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Celebrating iconic British fashion on Google Arts & Culture

Category: Google | Dec 5, 2016

Creativity? Craftsmanship? Iconic Design? Count us in.

With our shared passion for great design, Google and the British Fashion Council are teaming up to bring to life the creativity, heritage and craftsmanship of British fashion–for anyone around the world to enjoy, for free. The project, found at g.co/britishfashion, will support the Council’s Education Foundation and aims to educate and inspire future generations of young fashion creatives, designers and students.

To celebrate its rich history and create new experiences around British fashion, the British Fashion Council has invited fashion icons – designers, makers and craftspeople, creatives, photographers, stylists and models – to come together and use advanced technologies to share their stories.

Visitors will be able to trace the history of British Fashion over the decades, and see giants of the industry – from Alexander McQueen to Vivienne Westwood – in specially curated digital experiences showcasing their stories, work and inspirations. There are over 1,500 gems to explore in over twenty-five multimedia stories and exhibits, more than one hundred and forty videos and three virtual reality experiences, all accessible from anywhere in the world, on desktop, laptop or mobile on iOS and Android.

British Fashion CI

As part of the collaboration, Sarah Mower MBE, the American Vogue Chief Critic and BFC Ambassador, has directed an immersive short film – Fashioning the Future – bringing viewers face-to-face with industry luminaries in virtual reality. Using Google Cardboard or on YouTube via a 360 video, users can be part of a conversation with supermodel Naomi Campbell, designer Anya Hindmarch, creative director Edward Enninful and Joan Burstein, founder of Browns Fashion.

More highlights of the digital collection include:

Sorting their searches by colour and chronology, visitors can also explore rich archival materials from top British fashion institutions such as i-D Magazine, trailblazing 1960s designer Mary Quant, and the milliner Stephen Jones. They will be able to get close to British Fashion’s biggest characters and moments, reliving Kate Moss’s first runway show at London Fashion Week and exploring profiles of the fashion industry’s key players – from David Bailey to Naomi Campbell.

Users will also be able to go behind-the-scenes of top craftspeople and producers of British fashion, learning about the methods and histories of enduring symbols of British heritage. And, in anticipation of London Fashion Week Men’s in January, the site will feature a ‘Spotlight on Menswear’ featuring content from fashion insiders such as Dylan Jones, Jim Chapman and Nick Knight.

To mark the launch of the project, Britain’s Paul Smith has designed a special-edition Google Cardboard and created an online experience around five objects that represent his creative vision and brand.

Cardboard CI

The online exhibition opens today at g.co/britishfashion and is available for free online and through the new Google Arts & Culture mobile app on iOS and Android. You can watch all the 360 degree videos on YouTube.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/VxXzEF34uE4/

Tap. Pay. Celebrate.

Category: Google | Dec 5, 2016

Android Pay, Google’s app that allows you to make contactless payments, is becoming one of the UK’s favorite ways to shop since its launch this past May. Adoption of Android Pay is growing rapidly as people are tapping on the Tube, in stores, and in their favorite apps.

Let the Gifting Begin

As we head into the festive season, the Android Pay team is thrilled to announce the launch of shop. tap. reward. Each time you use Android Pay in store in the UK or on the Transport for London network from now until the end of the year*, you’ll receive a virtual cracker in the app. Open the cracker to see if you’ve won one of over 100,000 gift cards that could be inside, including a £10 Costa Coffee gift card, a pair of tickets for ODEON Cinemas, a £500 House of Fraser gift card or a £500 Currys PC World gift card.  

Android Pay

With each of your first five taps you can also collect a virtual coin, and after you collect five coins, you’ll earn a free £3 Costa Coffee gift card. Learn more about these festive surprises and share your excitement with #shoptapreward and #AndroidPay.

Fa la la all the Way Home

In the UK, more and more people are using Android Pay to tap and pay for their journey on the Transport for London network. To make their experience even better, this week Google and TfL introduced some new features for their riders:

  • Incomplete journey notifications: If you forget to tap in or out at any TfL station, Android Pay will notify you the following day that you have an incomplete journey, so you can request a refund on the TfL website.
  • Daily travel summary: Station names and bus numbers will now be tracked within the Android Pay app, so at the end of the day you will be able to see a summary of your daily journey added to your TfL transaction.

And it gets even better. Starting today, UK users will see the Android Pay button in the Uber app. Not only is it a great transit option for getting those oversized shopping bags home, but starting later this week, you can get up to 50% off your next 10 rides (up to £5 per ride) when you use Android Pay**.

Festive Fun Everywhere

We’re delighted to share that Android Pay is currently available in in seven countries: United States, United Kingdom, Australia, Singapore, Hong Kong, Poland and New Zealand, with more countries coming soon.

In the upcoming weeks, users everywhere will be able to enjoy fun celebratory animations as they tap and pay with Android Pay. Here is a sneak peek of a few designs:

Android Pay

Let us know your favorite by sharing your posts on social with #AndroidPay.

We welcome you to tap on and enjoy the festive fun.

*While supplies last.

**Promoter is: Uber BV, Vijzelstraat 68-78, 4th floor, 1017 HL Amsterdam. Google and its affiliates are not the promoter(s) of this offer, and have no liability in connection with it. Offer available until 31/12/2016. Please refer to the full terms & conditions here.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/7VCW7LpchHs/

The power of Hour of Code with Google CS First

Category: Google | Dec 2, 2016

Editor’s Note: Next week kicks off #CSEdWeek, the 8th annual celebration of Computer Science Education. Today we’re looking back at an inspiring story from last year’s CSEdWeek — a Los Angeles school that kickstarted a movement to bring computer science education to students after participating in a CSFirst activity. Stay tuned to hear more #CSEdWeek announcements next week. And if you have a great story to share with us about CS First in your district or school, we’d love to hear! Please share with us on Twitter or in our CS First Google+ Community.

Lynwood Unified School District is south of Los Angeles, nestled among Watts, Compton and Downey. William Gideon, LUSD’s director of research and evaluation and a former engineer, has been working towards bringing more educational resources to the district. He recognized the need for more computer science (CS) resources in the school system, yet wanted to be strategic about the programs he brought to Lynwood.

Last year, while Mr. Gideon attended the California STEM Symposium, he discovered Google CS First, a program that provides free CS curriculum for classroom and after-school programs. Looking back on that time, he said:  “I was immediately skeptical because there have been many times before when I’ve heard corporate America claim to support education, but they really didn’t. It was all talk, no action or true support.”

Despite his misgivings, Mr. Gideon spoke with the Google team and found out more information about the resources for students as well as teachers. They also told him more about Hour of Code, a one-hour coding tutorial designed for all ages. In the end, he was persuaded to try Hour of Code with LUSD’s elementary and middle schools.

LUSD had never participated in Hour of Code or CSEdweek before, so LUSD’s Technology Services jumped into action to ensure teachers had what they needed to do the activity in their classrooms. The district also tried to get local university students to help out, but when that proved impossible due to college exam schedules, they forged ahead. Says Mr. Gideon: “We were on our own. However, we didn’t let that stop us.”

Despite these challenges, the effort was a success. In fact, teachers, students and staff were so inspired and excited that the district leadership decided to implement the full CS First program for all schools in Lynwood. Within a few weeks, 18 teachers were up and running after learning the tool, resulting in 200 students participating in CS First in the spring of 2016.

Lynwood Unified School District’s success with Google CS First and Hour of Code helped kickstart more efforts to get students and teachers engaged with computer science, like digital learning coaches and summer clubs. This fall, they’ve added additional CS-focused resources for K-8 students, with programs like Tynker, Code.org, Osmo, Dash and Dot, and of course, CS First.

With technology support for students, no one stays behind.

Shirley Giacoman

LUSD Teacher

One year later, LUSD elementary/middle school students and teachers are excited and optimistic about STEM and CS. More than 1,200 LUSD students have coded for a total of 9,735 hours in 76 CS First Clubs. Students have access to 8,000 computers to share via Chromebook carts — up from zero just a year ago. And LUSD staff is getting ready for this year’s CSEdweek and the newest Hour of Code activity, Gumball’s Coding Adventure.

Lynwood has made huge strides in its CS education offerings… and it all started with just one Hour of Code. This CSEdWeek, we hope you’ll see for yourself what an Hour of Code can do. Learn more about Google’s CSEdWeek offerings on our website.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/XcoYK5uokew/

Have a holly jolly time in Santa’s Village — now open

Category: Google | Dec 2, 2016

Santa’s elves are back at the North Pole working to make sure old Kris Kringle is ready for his journey around the world on December 24 — and that means Santa’s Village is now officially open. Each day until the sleigh takes off, we’ll unlock a new experience that’ll get even the biggest grinch into the holiday spirit.   

                                        

From sliding penguins to dancing elves, the residents of the North Pole are having the time of their lives, and now you can join in the merriment. This year you’ll find several new games in Santa’s Village, including four new ones only available on the Android app — including Present Quest, where you try your hand at recovering Santa’s misplaced gifts out in the real world.

                                     

Just in time for CSEdWeek this December 5 through 11, we’ll unwrap three coding games to help kids of all ages learn the basics of coding. In Code Boogie, for example, you can help Santa’s elves learn dance moves by combining patterns and creating sequences.

                                      

Within the gates of Santa’s Village, the new educator resource page is filled with lesson plans and educational games spanning subjects from computer science to geography. Teachers and parents can sort by category to easily find and download lesson plans for use in the classroom or at home.

                                    

Be on the lookout for more holiday cheer throughout the month, and don’t forget to return on December 23-24 (depending on your time zone) to track Santa’s journey around the world as he brings gifts and joy to people worldwide. Until then, make merry with the residents of the North Pole on web (desktop and mobile Android/iOS), Android app, Google Maps (desktop and mobile), Android TV and Chrome.  

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/VZFqZplI0EU/

It takes a teacher to inspire and be inspired

Category: Google | Dec 2, 2016

Editor’s note: At Education on Air, Google’s free online conference tomorrow, December 3, we’ll be celebrating educators and exploring the future of education and technology.  During the event, Jennie Magiera will be moderating a live panel featuring educators who have pioneered technology at their schools, along with two students who have benefited from these teachers’ work. Register now to hear from the panelists live tomorrow, December 3.

Magiera Headshot.JPG

Jennie Magiera

“Too often, teachers are the last people to sing their own praises, even though they’re constantly inspiring their students, their colleagues and their students’ parents, ” says Jennie Magiera, chief technology officer at Des Plaines School District 62. “We’ve all had at least one teacher who inspired us to become who we are today.”

Tomorrow, December 3, Jennie will be moderating a live panel during Education on Air featuring educators who have pioneered technology at their schools, along with two students who have benefited from these teachers’ work. The panel will include:

  • Kevin Brookhouser, teacher at York School
  • Maria, Kevin’s student
  • Rafranz Davis, executive director of professional and digital learning at Lufkin ISD
  • Andrew, Rafranz’s student

Jennie shared a few questions with our panelists to learn more about the teachers who helped shape them into who they are today. To hear from the panelists live, join us for Education on Air tomorrow, December 3.

Jennie: Our theme for this panel is “It takes a teacher.” When you were a student, who inspired you and how?

kevin.jpg

Kevin Brookhouser

Kevin: I took a video writing class in high school with Jim Talone, who is now retired.  For our final project he asked us to go into the community and find stories that we would then produce and distribute to a real-world audience. This was the first time a teacher gave me creative autonomy, allowing me to pursue what I thought was meaningful and share that project with a real audience. It motivated me to invest more time and work harder than I had ever worked. That experience has stuck with me.

Rafranz: I was inspired by Dr. Vanessa Huse, a professor of  math education for pre-service teaching (education provided to student teachers). She was an important mentor to me and is still part of my life now. She was one of the only people who understood the struggles that I’d face as a teacher of color, even though she doesn’t come from the same background that I do. She made sure I had mentors who were veteran teachers — people I could learn from and collaborate with. She even introduced me to Dr. Evelyn Boyd Granville, the second African American woman to hold a degree in math. She invited Dr. Granville  to speak to our class and share her story. In many ways, Dr. Huse knew what I needed before I did.

Jennie: We couldn’t invite every teacher that inspires us to be on this panel, though I’m sure you would agree that we wish we could. If you could have brought along one colleague, who would you have picked?

Kevin: There are so many teachers I’d pick. The first colleague who comes to mind is our high school art teacher, Logan Parsons.  She has all of her students create self-portraits. She guides the students to think about how they want to portray themselves, whether in an abstract way or something more realistic. The results are unique and reflective of each individual. I’m inspired by how much students seem to get out of this project and from working with Logan.  

Rafranz.jpg

Rafranz Davis 

Rafranz: It’s so hard to pick one teacher! One of our first and second-grade teachers, Jamie Mayhan, stands out to me because she has such a passion for her students and really thinks outside of the box. She overcomes every challenge in her way. For example, she personally took on the cause of creating better access to technology for her students. She started a BYOD [bring your own device] program in her classroom, which required working with parents to get students devices. To make sure every student had access, she even gathered extra devices on her own by helping students to borrow devices from parents and coordinating device loans from digital learning department.

Jennie: We’ll be talking a lot about what it takes a teacher to do, but what does it take a student to do? How have your students inspired you?

Kevin: My students inspire me with their ability to take risks and try new things before they know whether they’ll succeed. Their willingness to experiment, learn new skills, and participate in new activities motivates me to do the same. That bravery is how real learning happens. I’m also inspired by my students who have a deep desire to help others. They request to work on projects that will  positively impact on other people. Their optimism and generosity gives me a lot of hope for the future.

Rafranz: We put a lot of emphasis on teaching kids grit and resilience to help them overcome adversity, but if we listen, we might be surprised to find out how much strength they already have. I’m inspired by our students who have come from difficult backgrounds — whether they were raised in poverty or affluence — and have been able to rise above challenges and pursue their dreams. Even though they may grow up with circumstances they can’t control, they show up to school and work hard, learn new things and think creatively.

To hear more from Jennie, Kevin and Rafranz live, join us for Education on Air tomorrow, December 3.

We invite you to join this movement by sharing what teachers mean to you with #ItTakesATeacher and seeing your own and others’ stories re-shared at google.com/edu/teacher.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/r-g1lBt7d0c/

Announcing Google Play’s “Best of 2016”

Category: Google | Dec 1, 2016

As the year draws to a close, we’re thrilled to announce Google Play’s most popular apps, games, music, movies, TV shows and books globally in 2016.

The Force and Harry Potter were no match for a different kind of superhero as Deadpool and “Deadpool Kills the Universe” dominated the movie and book charts this year. Game of Thrones kept The Walking Dead away to once again claim the Iron Throne as the most popular TV show of 2016. Twenty One Pilots had no need to feel “Stressed Out” as their single came in as the number one most streamed song of the year, but don’t feel “Sorry” for Justin Bieber who came in at number two. And, of course, Pokemon GO captured the top trending game spot.

Check out Google Play’s top five lists for the most popular content around the world in 2016 below. For complete local lists, visit Google Play.

Google Play’s Global Best of 2016 Lists

TOP TRENDING APPS of 2016

  1. Face Changer 2
  2. Lumyer – Photo & Selfie Editor
  3. Castbox – Podcast Radio Music
  4. Emoji Keyboard Pro
  5. MSQRD

TOP TRENDING GAMES of 2016

  1. Pokémon GO
  2. Clash Royale
  3. Traffic Rider
  4. slither.io
  5. Dream League Soccer

TOP 5 STREAMED SONGS of 2016

  1. Stressed Out, Twenty One Pilots
  2. Sorry, Justin Bieber
  3. One Dance (feat. WizKid & Kyla), Drake
  4. Don’t Let Me Down (feat. Daya), The Chainsmokers
  5. Me, Myself & I, G-Eazy

TOP 5 MOVIES of 2016

  1. Deadpool
  2. Star Wars: The Force Awakens
  3. Zootopia
  4. Captain America: Civil War
  5. Batman v Superman: Dawn Of Justice

TOP 5 TV SHOWS of 2016           

  1. Game of Thrones
  2. The Walking Dead
  3. The Big Bang Theory
  4. Mr. Robot
  5. The Flash

TOP 5 BOOKS of 2016

  1. Deadpool Kills the Marvel Universe by Cullen Bunn
  2. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child: Parts One and Two by J.K. Rowling, John Tiffany, Jack Thorne
  3. The Girl on the Train: A Novel by Paula Hawkins
  4. The Art of War by Tzu Sun
  5. Me Before You: A Novel by Jojo Moyes

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/2V2pWBtWnYI/

Announcing Google Play’s “Best of 2016”

Category: Google | Dec 1, 2016

As the year draws to a close, we’re thrilled to announce Google Play’s most popular apps, games, music, movies, TV shows and books globally in 2016.

The Force and Harry Potter were no match for a different kind of superhero as Deadpool and “Deadpool Kills the Universe” dominated the movie and book charts this year. Game of Thrones kept The Walking Dead away to once again claim the Iron Throne as the most popular TV show of 2016. Twenty One Pilots had no need to feel “Stressed Out” as their single came in as the number one most streamed song of the year, but don’t feel “Sorry” for Justin Bieber who came in at number two. And, of course, Pokemon GO captured the top trending game spot.

Check out Google Play’s top five lists for the most popular content around the world in 2016 below. For complete local lists, visit Google Play.

Google Play’s Global Best of 2016 Lists

TOP TRENDING APPS of 2016

  1. Face Changer 2
  2. Lumyer – Photo & Selfie Editor
  3. Castbox – Podcast Radio Music
  4. Emoji Keyboard Pro
  5. MSQRD

TOP TRENDING GAMES of 2016

  1. Pokémon GO
  2. Clash Royale
  3. Traffic Rider
  4. slither.io
  5. Dream League Soccer

TOP 5 STREAMED SONGS of 2016

  1. Stressed Out, Twenty One Pilots
  2. Sorry, Justin Bieber
  3. One Dance (feat. WizKid & Kyla), Drake
  4. Don’t Let Me Down (feat. Daya), The Chainsmokers
  5. Me, Myself & I, G-Eazy

TOP 5 MOVIES of 2016

  1. Deadpool
  2. Star Wars: The Force Awakens
  3. Zootopia
  4. Captain America: Civil War
  5. Batman v Superman: Dawn Of Justice

TOP 5 TV SHOWS of 2016           

  1. Game of Thrones
  2. The Walking Dead
  3. The Big Bang Theory
  4. Mr. Robot
  5. The Flash

TOP 5 BOOKS of 2016

  1. Deadpool Kills the Marvel Universe by Cullen Bunn
  2. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child: Parts One and Two by J.K. Rowling, John Tiffany, Jack Thorne
  3. The Girl on the Train: A Novel by Paula Hawkins
  4. The Art of War by Tzu Sun
  5. Me Before You: A Novel by Jojo Moyes

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/nQvDtGwNI6Y/

Impact Portraits: success stories with Google for Education

Category: Google | Dec 1, 2016

Editor’s Note: We’re often asked by educators, “what impact do you see with Google technology in schools?” Last year we engaged Evergreen Education Group on a journey around the world to answer that question. During Education on Air on Saturday December 3rd, we will share the findings in Impact Portraits. These portraits demonstrate success with Google for Education through the lens of teachers, students and administrators. To hear Linda Darling-Hammond lead a discussion on Impact Portraits, register now for Education On Air.

At Evergreen Education Group we’ve studied K-12 digital education for fourteen years. Among the most important developments we have seen is the proliferation of devices in the classroom, whether through bring-your-own-device, district-led one-to-one programs or other channels. Relatively little study to date has examined how devices are successfully deployed and what their impact has been.

We were therefore thrilled that Google was interested in learning the answers to these questions, and in particular that they understood the study required speaking directly with the district and school leaders, curriculum and instruction specialists, and teachers at the forefront of the use of technology. Particularly they wanted to understand the impact of Chromebooks and G Suite for Education across schools.

Over the course of 16 months we spoke with more than 100 district and school leaders in six countries representing more than 880,000 students, analyzed each school’s documents and data, conducted surveys of administrators, teachers and students, and reviewed surveys the schools conducted. Our goal at every step was to let educators tell their stories, be honest about the challenges and failures, and celebrate the successes in the vein of highlighting these wonderful schools and providing guidance as schools continue down the digital path.

Early in the project we were asked to complete the sentence “Technology in the classroom equals…what?” Our answer: when considered alone, technology equals nothing. Technology is a tool that can be used well, or it can be used poorly. But when technology was combined with four key factors, it could help the school flourish. What are these key factors? Planning, Professional learning, Patience, and Support.

Why are these factors necessary? Because supporting the teachers who are using technology and transforming classrooms takes time—time measured in years, not weeks or months.

What does success look like? It takes different forms. But one common factor is that when educators speak of their success, they rarely lead with technology. Instead they talk about personalization, student engagement, and the role of teachers—all of these supported by technology.

This is about weaving technology into everything we do. Education technology is a tool, not a strategy.

Dr. Mike Pressler

Maine East High School

The findings reveal examples of accomplishment and achievement from schools in different geographic regions, of varied sizes, enrolling a diversity of students. We—and the educators that we interviewed—would never suggest that the use of technology is a silver bullet that will in itself improve student achievement. However, based on our review of these schools, we are confident in saying that technology, when well planned and implemented, can be a key component of a successful digital strategy that has a positive impact on student outcomes.

  • Charlotte-Mecklenburg (US), the world’s largest Chromebook deployment, outperformed the state and other large North Carolina school districts in exceeding student growth expectations in 2015-2016 and saw a 20% increase in graduation rate.

[edu] Charlotte-Mecklenburg Chart.png

  • At McKinnon Secondary College (AU), students are actively driving learning and creating more than 1000 Google Docs each day. McKinnon was ranked 14th among all schools in Victoria and named one of the top 50 in Victoria based on Mathematics and English results in 2015.
  • Maine Township 207 (US), an early adopter of G Suite for Education, created a supportive learning environment that helped maintained high ACT scores even as demographics shifted and the low-income student population grew. This shift in demographics typically puts pressure on test scores, but the support of 1:1 take home Chromebooks helped Maine keep the playing field level for all.

[edu] Maine Township 207 Chart.png

  • Tring School (UK) saw 21% of students perform above their expected level in Science compared to the previous year and 20% more students reach average results in Science over the previous year.
  • In Oshkosh (US) changes to English class instruction improved passing rates in two classes from 75% to 94% and from 82% to 97%. And Oshkosh high schools, which implemented Chromebooks and G Suite first, outperformed the elementary school on measures of collaboration, critical thinking and creativity.
  • At St. Patrick’s College (NZ), Chromebooks enabled a flipped classroom for the Science department. Students receive more tailored feedback, and self-assessment is now seen as an essential step during assignments. Year 9 students saw a 97% pass rate on test designed for Year 12 students.
  • Devonport Boys High School (UK) saw 60% increase in students accessing their accounts outside of school. Students led clubs, campaigns and trips using G Suite for Education tools to work together.

[edu] Devonport Boys High School Graphic.png

Along with the individual cases, we surveyed leaders from across these schools and our initial results from the US found that more than 80% of respondents believe that the use of technology had a strong impact on the district’s vision, culture and ability to deliver professional learning. Three in four respondents report that the use of Google tools had a positive impact on the district budget, and–in a surprise to us–63% said the technology had impacted curriculum.

For additional findings and examples of instructional impact, read the Impact Portraits released on a rolling basis at g.co/EduImpact. For ideas on successful implementation of technology, visit Google for Education’s Transformation Center. And stay tuned to the Google for Education blog for a deeper look into each portrait and more profiles from the US, UK, Sweden, Spain, New Zealand and Australia in the coming months.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/PLqUpGUCWCQ/

Impact Portraits: success stories with Google for Education

Category: Google | Dec 1, 2016

Editor’s Note: We’re often asked by educators, “what impact do you see with Google technology in schools?” Last year we engaged Evergreen Education Group on a journey around the world to answer that question. During Education on Air on Saturday December 3rd, we will share the findings in Impact Portraits. These portraits demonstrate success with Google for Education through the lens of teachers, students and administrators. To hear Linda Darling-Hammond lead a discussion on Impact Portraits, register now for Education On Air.

At Evergreen Education Group we’ve studied K-12 digital education for fourteen years. Among the most important developments we have seen is the proliferation of devices in the classroom, whether through bring-your-own-device, district-led one-to-one programs or other channels. Relatively little study to date has examined how devices are successfully deployed and what their impact has been.

We were therefore thrilled that Google was interested in learning the answers to these questions, and in particular that they understood the study required speaking directly with the district and school leaders, curriculum and instruction specialists, and teachers at the forefront of the use of technology. Particularly they wanted to understand the impact of Chromebooks and G Suite for Education across schools.

Over the course of 16 months we spoke with more than 100 district and school leaders in six countries representing more than 880,000 students, analyzed each school’s documents and data, conducted surveys of administrators, teachers and students, and reviewed surveys the schools conducted. Our goal at every step was to let educators tell their stories, be honest about the challenges and failures, and celebrate the successes in the vein of highlighting these wonderful schools and providing guidance as schools continue down the digital path.

Early in the project we were asked to complete the sentence “Technology in the classroom equals…what?” Our answer: when considered alone, technology equals nothing. Technology is a tool that can be used well, or it can be used poorly. But when technology was combined with four key factors, it could help the school flourish. What are these key factors? Planning, Professional learning, Patience, and Support.

Why are these factors necessary? Because supporting the teachers who are using technology and transforming classrooms takes time—time measured in years, not weeks or months.

What does success look like? It takes different forms. But one common factor is that when educators speak of their success, they rarely lead with technology. Instead they talk about personalization, student engagement, and the role of teachers—all of these supported by technology.

This is about weaving technology into everything we do. Education technology is a tool, not a strategy."

Dr. Mike Pressler

Maine East High School

The findings reveal examples of accomplishment and achievement from schools in different geographic regions, of varied sizes, enrolling a diversity of students. We—and the educators that we interviewed—would never suggest that the use of technology is a silver bullet that will in itself improve student achievement. However, based on our review of these schools, we are confident in saying that technology, when well planned and implemented, can be a key component of a successful digital strategy that has a positive impact on student outcomes.

  • Charlotte-Mecklenburg (US), the world’s largest Chromebook deployment, outperformed the state and other large North Carolina school districts in exceeding student growth expectations in 2015-2016 and saw a 20% increase in graduation rate.

[edu] Charlotte-Mecklenburg Chart.png

  • At McKinnon Secondary College (AU), students are actively driving learning and creating more than 1000 Google Docs each day. McKinnon was ranked 14th among all schools in Victoria and named one of the top 50 in Victoria based on Mathematics and English results in 2015.
  • Maine Township 207 (US), an early adopter of G Suite for Education, created a supportive learning environment that helped maintained high ACT scores even as demographics shifted and the low-income student population grew. This shift in demographics typically puts pressure on test scores, but the support of 1:1 take home Chromebooks helped Maine keep the playing field level for all.

[edu] Maine Township 207 Chart.png

  • Tring School (UK) saw 21% of students perform above their expected level in Science compared to the previous year and 20% more students reach average results in Science over the previous year.
  • In Oshkosh (US) changes to English class instruction improved passing rates in two classes from 75% to 94% and from 82% to 97%. And Oshkosh high schools, which implemented Chromebooks and G Suite first, outperformed the elementary school on measures of collaboration, critical thinking and creativity.
  • At St. Patrick’s College (NZ), Chromebooks enabled a flipped classroom for the Science department. Students receive more tailored feedback, and self-assessment is now seen as an essential step during assignments. Year 9 students saw a 97% pass rate on test designed for Year 12 students.
  • Devonport Boys High School (UK) saw 60% increase in students accessing their accounts outside of school. Students led clubs, campaigns and trips using G Suite for Education tools to work together.

[edu] Devonport Boys High School Graphic.png

Along with the individual cases, we surveyed leaders from across these schools and our initial results from the US found that more than 80% of respondents believe that the use of technology had a strong impact on the district’s vision, culture and ability to deliver professional learning. Three in four respondents report that the use of Google tools had a positive impact on the district budget, and–in a surprise to us–63% said the technology had impacted curriculum.

For additional findings and examples of instructional impact, read the Impact Portraits released on a rolling basis at g.co/EduImpact. For ideas on successful implementation of technology, visit Google for Education’s Transformation Center. And stay tuned to the Google for Education blog for a deeper look into each portrait and more profiles from the US, UK, Sweden, Spain, New Zealand and Australia in the coming months.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/Z2PVuIdAnz8/

Google’s European Growth Engine: 2 million trained and counting

Category: Google | Dec 1, 2016

When we first launched the Growth Engine programme in February 2015 , we set a target of training 1 million Europeans in critical digital skills. Within a year we’d reached our goal, and extended it to 2 million.

Today, we’re delighted to announce that we’ve hit that target –  we’ve now helped 2 million Europeans learn about and improve upon digital skills.

That included people like Carlo Reviglio; now an intern at BikeSquare, a development company that works closely with the Italian tourism company Itaway, which helps tourists rent electric bikes. Carlo learned SEO and digital marketing skills through courses offered as part of Google’s Crescere in Digitale  programme, and was then selected for a traineeship run in partnership with the Italian Ministry of Labour in the framework of the EU Commission Youth Guarantee.  

That traineeship led to his internship with the BikeSquare team, where Carlo has worked to improve the platform’s performance, doubling in the number of e-bike rentals through Itaway in just a year.

Carlo’s success is remarkable–but happily not entirely unique: He’s one of scores of Europeans trained in digital skills through Google programmes. According to the European Commission, almost half the EU population (47%) is not properly digitally skilled, resulting in 700,000 unfilled jobs by 2020 because of this skills gap. Our programmes across Europe have a goal of helping as many people as possible make the most of the digital opportunity brought by the Internet.

With Commissioner Oettinger in Brussels

With Commissioner Oettinger in Brussels

We heard the call from the European Commission and others: we must all work together to fill this skills gap and so today we’re delighted to have this work recognised by Commissioner Günther Oettinger, EU Commissioner for Digital Economy. Today Commissioner Oettinger presented our Growth Engine programme with an award for helping businesses and individuals succeed in digital.

Our programmes cater for everyone from entrepreneurs, to small businesses, to app developers and individuals. People of all ages, backgrounds and interests have taken part in our training programmes.

But there’s still more to be done, and so today we pledged to the EU Digital Skills and Jobs Coalition.

Over the coming year, we pledge to continue to support Europeans to gain essential digital skills through the following initiatives:

  • Digital Workshop – our digital skills training programme which provides free online and offline training training to anyone looking to gain essential digital marketing skills, including young job seekers, entrepreneurs and small businesses.

  • Funding 10,000 Android scholarships via Udacity and in partnership with Bertelsmann for EU mobile developers.

  • Computer Science First – a free program focused on increasing 9-14 yo students’ exposure to computer science education, through after-school and in-school programs led by teachers.

We’ll also be deepening our partnership with national, regional and local governments, as well as private sector businesses, to expand our national training programmes beyond the EU.

My hope is that, a year from now, tens of thousands more Europeans will be able to share similar stories to Carlo’s. There’s so much more to do, and we’re here to help.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/lEFudow5Irk/