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Digital tools are the cherry on top of a local ice cream business

Category: Google | May 11, 2018

Just across the Cuyahoga river and south of Lake Erie sits Ohio City, one of Cleveland’s oldest neighborhoods. This is where Jesse Mason and Helen Qin came across a vacant ice cream store. They already had a mobile ice cream business, Mason’s Creamery, selling cones from a pop-up space. Now they set out to turn the 60-year-old storefront, with “sprinkles from every decade caked into every crevice,” into a permanent location for their sweet treats.

They had a lot of questions. From how to get a business license and secure a health permit to how to build zinc countertops, they went online for help. And since the shop is on a quiet street, its online presence and free Google My Business listing helped Mason’s Creamery scoop up strong reviews and grow its customer base.

Today, the Mason’s duo joined hundreds of other small business owners, students, teachers and job seekers at Grow with Google in Cleveland to share their experience as part of the “Get Found on Search and Maps” workshops (oh, and share their ice cream too!). This community event brings together people from all over the Cleveland area for workshops, one-on-one coaching sessions and hands-on demos to learn new digital skills. To learn how free online tools can help you grow your own skills, career or business, visit google.com/grow.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/6gh8QoOi7XQ/

One student’s quest to track endangered whales with machine learning

Category: Google | May 11, 2018

Ever since I can remember, music has been a huge part of who I am. Growing up, my parents formed a traditional Mexican trio band and their music filled the rooms of my childhood home. I’ve always felt deeply moved by music, and I’m fascinated by the emotions music brings out in people.

When I attended community college and took my first physics course, I was introduced to the science of music—how it’s a complex assembly of overlapping sound waves that we sense from the resulting vibrations created in our eardrums. Though my parents had always taken an artistic approach to playing with soundwaves, I took a scientific one. Studying acoustics opened up all kinds of doors for me I never thought were possible, from pursuing a career in electrical engineering—to studying whale calls using machine learning.

Daniel with his family

Daniel with his family during move in day for his first quarter at Cal Poly.

I applied to the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) summer internship program, where I learned about John Ryan and Danelle Cline’s research using machine learning (ML) to monitor whale sounds. Once again, I found myself fascinated by sound, this time by analyzing the sounds of endangered blue and fin whales to further understand their ecology. By identifying and tracking the whales’ calls and changing migration patterns, scientists hope to gain insight on the broader impacts of climate change on ocean ecology, and how human influence negatively impacts marine life.

MBARI had already collected thousands of hours of audio, but it would have proven too cumbersome of a task to sift through all of that data to find whale calls. That’s what led Danelle to introduce me to machine learning. ML enables us to pick out patterns from very large data sets like MBARI’s audio recordings. By training the model using TensorFlow, we can efficiently sift through the data and track these whales with 98 percent accuracy. This tracking system can tell us how many calls were made in any given amount of time near the Monterey Bay and will enable scientists at MBARI to track their changing migration behavior, and advance their research on whale ecology and how human influence above water negatively impacts marine life below.

What started as a passion for music ended in a love of engineering thanks to the opportunity at MBARI. Before community college I had no idea what an engineer even did, and I certainly never imagined my music background would be relevant in using TensorFlow to identify and classify whale calls within a sea of ocean audio data. But I soon learned there’s more than one way to pursue a passion, and I’m excited for what the future holds—for marine life, for machine learning, and for myself. Following the whales on their journey has led me to begin mine.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/H3Tgd5JI8H4/

Jump for joy: Google Clips captures life’s little moments

Category: Google | May 11, 2018

Two months ago, we launched Google Clips, a lightweight, hands-free camera that captures life’s beautiful and spontaneous moments with the help of machine learning and motion detection. Since then we’ve seen some great clips from moms, dads, and pet owners who have captured candid moments like this, this and this.

When it comes to kids and pets, you never know which moments you’ll want to capture. It’s not just about them smiling, looking at the camera, or posing on request (near-impossible with kids and pets who don’t want to sit still!). You may want to get your daughter jumping up and down in excitement, or your son kissing your cat. It’s all about the little moments and emotions that you can’t stage or coordinate ahead of time.

To help capture these moments, we’re adding improved functionality to Clips so that it’s better at recognizing hugs, kisses, jumps and dance moves. All you need to do is find the best vantage point as you go about your day, and turn Clips on.

We’ve also heard from families using Clips that they want to be able to connect the device with more than one phone, so we’re adding family pairing this month, so that more than one family member can connect their phone to the Clips device to view and share content.

Clips’s improved intelligence can help you capture more of the candid and fleeting moments that happen in between those posed frames we are all so familiar with.

  • Dog-Dancing.gif
  • Mom-and-baby.gif
  • Parents and baby_Clips.gif

If you want to learn more about how Clips knows what makes a moment worth capturing, you can check out all the details on the Research blog.

Look for our May update this week (just in time for Mother’s Day!) on your Clips app and try out the improved functionality. For those of you who are looking to try it out, you can get $50 off in our Mother’s Day promotion.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/ci4yGPKWTRw/

Our preparations for Europe’s new data protection law

Category: Google | May 11, 2018

Last year, we outlined Google’s commitment to comply with Europe’s new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), across all of the services we provide in the European Union. We’ve been working on our compliance efforts for over eighteen months, and ahead of the new law coming into effect, here’s an update on some of the key steps we’ve taken.

Improved user transparency

We’re updating our current Privacy Policy to make it easier to understand what information we collect, and why we collect it. We’ve improved the navigation and organization of the policy to make it easier to find what you’re looking for; explained our practices in more detail and with clearer language; and added more detail about the options you have to manage, export, and delete data from our services. The policy now also includes explanatory videos and illustrations, because a visual description can be easier to understand than text alone. And we’ve made it easier to jump to your privacy settings directly from the policy, helping you make choices about your privacy.

Although we’re taking these steps to make our Privacy Policy easier to understand, it’s important to note that nothing is changing about your current settings or how your information is processed. You’ll continue to have granular control over the data you share with us when you use our services, but with clearer explanations. The updated policy is already available to read and we’ll be emailing all of our users about it individually.

Improved user controls

Every day, nearly 20 million people around the globe visit My Account, our central hub that brings together all the different ways you can review your Google security, privacy and ad settings. As part of our GDPR compliance efforts, we’ve improved both the controls and the clarity of information in My Account so that people are better informed about how and why their data is collected. Within My Account, you can: 

  • Use Activity Controls to choose what activity is saved to your Google Account. We provide simple on/off switches to control Location History, Web and App Activity, YouTube Search History and more, across all devices that are signed in to your account.
  • View or delete data—including search history, location history, browsing history—from our services using My Activity. To make it easier to browse your past online activity, we have given you tools to search by topic, date, and product. You can permanently delete specific activities, entire days or weeks of activity that you don’t want associated with your account.
  • Take a Security Checkup or Privacy Checkup to reassure yourself that your account is secure, and that your privacy settings work for you. We’ve recently added an option that allows you to subscribe to more frequent prompts to take the Privacy Checkup.
  • Manage or mute the ads you see on Google, on websites and in apps using the recently upgraded Ads Settings tool and Mute This Ad control. We have provided more information about how and why certain ads are personalized, and will also be further simplifying the look and feel of these tools in the coming months.
  • Get a clear overview of all the Google products that you use—and the data associated with them—via Google Dashboard. We’ve recently made the Dashboard more mobile-friendly so it’s now easy to use across different devices.

Improved data portability

Since its launch in 2011, people around the world have used our Download Your Data tool to export data from products like Google Photos, Drive, Calendar, Google Play Music and Gmail, either to their own computer, or to storage services like OneDrive, Dropbox and Box. We are further improving and expanding this feature, adding more Google services, including more contextual data controls, and creating a new setting that helps people schedule regular downloads.

Download your Data

While we’ve enabled people to download data from our services for many years, the GDPR encourages companies to enable direct service-to-service data transfers where feasible, for example from Google Photos to another photo service. To support that aim, we’ve recently initiated the Data Transfer Project on GitHub, providing early-stage open source code that will, in time, be of use to any developer wanting to offer seamless transfer of data from one service directly into an alternative (or vice versa).

Parental consent and improved tools for children online

Under the new rules, companies must get consent from parents to process their children’s data in certain circumstances. To obtain that consent and to make sure that parents and children have the tools to manage their online experiences, we’re rolling out Family Link—already available in various countries around the world—throughout the EU.

Through Family Link, parents can create a Google Account for their child and are required to provide consent for certain processing of their child’s data. Family Link also allows parents to set certain digital ground rules on their child’s Android device—like approving or blocking apps, keeping an eye on screen time, or remotely locking their child’s device. We plan to evolve Family Link’s functionality over time, working closely with parents and advocacy groups.

Helping our business customers and partners

The GDPR places new obligations on Google, but also on any business providing services to people in the EU. That includes our partners around the globe: advertisers, publishers, developers and cloud customers. We’ve been working with them to prepare for May 25, consulting with regulators, civil society groups, academics, industry groups and others.

For our advertising partners, we’ve clarified how our advertising policies will change when the GDPR takes effect. We already ask publishers to get consent from their users for the use of our ad tech on their sites and apps under existing legislation, but we’ve now updated that requirement in line with GDPR guidance. We’re also working closely with our publisher partners to provide a range of tools to help them gather user consent, and have built a solution for publishers that want to show non-personalized ads, using only contextual information.

For our Google Cloud customers, we’ve updated our data processing terms for G Suite and Google Cloud Platform and provided detailed information to customers about our approach to data portability, data incident notifications, secure infrastructure and third party audits and certifications, among other features. For more information, see this post on Google Cloud.

Strengthening our privacy compliance program

Over the last decade, Google has built a strong global privacy compliance program, taking advice from regulators around the world. Across the company, we have dedicated teams of engineers and compliance experts who work in full-time privacy roles, ensuring that no Google product launches without a comprehensive privacy review. We’ve now further improved our privacy program, enhancing our product launch review processes, and more comprehensively documenting our processing of data, in line with the accountability requirements of the GDPR.

This is a snapshot of things we’ve done to date to be ready for May 25, 2018. But our commitment to compliance with the GDPR, and the rights it gives people, will continue long beyond this date. As we evolve our products over time, we’ll continue to improve our Privacy Program and the protections we offer to users. Our ambition is to have the highest possible standards of data security and privacy, and to put our users and partners in control.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/tOiJNp4AN7o/

Google Cloud: Ready for GDPR

Category: Google | May 11, 2018

Over a year ago, we wrote about our commitment to GDPR compliance across G Suite and Google Cloud Platform. Google Cloud’s focus on data security, privacy, and transparency provided a strong foundation towards achieving that commitment, and we’ve made multiple updates to ensure that Google Cloud customers can confidently use our services when the GDPR takes effect on May 25.

It’s important to note that GDPR compliance is a shared responsibility. Google Cloud generally acts as a data processor, and as a data processor we process data only as instructed by you—our customers. In turn, you own your data, and Google Cloud is committed to advancing tools and resources that put you in control.

Today, we’d like to highlight some key points for our enterprise customers to assist you along your GDPR journey.

Data processing terms

More than six months ago, well in advance of the GDPR coming into effect, we made important updates to our data processing terms for G Suite1 and Google Cloud Platform designed to directly address GDPR requirements. These contractual updates clearly articulate our privacy commitments to customers, and are fundamental to GDPR compliance for both Google and our Cloud customers. If you’re an existing customer, you’ve received notifications about the new terms. If you haven’t already, you can opt in to the new terms by following the instructions for G Suite and for Google Cloud Platform.

Data portability

The GDPR’s assertion of a right to data portability aligns with our long-held belief that your data belongs to you. Google Cloud’s trust principles affirm that you can access and remove your business’ data whenever you want, and we’ve continually worked to enhance the robustness of our data export capabilities. We’ve introduced an enhanced data export feature to make it even easier to download a copy of your business’ data securely from our G Suite and Cloud Identity services.

Data incident notification

G Suite and Google Cloud Platform have provided contractual commitments to customers around incident notification for many years, and our updated terms reflect the notification timelines for processors put forth in Article 33 of the GDPR. With hundreds of Google engineers across the globe dedicated to security, Google Cloud has and will continue to invest in threat detection, prevention, and incident response capabilities.

Services and infrastructure built to ensure the security of processing

Google Cloud provides solutions that can help organizations keep their sensitive data confidential, available, and resilient. For example, we offer encryption at rest by default. We provide sensitive data classification, discovery, monitoring, and de-identification through our Cloud Data Loss Prevention (DLP) API to help customers manage and protect their data wherever it resides. And we provide notifications and an audit log whenever our support or engineering teams interact with your data and system configurations. You can find more examples on our security page.

Third-party audits and certifications

We regularly test, assess, and evaluate the effectiveness of our technical and organizational security and privacy measures via third-party audits and certifications for G Suite and Google Cloud Platform. These include international standards such as ISO 27001 for information security management systems, ISO 27017 for cloud security controls, and ISO 27018 for protection of personally identifiable information (PII) in public clouds acting as PII processors. These certifications, as well as other third-party audits such as SOC1, SOC2, and SOC3, cover numerous services within Google Cloud. We continue to expand the coverage of our certifications.

International data transfers

To address current EU data protection laws, G Suite and GCP are certified under Privacy Shield. We also offer model contract clauses,affirming that G Suite and GCP contractual commitments fully meet the requirements to legally frame transfers of data from the EU to the rest of the world. The regulatory decisions underlying these data transfer mechanisms remain in force under GDPR.

Educational resources

We provide GDPR-related documentation, white papers, videos, and other useful information for customers on our GDPR Resource Center, and will provide presentations, workshops, and opportunities for customers to engage directly with our compliance team in our global Cloud Summit and Cloud Next events throughout the year.

Finally, we recognize that the GDPR and privacy legislation will evolve. Our team of lawyers, regulatory compliance experts, and public policy specialists are committed to working with regulators to understand and address any new requirements or implementation guidance.

Compliance is central to Google Cloud’s mission of protecting the privacy and security of our customers’ information. We’ll continue our work in this space, and are committed to helping you meet your GDPR compliance needs. For more information, please visit our GDPR Resource Center.

1. G Suite includes G Suite for Business and G Suite for Education

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/d6FB2bioD9o/

Google Cloud: Ready for the GDPR

Category: Google | May 11, 2018

Over a year ago, we wrote about our commitment to GDPR compliance across G Suite and Google Cloud Platform. Google Cloud’s focus on data security, privacy, and transparency provided a strong foundation towards achieving that commitment, and we’ve made multiple updates to ensure that Google Cloud customers can confidently use our services when the GDPR takes effect on May 25.

It’s important to note that GDPR compliance is a shared responsibility. Google Cloud generally acts as a data processor, and as a data processor we process data only as instructed by you—our customers. In turn, you own your data, and Google Cloud is committed to advancing tools and resources that put you in control.

Today, we’d like to highlight some key points for our enterprise customers to assist you along your GDPR journey.

Data processing terms

More than six months ago, well in advance of the GDPR coming into effect, we made important updates to our data processing terms for G Suite1 and Google Cloud Platform designed to directly address GDPR requirements. These contractual updates clearly articulate our privacy commitments to customers, and are fundamental to GDPR compliance for both Google and our Cloud customers. If you’re an existing customer, you’ve received notifications about the new terms. If you haven’t already, you can opt in to the new terms by following the instructions for G Suite and for Google Cloud Platform.

Data portability

The GDPR’s assertion of a right to data portability aligns with our long-held belief that your data belongs to you. Google Cloud’s trust principles affirm that you can access and remove your business’ data whenever you want, and we’ve continually worked to enhance the robustness of our data export capabilities. We’ve introduced an enhanced data export feature to make it even easier to download a copy of your business’ data securely from our G Suite and Cloud Identity services.

Data incident notification

G Suite and Google Cloud Platform have provided contractual commitments to customers around incident notification for many years, and our updated terms reflect the notification timelines for processors put forth in Article 33 of the GDPR. With hundreds of Google engineers across the globe dedicated to security, Google Cloud has and will continue to invest in threat detection, prevention, and incident response capabilities.

Services and infrastructure built to ensure the security of processing

Google Cloud provides solutions that can help organizations keep their sensitive data confidential, available, and resilient. For example, we offer encryption at rest by default. We provide sensitive data classification, discovery, monitoring, and de-identification through our Cloud Data Loss Prevention (DLP) API to help customers manage and protect their data wherever it resides. And we provide notifications and an audit log whenever our support or engineering teams interact with your data and system configurations. You can find more examples on our security page.

Third-party audits and certifications

We regularly test, assess, and evaluate the effectiveness of our technical and organizational security and privacy measures via third-party audits and certifications for G Suite and Google Cloud Platform. These include international standards such as ISO 27001 for information security management systems, ISO 27017 for cloud security controls, and ISO 27018 for protection of personally identifiable information (PII) in public clouds acting as PII processors. These certifications, as well as other third-party audits such as SOC1, SOC2, and SOC3, cover numerous services within Google Cloud. We continue to expand the coverage of our certifications.

International data transfers

To address current EU data protection laws, G Suite and GCP are certified under Privacy Shield. We also offer model contract clauses,affirming that G Suite and GCP contractual commitments fully meet the requirements to legally frame transfers of data from the EU to the rest of the world. The regulatory decisions underlying these data transfer mechanisms remain in force under GDPR.

Educational resources

We provide GDPR-related documentation, white papers, videos, and other useful information for customers on our GDPR Resource Center, and will provide presentations, workshops, and opportunities for customers to engage directly with our compliance team in our global Cloud Summit and Cloud Next events throughout the year.

Finally, we recognize that the GDPR and privacy legislation will evolve. Our team of lawyers, regulatory compliance experts, and public policy specialists are committed to working with regulators to understand and address any new requirements or implementation guidance.

Compliance is central to Google Cloud’s mission of protecting the privacy and security of our customers’ information. We’ll continue our work in this space, and are committed to helping you meet your GDPR compliance needs. For more information, please visit our GDPR Resource Center.

1. G Suite includes G Suite for Business and G Suite for Education

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/d6FB2bioD9o/

Batik Njawani: the art and craft of an online business

Category: Google | May 10, 2018

One of the Indonesian batik fabric designs sold at Batik Njawani


Editor’s note: As part of our series of interviews with people across Asia-Pacific who use the Internet as a tool to connect, create and grow, we spoke with Jajang Nurzamzam, the owner of Batik Njawani, an Indonesian handicrafts store. The internet has helped Jajang grow his business and provide a livelihood for 10 Indonesian artisans that make the products he sells. 


Tell us about yourself and Batik Njawani.  

Actually, Batik Njawani was established by my wife’s family. Growing up, I never thought I would manage a business. After I graduated from vocational school, my first job was as a sales representative for a financial services company. When I married my wife, I decided to help her with the family business. You could say that I only became an entrepreneur by marriage!

Batik Njawani specializes in Indonesian handicrafts. We source our handmade products from craftspeople in Yogyakarta, which is a well-known center for Javanese culture and artisans in Indonesia.

Jajangandfamily

Batik Njawani owner Jajang Nurzamzam and his family.

Why did you decide to create an online presence for your business?

It can be hard to stand out from the crowd when there are so many handicraft shops in Indonesia. Before going online, our business relied on  a few customers who were familiar with us. If they didn’t place orders, there were no sales! This was stressful for us, not to mention the artisans who depended on our shop to make a living.

I had absolutely no experience in marketing, but I was determined to find a more sustainable business model. So I used Google Search to find out how I could get more customers. That’s how I discovered Google My Business. I registered Batik Njawani, and posted some photos and location details of it online with just a few taps on my mobile phone. I was surprised by how easy it was to create an online presence!

How has being online changed your business?

The impact has been tremendous. Demand for our products has taken off. After we established our Google My Business listing, an order was placed for 6,000 key chains and 6,000 hair pieces for an international arts festival in Belgium. It was our first international customer and we were incredibly excited to deliver our first export. Today, online orders make up about half of our sales.

The Internet has helped us build a community of customers and craftspeople. Our online presence provides a steady stream of customers, which in turn lets us keep our artisans in steady employment. The Internet helps us build trust with potential customers who are unfamiliar with our brand, but are reassured by the positive reviews they read on Google My Business.

batik pouch

Batik pouches, one of the handicrafts sold at Batik Njawani

What’s next for your business?

The demand created by online orders allows us to employ 10 artisans in Yogyakarta. They gain a predictable source of income that lets them support their families. Besides a growing business, the real reward is knowing that our work allows them to continue with their traditional craft-making, which helps to preserve and promote Indonesian culture. As our business expands, we hope to be able to support more of our local artisans. I also hope to introduce Indonesian culture to the world by exporting more of our handicrafts.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/zQAnBfVpYB4/

Building accessible products for everyone

Category: Google | May 10, 2018

Over one billion people—15 percent of the population—live with some kind of disability, and this number will continue to rise as people get older and live longer. At Google I/O this week, we shared a few new ways that we’re helping people with disabilities. Here’s a bit more about these new products, as well as a behind-the-scenes look at how we designed I/O to make it more accessible and enjoyable for everyone:

3:36 Shennice Cleckley: One-woman show Google 61K views   1:07:47 #madebygoogle Google Recommended for you   1:10:15 Tech Talk: Linus Torvalds on git Google Recommended for you   1:05 Announcing the Lookout app Google 29K views New   1:14 Tour Creator- Show people your world Google 16K views New  Hey Google: How to get movie tickets with your Google Assistant Google 32K views New  Google Maps Navigation (Beta) Google Recommended for you  Detecting cancer in real-time with machine learning Google 123K views  Service Brewing Company: On a mission Google 65K views  Introducing Google Nose Google Recommended for you  Take Your Child to Work Day at Google 2018 Google 109K views  Learning “what architecture really means” with some help from Pixelbook Google 32K views  Google's US Data Centers Google 82K views  Making every phone smarter with Federated Learning Google 60K views New  A Chrome Superhero Google Recommended for you  Accessibility at Google I/O: Working to Make Events More Inclusive

Lookout:

Lookout is a new Android app designed to help people who are blind or visually impaired gain more independence by giving auditory cues about objects, text and people around them. People simply wear a Pixel device on a lanyard around their neck, with the camera pointing away from their body, and the app shares relevant information about the things around them, as they move through a space. Lookout is a big step in an effort to use technology to make the ever-changing and evolving world around us more tangible to people. It uses AI technology to bridge the virtual world with the physical world, making day to day tasks and interactions a little easier.

Announcing the Lookout app
Morse Code on Gboard

Now, people who communicate using Morse code can do so on Gboard. To do this, we collaborated closely with Tania Finlayson, who was born with cerebral palsy and is an expert in Morse code assistive technology. Tania has been using Morse code to communicate since the 1980s, and she’s also the designer and co-developer of the TandemMaster. Her insights into the nuances of Morse code as an alternative assistive technology were invaluable throughout the design process, and by bringing Morse code to Gboard, we hope that more people might also be able to use Morse to communicate more freely. To get Morse for Gboard beta and to learn how to type Morse code, go to g.co/morse. This feature is currently available in the public beta version of Gboard, and will roll out more widely on Gboard for Android in the coming weeks.

Tania’s Story: Morse code meets machine learning

YouTube Live Automatic Captions

In February, we announced that YouTube is bringing English automatic captions to live streams, and have been slowly rolling it out. With our new live automatic captions, creators have a quick and inexpensive way to make live streams more accessible to more people. With our speech recognition (LASR) technology, you’ll get captions with error rates and latency approaching industry standards.

LSAR

Also at I/O, we introduced more features that developers can use to create more accessible app experiences for users with disabilities, including new accessibility testing, best practices and APIs for Android P.

Time and time again, we’ve seen the benefits of not just designing for one person or one community, but with them. By working together, we can truly make technology more available and useful to everyone.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/65OUynqqo1M/

6 ways Quizzes in Google Forms are getting smarter

Category: Google | May 10, 2018

Editor’s note: For Teacher Appreciation Week, we’re highlighting how Google supports teachers—and today, we’re announcing six improvements to Quizzes in Google Forms to help teachers save time. Stay tuned here and follow along on Twitter throughout the week to see how we’re celebrating.

In the two years since we launched Quizzes in Google Forms, educators have expanded the possibilities of the tool both inside and outside the classroom. Today, we’re announcing six new features based on valuable feedback from teachers and designed to help educators continue using Quizzes in Google Forms in creative ways:

1. Quiz answer suggestions: Using Google’s machine learning, Forms can now predict the correct answer as a teacher types the question, as well as provide options for wrong answers. If you give a pop quiz on U.S. capitals, this new feature will predict all the right capitals for every single state—and even throw in some curveballs, like Charlotte Amalie and San Juan.

FormsLaunchCorrectAnswer.gif

2. Autocomplete answers:Machine learning is also helping educators save time with more predictive analysis. After you type one answer, Forms will now propose related answers. For example, if a question requires the days of the week as answer options, Google Forms will autocomplete the remaining answers. Additionally, this feature is now available in 14 languages, including Spanish, French, Chinese, German and Arabic. “I love this feature, it saves so much time. The ability to start typing something and have Forms start suggesting things before you’re even done typing is pretty cool,” says Chris Webb, a math teacher at John Rennie High School in Montreal.

Autocomplete answers

3. Automatically grade checkbox and multiple choice grid questions:Grading quizzes can be time consuming, which is why we built a new way to automate the process. Now, in checkbox grid and multiple choice grid-style questions, you can denote correct answers in the answer key, and completed quizzes are automatically assigned points based on answers. “Previously, there was a lot of repetition for teachers trying to ask these types of questions. But this [feature] saves time, collects all the data in a sheet in a way that’s really smart, and gives teachers full control over grading,” says Webb.

Automatically grade checkbox and multiple choice grid questions
4. Give decimal grades:You can give partial credit on a paper quiz, and now you have the same flexibility in Google Forms. If an answer is partially correct, you can give a half or quarter point, making grades more precise. Like all grades in Google Forms, these are automatically added up and can be synced with Google Classroom.

5. Improve understanding with YouTube video feedback:You can now give highly customized feedback to students by attaching a video from YouTube. If a student doesn’t understand a concept or could use extra practice, link them to any YouTube video so they can review material on their own.

EDU_VideoFeedback.gif

6. See the total number of points in a quiz:Teachers told us they would like a way to quickly reference the total number of points in a quiz as they’re editing. Now, there’s a tally of points at the top of the quiz that updates as you create or edit questions.

These updates are rolling out over the next couple weeks. With Google’s machine learning within Forms, creating quizzes and grading is now faster, easier, and more automated and customizable than ever before. We hope these new features give even more time back to hard-working educators!

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/CHWQ5rUS3U8/

How TensorFlow is powering technology around the world

Category: Google | May 9, 2018

Editor’s Note: AI is behind many of Google’s products and is a big priority for us as a company (as you may have heard at Google I/O yesterday). So we’re sharing highlights on how AI already affects your life in ways you might not know, and how people from all over the world have used AI to build their own technology.

Machine learning is at the core of many of Google’s own products, but TensorFlow—our open source machine learning framework—has also been an essential component of the work of scientists, researchers and even high school students around the world. At Google I/O, we’re hearing from some of these people, who are solving big (we mean, big) problems—the origin of the universe, that sort of stuff. Here are some of the interesting ways they’re using TensorFlow to aid their work.

Ari Silburt, a Ph.D. student at Penn State University, wants to uncover the origins of our solar system. In order to do this, he has to map craters in the solar system, which helps him figure out where matter has existed in various places (and at various times) in the solar system. You with us? Historically, this process has been done by hand and is both time consuming and subjective, but Ari and his team turned to TensorFlow to automate it. They’ve trained the machine learning model using existing photos of the moon, and have identified more than 6,000 new craters.

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On the left is a picture of the moon, hard to tell where the heck those craters are. On the right we have an accurate depiction of crater distribution thanks to TensorFlow.

Switching from outer space to the rainforests of Brazil: Topher White (founder of Rainforest Connection) invented “The Guardian” device to prevent illegal deforestation in the Amazon. The devices—which are upcycled cell phones running on Tensorflow—are installed in trees throughout the forest, recognize the sound of chainsaws and logging trucks, and alert the rangers who police the area. Without these devices, the land must be policed by people, which is nearly impossible given the massive area it covers.

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Topher installs guardian devices in the tall trees of the Amazon

Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the fastest growing cause of blindness, with nearly 415 million diabetic patients at risk worldwide. If caught early, the disease can be treated; if not, it can lead to irreversible blindness. In 2016, we announced that machine learning was being used to aid diagnostic efforts in the area of DR, by analyzing a patient’s fundus image (photo of the back of the eye) with higher accuracy. Now we’re taking those fundus images to the next level with TensorFlow. Dr. Jorge Cuadros, an optometrist in Oakland, CA, is able to determine a patient’s risk of cardiovascular disease by analyzing their fundus image with a deep learning model.

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Fundus image of an eye with sight-threatening retinal disease. With machine learning this image will tell doctors much more than eye health.

Good news for green thumbs of the world, Shaza Mehdi and Nile Ravenell are high school students who developed PlantMD, an app that lets you figure out if your plant is diseased. The machine learning model runs on TensorFlow, and Shaza and Nile used data from plantvillage.com and a few university databases to train the model to recognize diseased plants. Shaza also built another app that uses a similar approach to diagnose skin disease.

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PlantMD in action

To learn more about how AI can bring benefits to everyone, check out ai.google.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/cl9jZnyk-LM/