News > Google


Big dreams and bright ideas from Singaporean kids who code

Category: Google | Jun 5, 2017

13-year-old Celeste Low’s dream has always been to be a spy and be able to send encrypted messages to people. While she may have some way to go before she becomes an undercover agent, the coding skills Celeste has picked up through Code in the Community have enabled her to build a tool that allows people to send encrypted messages to one another.

Celeste belongs to the first cohort of 500 kids to take part in Code in the Community, a program to bring coding to 3,000 youths from less well-to-do backgrounds across Singapore. The Google office recently came alive with their energy and the ideas they showcased at a graduation ceremony to celebrate their achievements.

Celeste Low

Celeste Low showed her project to Senior Minister of State for Finance and Law Indranee Rajah. Her project is based on Caesar Shift, a type of substitution cipher where each letter in the original message is replaced with a letter corresponding to a certain number of letters up or down in the alphabet.

In just 10 short weeks, the program has opened up the eyes of kids as young as eight years old to the opportunities that technology creates and the innovations they might be able to build with it in the future. And the best thing is that they’re having fun while doing it! 

Ten-year-old Anesh Ashouk Giri and his 12-year-old sister Anesha Leoraa were strangers to coding before they began the program. But with encouragement from their parents who believe coding is an important skill, they were able to create simple programs in a matter of weeks. Using a Micro:bit—a pocket-sized codeable computer—they built a tool to control the movement of race cars on a track.

Anesh and Anesha

Siblings Anesh and Anesha show us their projects and that age is no barrier when it comes to coding! We’re here together with members of Singapore’s four self-help groups. 

Having fun is an important part of learning, and we’ve seen how it stirs curiosity to pick up more advanced skills. Outside the weekly coding class, 13-year-old Keeret Singh Sandhu turned to YouTube to go a step further, teaching himself how to build an app that can authenticate IC numbers. From here, Keeret hopes to create an AI-based product that’ll help kids with their math homework.

These are just some of the inspiring stories we’ve seen come out of Code in the Community, and we can’t wait to see what the kids build in future terms of the program. We’re grateful to our partners 21C Girls and Saturday Kids who deliver exciting classes every week, and to Singapore’s four self-help groups, CDAC, Eurasian Association, SINDA and Yayasan Mendaki, for making this program possible.

Watch what else the kids have to say about Code in the Community: 

Code in the Community - Big dreams and bright ideas from Singaporean kids who code

Code in the Community – Big dreams and bright ideas from Singaporean kids who code

And check out a few more photos taken on the day: 

CITC kids and parents

Here are some of the kids showing us their coding projects together with their family members and Senior Minister of State for Finance and Law Indranee Rajah. 

Life at Google

Googler Kim Rafeedie shares her experience working in technology with a group of Code in the Community kids

SMS with CITC kids

Senior Minister of State for Finance and Law Indranee Rajah drops by one of the breakout sessions to hear about some of the cool projects the kids are working on. 

Chua sisters

Sisters having fun while building. 

CITC wefie

A huge group we-fie!

.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/UAEbCpQ_tGg/

Let’s clear the air: mapping our environment for our health

Category: Google | Jun 5, 2017

How hot will it be today? What is the traffic for my commute to work? Where’s the nearest grocery store? Every day we use data about the world around us to make decisions. One useful dataset is air pollution data, which contains much-needed information that can help us understand how to live healthier lives, build smarter and more sustainable cities, and reduce climate-changing greenhouse gases in both urban and rural areas.

Mapping air pollution at street level

Today, with our partners at Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) and Aclima, we’re sharing the first results of an endeavor we started in 2015: to measure air quality using Aclima equipment mounted on Google Street View cars. You can now see maps for Oakland, CA, released by EDF, of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and black carbon—pollutants emitted from cars, trucks and other sources that can affect our health and our climate.

airview-blackcarbon1.png

Black carbon particles come from burning fuel, especially diesel, wood and coal. High exposure is associated with heart attacks, stroke and some forms of cancer. Air quality data from Google/Aclima; analysis by Apte et al/EDF. Colors on the map do not correlate to colors on the Air Quality Index.

Zooming in, you can see street-level details that show how pollution can change block by block. For example, the area where the Bay Bridge meets the I-80, a major freeway, has sustained higher pollution levels due to vehicles speeding up to cross under I-80 and merge onto the bridge. These insights can help community groups like the West Oakland Environmental Indicators Project get a better understanding of local air quality and assist regulators like the Bay Area Air Quality Management District in identifying opportunities to achieve greater air quality improvements. This kind of information can also be applied to other cities, who are trying to understand local air quality patterns and implement solutions that improve the local environment.

airview-blackcarbon2.png

Zoom-in of black carbon in Oakland, where you can see block-by-block air quality. Air quality data from Google/Aclima; analysis by Apte et al/EDF. Colors on the map do not correlate to colors on the Air Quality Index.

We hope Bay Area residents use this resource to explore air quality in Oakland, and find out how you can do your part to improve it. Scientists can request access to the validated data now. You can also learn more about the science behind these maps in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, authored by a scientific team led by Dr. Joshua Apte, at the University of Texas-Austin.

Today’s news follows our 2014 project with EDF to map methane leaks, and our 2015 announcement with Aclima to map air quality in Los Angeles, San Francisco and the Central Valley communities. We’re excited to share the data that made this science possible with more researchers.

With nearly 3 million measurements and 14,000 miles captured in the course of a year, this is one of the largest air quality datasets ever published, and demonstrates the potential of  neighborhood-level air quality mapping. This map makes the invisible, visible, so that we can breathe better and live healthier. It helps us understand how clean (or not clean) our air is, so that we can make changes to improve it.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/E_BxjxDd1xA/

Let’s clear the air: mapping our environment for our health

Category: Google | Jun 5, 2017

How hot will it be today? What is the traffic for my commute to work? Where’s the nearest grocery store? Every day we use data about the world around us to make decisions. One useful dataset is air pollution data, which contains much-needed information that can help us understand how to live healthier lives, build smarter and more sustainable cities, and reduce climate-changing greenhouse gases in both urban and rural areas.

Mapping air pollution at street level

Today, with our partners at Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) and Aclima, we’re sharing the first results of an endeavor we started in 2015: to measure air quality using Aclima equipment mounted on Google Street View cars. You can now see maps for Oakland, CA, released by EDF, of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and black carbon—pollutants emitted from cars, trucks and other sources that can affect our health and our climate.

airview-blackcarbon1.png

Black carbon particles come from burning fuel, especially diesel, wood and coal. High exposure is associated with heart attacks, stroke and some forms of cancer. Air quality data from Google/Aclima; analysis by Apte et al/EDF. Colors on the map do not correlate to colors on the Air Quality Index.

Zooming in, you can see street-level details that show how pollution can change block by block. For example, the area where the Bay Bridge meets the I-80, a major freeway, has sustained higher pollution levels due to vehicles speeding up to cross under I-80 and merge onto the bridge. These insights can help community groups like the West Oakland Environmental Indicators Project get a better understanding of local air quality and assist regulators like the Bay Area Air Quality Management District in identifying opportunities to achieve greater air quality improvements. This kind of information can also be applied to other cities, who are trying to understand local air quality patterns and implement solutions that improve the local environment.

airview-blackcarbon2.png

Zoom-in of black carbon in Oakland, where you can see block-by-block air quality. Air quality data from Google/Aclima; analysis by Apte et al/EDF. Colors on the map do not correlate to colors on the Air Quality Index.

We hope Bay Area residents use this resource to explore air quality in Oakland, and find out how you can do your part to improve it. Scientists can request access to the validated data now. You can also learn more about the science behind these maps in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, authored by a scientific team led by Dr. Joshua Apte, at the University of Texas-Austin.

Today’s news follows our 2014 project with EDF to map methane leaks, and our 2015 announcement with Aclima to map air quality in Los Angeles, San Francisco and the Central Valley communities. We’re excited to share the data that made this science possible with more researchers.

With nearly 3 million measurements and 14,000 miles captured in the course of a year, this is one of the largest air quality datasets ever published, and demonstrates the potential of  neighborhood-level air quality mapping. This map makes the invisible, visible, so that we can breathe better and live healthier. It helps us understand how clean (or not clean) our air is, so that we can make changes to improve it.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/inKf6wZtx3c/

Connecting the best CEE startups with European VC funds at Campus Warsaw

Category: Google | Jun 5, 2017

Central and Eastern Europe is rich with technical talent and a growing number of globally-minded startups, yet it is a fragmented region of over 150 million people, living in more than a dozen countries. When startups start to gain traction and think about scaling internationally, they face a problem on how to raise VC funds.  At the same time, global venture capital funds are searching for young companies to invest in, but often are unable to travel extensively across the CEE region.  

 Last  week Campus Warsaw, a Google space for entrepreneurs, hosted the first-ever CEE All Stars event to connect 40 of the region’s most promising startups together with 25 venture capital firms, making it the biggest fundraising event of its kind in all of Central and Eastern Europe.

Campus Warsaw’s mission is to connect the region’s entrepreneurs to global startup ecosystem and  directly support entrepreneurs with programs at every stage of the lifecycle.

When we launched 18 months ago, coworking hubs from Poland, Estonia, Czechia, Hungary, Lithuania and more CEE countries met to discuss how a network could support startups from the entire region. In the months that followed, we brought together startup hubs, accelerators, and early-stage venture capital firms to create a much-needed community–and conceived CEE All Stars as our flagship Community event.

CEE All Stars 3

Entrepreneurs and investors at CEE All Stars at Campus Warsaw

Each startup at CEE All Stars had the opportunity to briefly present its idea and business model to potential investors during pitching sessions, followed by individual 1:1 meetings: “During the 2 day intensive event, I was able to have 16 meetings with VCs, something I usually make in a year on my own” said one of the founders present at the event.

CEE All Stars 2

Entrepreneurs and investors at CEE All Stars at Campus Warsaw

While the startups at CEE All Stars come from the same region, they are quite a diversified group across different industries and different stages of business.

  • We hosted startups launched five years ago (such as Latvian Sellfy) and five months ago (Estonian Shipitwise);

  • Those who have already experienced a great success on the market (e.g. PublishDrive, an e-book publisher that has just been chosen for LaunchPad Accelerator program, or Funderful, which provides services to universities including Oxford, Cambridge and Berkeley) and those who have just reached profitability.

  • They represent a wide range of industries from fintech (Czech BudgetBakers or Lithuanian Welltrado) or health (Estonian SoterAnalytics) to travel (Polish BeforeYouGo or Czech ClaimAir) and culture (Lithuanian Bescouted or Polish Flowbox).

  • Some pitched cutting-edge technology, e.g. Wolf3D, which creates truly realistic avatars to represent people in VR, or iGreet, using Augmented Reality to produce cards that provoke increased emotional experience.

What they all have in common is courage, a passion for innovation and hunger for international success.

We were blown away by the talent, and hope that in a few years’ time, when startups present at Campus Warsaw this week look back, they will consider CEE All Stars as a milestone in the development of their business. We also look forward to replicating this type of fundraising event together with other regional coworking hubs. CEE All Stars hosted by Campus Warsaw may be the first of its kind–but we have a feeling it won’t be the last.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/1qjXF8HGqXA/

Connecting the best CEE startups with European VC funds at Campus Warsaw

Category: Google | Jun 5, 2017

Central and Eastern Europe is rich with technical talent and a growing number of globally-minded startups, yet it is a fragmented region of over 150 million people, living in more than a dozen countries. When startups start to gain traction and think about scaling internationally, they face a problem on how to raise VC funds.  At the same time, global venture capital funds are searching for young companies to invest in, but often are unable to travel extensively across the CEE region.  

 Last  week Campus Warsaw, a Google space for entrepreneurs, hosted the first-ever CEE All Stars event to connect 40 of the region’s most promising startups together with 25 venture capital firms, making it the biggest fundraising event of its kind in all of Central and Eastern Europe.

Campus Warsaw’s mission is to connect the region’s entrepreneurs to global startup ecosystem and  directly support entrepreneurs with programs at every stage of the lifecycle.

When we launched 18 months ago, coworking hubs from Poland, Estonia, Czechia, Hungary, Lithuania and more CEE countries met to discuss how a network could support startups from the entire region. In the months that followed, we brought together startup hubs, accelerators, and early-stage venture capital firms to create a much-needed community–and conceived CEE All Stars as our flagship Community event.

CEE All Stars 3

Entrepreneurs and investors at CEE All Stars at Campus Warsaw

Each startup at CEE All Stars had the opportunity to briefly present its idea and business model to potential investors during pitching sessions, followed by individual 1:1 meetings: “During the 2 day intensive event, I was able to have 16 meetings with VCs, something I usually make in a year on my own” said one of the founders present at the event.

CEE All Stars 2

Entrepreneurs and investors at CEE All Stars at Campus Warsaw

While the startups at CEE All Stars come from the same region, they are quite a diversified group across different industries and different stages of business.

  • We hosted startups launched five years ago (such as Latvian Sellfy) and five months ago (Estonian Shipitwise);

  • Those who have already experienced a great success on the market (e.g. PublishDrive, an e-book publisher that has just been chosen for LaunchPad Accelerator program, or Funderful, which provides services to universities including Oxford, Cambridge and Berkeley) and those who have just reached profitability.

  • They represent a wide range of industries from fintech (Czech BudgetBakers or Lithuanian Welltrado) or health (Estonian SoterAnalytics) to travel (Polish BeforeYouGo or Czech ClaimAir) and culture (Lithuanian Bescouted or Polish Flowbox).

  • Some pitched cutting-edge technology, e.g. Wolf3D, which creates truly realistic avatars to represent people in VR, or iGreet, using Augmented Reality to produce cards that provoke increased emotional experience.

What they all have in common is courage, a passion for innovation and hunger for international success.

We were blown away by the talent, and hope that in a few years’ time, when startups present at Campus Warsaw this week look back, they will consider CEE All Stars as a milestone in the development of their business. We also look forward to replicating this type of fundraising event together with other regional coworking hubs. CEE All Stars hosted by Campus Warsaw may be the first of its kind–but we have a feeling it won’t be the last.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/25Ztdx17ptQ/

Exploring with Udacity: how four lucky Android scholars experienced Google I/O

Category: Google | Jun 5, 2017

Last November, with Udacity and Bertelsmann, we announced a new scholarship program for 10,000 EU Android developers to learn new skills. But due to an overwhelming response, we ended up awarding a whopping 13,500 scholarships.Through a Google-certified Udacity course, we embarked on a journey to help these young developers pursue their dreams and make most of what internet has to offer them.

Some of these developers come from families or communities that told them that “tech is not for girls.” Some had the courage to quit their jobs at 30 for an internship that brought them closer to their goal of becoming Android developers. Others couldn’t imagine themselves embracing a new career path right away but knew developer skills could be important regardless. What united them all was the desire to learn, and to open new doors to opportunities for the future.

Udacity Medium Screenshot

A fragment from Android scholar George’s story on Medium. George was awarded the Android Beginners scholarship.  

Four lucky young people that benefited from the scholarship program and have shown an amazing level of commitment were selected to attend Google I/O 2017—Amanda from London, U.K., Jacub from Wroclaw, Poland, Stefanie  from Vienna, Austria, and Bart from Warsaw, Poland. And through #MyIOwithUdacity we got to tag along.

We started by getting to know them better—observing their excitement as they packed for California, the surprise on their faces at so many great developers under one tent, and to watch how inspired they were by the I/O presenters and their fellow attendees.

Each day we went along for the ride, watching their photos & videos from the heart of the I/O action.

Udacity tweet 1

Udacity tweet 2

Udacity tweet 3

Udacity tweet 4

Udacity tweet 5

Udacity tweet 6


The Google I/O Adventure was just one of many opportunities for the thousands of European scholarship recipients we’re so proud of across the region. We’re committed to championing these scholars long-term and to opening new doors for the European developer community.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/C3d0n5kE5p0/

Exploring with Udacity: how four lucky Android scholars experienced Google I/O

Category: Google | Jun 5, 2017

Last November, with Udacity and Bertelsmann, we announced a new scholarship program for 10,000 EU Android developers to learn new skills. But due to an overwhelming response, we ended up awarding a whopping 13,500 scholarships.Through a Google-certified Udacity course, we embarked on a journey to help these young developers pursue their dreams and make most of what internet has to offer them.

Some of these developers come from families or communities that told them that “tech is not for girls.” Some had the courage to quit their jobs at 30 for an internship that brought them closer to their goal of becoming Android developers. Others couldn’t imagine themselves embracing a new career path right away but knew developer skills could be important regardless. What united them all was the desire to learn, and to open new doors to opportunities for the future.

Udacity Medium Screenshot

A fragment from Android scholar George’s story on Medium. George was awarded the Android Beginners scholarship.  

Four lucky young people that benefited from the scholarship program and have shown an amazing level of commitment were selected to attend Google I/O 2017—Amanda from London, U.K., Jacub from Wroclaw, Poland, Stefanie  from Vienna, Austria, and Bart from Warsaw, Poland. And through #MyIOwithUdacity we got to tag along.

We started by getting to know them better—observing their excitement as they packed for California, the surprise on their faces at so many great developers under one tent, and to watch how inspired they were by the I/O presenters and their fellow attendees.

Each day we went along for the ride, watching their photos & videos from the heart of the I/O action.

Udacity tweet 1

Udacity tweet 2

Udacity tweet 3

Udacity tweet 4

Udacity tweet 5

Udacity tweet 6


The Google I/O Adventure was just one of many opportunities for the thousands of European scholarship recipients we’re so proud of across the region. We’re committed to championing these scholars long-term and to opening new doors for the European developer community.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/z1DL4zAp1RM/

Exploring with Udacity: how four lucky Android scholars experienced Google I/O

Category: Google | Jun 5, 2017

Last November, with Udacity and Bertelsmann, we announced a new scholarship program for 10,000 EU Android developers to learn new skills. But due to an overwhelming response, we ended up awarding a whopping 13,500 scholarships.Through a Google-certified Udacity course, we embarked on a journey to help these young developers pursue their dreams and make most of what internet has to offer them.

Some of these developers come from families or communities that told them that “tech is not for girls.” Some had the courage to quit their jobs at 30 for an internship that brought them closer to their goal of becoming Android developers. Others couldn’t imagine themselves embracing a new career path right away but knew developer skills could be important regardless. What united them all was the desire to learn, and to open new doors to opportunities for the future.

Udacity Medium Screenshot

A fragment from Android scholar George’s story on Medium. George was awarded the Android Beginners scholarship.  

Four lucky young people that benefited from the scholarship program and have shown an amazing level of commitment were selected to attend Google I/O 2017—Amanda from London, U.K., Jacub from Wroclaw, Poland, Stefanie  from Vienna, Austria, and Bart from Warsaw, Poland. And through #MyIOwithUdacity we got to tag along.

We started by getting to know them better—observing their excitement as they packed for California, the surprise on their faces at so many great developers under one tent, and to watch how inspired they were by the I/O presenters and their fellow attendees.

Each day we went along for the ride, watching their photos & videos from the heart of the I/O action.

Udacity tweet 1

Udacity tweet 2

Udacity tweet 3

Udacity tweet 4

Udacity tweet 5

Udacity tweet 6


The Google I/O Adventure was just one of many opportunities for the thousands of European scholarship recipients we’re so proud of across the region. We’re committed to championing these scholars long-term and to opening new doors for the European developer community.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/IawQrmvEpa8/

Your summer-lovin’ Google Assistant

Category: Google | Jun 2, 2017

T-minus two weeks until summer officially begins, and sunny days, BBQs, outdoor concerts are around the corner. Here’s how your Google Assistant can shine like the summer sun:

  • Planning to go to a big summer concert? Just ask your Assistant on your phone “When is the Stern Grove Festival?” 
  • Hosting a BBQ? Order the essentials with your Assistant on Google Home by saying “order charcoal.” 
  • Want a refreshment while you’re lounging around? Ask your Assistant on your phone to “Talk to Tender” (a cocktail recommendation service) and get drink ideas that are right up your alley. 
  • Ready for your summer vacation? Just ask your Assistant on your phone for “Flights to Miami.” You can even flight track with your Google Home by saying “Is my flight on time?” 
  • Welcome the summer vibes with the right lighting. With TP-Link lights or Phillips Hue, just say “Change the living lights to blue” with your Assistant on Google Home.

Google Assistant

Whether your idea of an adventure is hitting the beach or setting up the kiddie pool in the yard, your Assistant is ready to dive into summer with you.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/0jsxH7zEWwI/

Your summer-lovin’ Google Assistant

Category: Google | Jun 2, 2017

T-minus two weeks until summer officially begins, and sunny days, BBQs, outdoor concerts are around the corner. Here’s how your Google Assistant can shine like the summer sun:

  • Planning to go to a big summer concert? Just ask your Assistant on your phone “When is the Stern Grove Festival?” 
  • Hosting a BBQ? Order the essentials with your Assistant on Google Home by saying “order charcoal.” 
  • Want a refreshment while you’re lounging around? Ask your Assistant on your phone to “Talk to Tender” (a cocktail recommendation service) and get drink ideas that are right up your alley. 
  • Ready for your summer vacation? Just ask your Assistant on your phone for “Flights to Miami.” You can even flight track with your Google Home by saying “Is my flight on time?” 
  • Welcome the summer vibes with the right lighting. With TP-Link lights or Phillips Hue, just say “Change the living lights to blue” with your Assistant on Google Home.

Google Assistant

Whether your idea of an adventure is hitting the beach or setting up the kiddie pool in the yard, your Assistant is ready to dive into summer with you.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/FBKRFIA6L_A/