 on May 23, 2017 (Photo credit: Google) 

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/_gyNFFkw9Ns/