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The She Word: Monique Vaz Vieira, keeping the “bad guys” away

Category: Google | Mar 16, 2017

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’re celebrating the powerful, dynamic and creative women of Google. Like generations before them, these women break down barriers and defy expectations at work and in their communities. Over the course of the month, we’ll help you get to know a few of these Google women, and share a bit about who they are and why they inspire us.

In today’s installment of the “She Word” series, we talked to Monique Vaz Vieira, a 10-year Googler and software engineer in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

Why are you proud to be a woman at Google?

As a senior female engineer, I’m proud to be a woman in a male-dominated industry. I’m also proud to be the Latin America regional tech lead for Women@Google, an internal community that empowers female Googlers with professional development and networking. I’ve been a Googler for more than 10 years (55 percent of its existence as a company!), and I’ve felt supported to pursue my professional and personal goals throughout all of those years.

monique

Monique adventuring with her two kids.

How do you explain your job at a dinner party?

My team keeps the bad guys away—our mission is to keep users safe and our products free of spam and abuse.

What’s your favorite thing to do outside of work?

I enjoy all things related to food—I love trying out new recipes (my current favorite is paella) and I grow my own vegetables, herbs and fruit. I’ve recently rediscovered my passion for off-road adventures after a family trip to Lavras Novas (about 70 miles outside of Belo Horizonte), where we explored waterfalls and dirt trails.

What advice would you give to women starting out in
their careers?

When I started out in my career, I wish someone would have told me, “don’t be afraid to be yourself.” People are different and won’t necessarily take the same path to succeed, so you need to find your own.

What did you want to be when you grew up?

When I was little I wanted to be an astronaut or a ballet dancer, but when I was a bit older, I wanted to be an architect. I crossed astronaut and dancer from my list, but I still consider studying architecture.

What’s your life motto?

I constantly remind myself that life should be enjoyed every single day. It’s easy to fall into the trap of making great plans for the weekend or even for when you retire, but you forget to take advantage of all the opportunities you have right now and really enjoy the present.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/PLFWnoCrdC4/

The She Word: Monique Vaz Vieira, keeping the “bad guys” away

Category: Google | Mar 16, 2017

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’re celebrating the powerful, dynamic and creative women of Google. Like generations before them, these women break down barriers and defy expectations at work and in their communities. Over the course of the month, we’ll help you get to know a few of these Google women, and share a bit about who they are and why they inspire us.

In today’s installment of the “She Word” series, we talked to Monique Vaz Vieira, a 10-year Googler and software engineer in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

Why are you proud to be a woman at Google?

As a senior female engineer, I’m proud to be a woman in a male-dominated industry. I’m also proud to be the Latin America regional tech lead for Women@Google, an internal community that empowers female Googlers with professional development and networking. I’ve been a Googler for more than 10 years (55 percent of its existence as a company!), and I’ve felt supported to pursue my professional and personal goals throughout all of those years.

monique

Monique adventuring with her two kids.

How do you explain your job at a dinner party?

My team keeps the bad guys away—our mission is to keep users safe and our products free of spam and abuse.

What’s your favorite thing to do outside of work?

I enjoy all things related to food—I love trying out new recipes (my current favorite is paella) and I grow my own vegetables, herbs and fruit. I’ve recently rediscovered my passion for off-road adventures after a family trip to Lavras Novas (about 70 miles outside of Belo Horizonte), where we explored waterfalls and dirt trails.

What advice would you give to women starting out in
their careers?

When I started out in my career, I wish someone would have told me, “don’t be afraid to be yourself.” People are different and won’t necessarily take the same path to succeed, so you need to find your own.

What did you want to be when you grew up?

When I was little I wanted to be an astronaut or a ballet dancer, but when I was a bit older, I wanted to be an architect. I crossed astronaut and dancer from my list, but I still consider studying architecture.

What’s your life motto?

I constantly remind myself that life should be enjoyed every single day. It’s easy to fall into the trap of making great plans for the weekend or even for when you retire, but you forget to take advantage of all the opportunities you have right now and really enjoy the present.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/w7UihHDbt_8/

Google Cloud partner awards: recognizing customer success and solution innovation

Category: Google | Mar 16, 2017

Last week at Google Cloud Next ‘17, we recognized 12 partners for their strong customer success and solution innovation over the past year. These partners—our 2016 Global Partner Award winners—exemplify the dedication, expertise and innovation that our customers count on.

Recognizing solution innovation

Five technology partners were recognized for their technology expertise and commitment to delivering valuable products and solutions for customers. Our 2016 Global Partner Award winners for Solution Innovation are:

partner-summit-awards-8

LumApps team celebrating their Solution Innovation Award presented by Nan Boden, Head of Global Technology Partners for Google Cloud

Recognizing customer success

Sales and services partners nurture and support customer transformation and innovation. We recognized four sales and services partners that demonstrate outstanding sales, marketing and technical expertise to help businesses of all sizes transform with Google Cloud. Our 2016 Global Partner Awards winners for Customer Success are:

On the devices side, we recognized SYNNEX Corporation for its built services, technologies and support to augment and enhance the Google device ecosystem.

In addition to our global winners, we also recognized partners by region:

2016 partners of the year

The Global Partner of the Year award recognizes organizations that are deeply committed to delivering value to Google Cloud customers, working with our teams at every level to push the boundaries of what we deliver to our joint customers.

  • Global Technology Partner of the Year: Pivotal
  • Global Sales and Services Partner of the Year: Accenture

partner-summit-awards-9

Bertrand Yansouni, VP of Global Partner Sales and Strategic Alliances for Google Cloud presenting Global Sales and Services Partner of the Year Award to Lisa Noon, Global Managing Director at Accenture.

Thank you to the Google Cloud ecosystem

These partners are a representation of the many partners doing incredible work across the Google Cloud ecosystem. Thank you to every partner helping our customers innovate faster, scale smarter and stay secure—and congratulations to the 2016 Google Cloud partner award winners.

partner-summit-awards-6

Award recipients received a baseball bat customized with their award designation at AT&T Park, home of the San Francisco Giants.

partner-summit-awards-2

Nan Boden, Head of Global Technology Partners for Google Cloud and Andy Horwitz, Senior Director of Business and Corporate Development for Palo Alto Networks

partner-summit-awards-1

All twelve partner teams onstage for a group photo

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/-4ozCI98Ej0/

Google Cloud partner awards: recognizing customer success and solution innovation

Category: Google | Mar 16, 2017

Last week at Google Cloud Next ‘17, we recognized 12 partners for their strong customer success and solution innovation over the past year. These partners—our 2016 Global Partner Award winners—exemplify the dedication, expertise and innovation that our customers count on.

Recognizing solution innovation

Five technology partners were recognized for their technology expertise and commitment to delivering valuable products and solutions for customers. Our 2016 Global Partner Award winners for Solution Innovation are:

partner-summit-awards-8

LumApps team celebrating their Solution Innovation Award presented by Nan Boden, Head of Global Technology Partners for Google Cloud

Recognizing customer success

Sales and services partners nurture and support customer transformation and innovation. We recognized four sales and services partners that demonstrate outstanding sales, marketing and technical expertise to help businesses of all sizes transform with Google Cloud. Our 2016 Global Partner Awards winners for Customer Success are:

On the devices side, we recognized SYNNEX Corporation for its built services, technologies and support to augment and enhance the Google device ecosystem.

In addition to our global winners, we also recognized partners by region:

2016 partners of the year

The Global Partner of the Year award recognizes organizations that are deeply committed to delivering value to Google Cloud customers, working with our teams at every level to push the boundaries of what we deliver to our joint customers.

  • Global Technology Partner of the Year: Pivotal
  • Global Sales and Services Partner of the Year: Accenture

partner-summit-awards-9

Bertrand Yansouni, VP of Global Partner Sales and Strategic Alliances for Google Cloud presenting Global Sales and Services Partner of the Year Award to Lisa Noon, Global Managing Director at Accenture.

Thank you to the Google Cloud ecosystem

These partners are a representation of the many partners doing incredible work across the Google Cloud ecosystem. Thank you to every partner helping our customers innovate faster, scale smarter and stay secure—and congratulations to the 2016 Google Cloud partner award winners.

partner-summit-awards-6

Award recipients received a baseball bat customized with their award designation at AT&T Park, home of the San Francisco Giants.

partner-summit-awards-2

Nan Boden, Head of Global Technology Partners for Google Cloud and Andy Horwitz, Senior Director of Business and Corporate Development for Palo Alto Networks

partner-summit-awards-1

All twelve partner teams onstage for a group photo

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/f0b8mt59M1o/

See Our Latest Data Center Murals

Category: Google | Mar 15, 2017

Last May, we announced the Data Center Mural Project, a partnership with artists to bring a bit of the magic from the inside of our data centers to the outside. Two artists in Oklahoma and Belgium created murals that celebrate both the work that happens inside the buildings and the communities where the data centers reside.

Today, we’re excited to unveil our next two data center murals.

In Council Bluffs, Iowa, painter Gary Kelley’s mural shows how Council Bluffs has served as a hub of information for centuries. Ideas have always flowed through the region, from Lewis and Clark to the Transcontinental Railroad, and now the data center in Council Bluffs is helping bring the internet to people all over the world. 

In Dublin, Ireland, illustrator Fuchsia MacAree was inspired by how Ireland’s unique climate and fresh air, rather than mechanical cooling, regulates the temperature of Google’s data center. She’s created a series of whimsical murals depicting a windy day in Dublin, including scenes from local landmarks like Grand Canal Square, Phoenix Park and Moore Street Market.

Check out photos and videos of all the data center murals at g.co/datacentermurals.

1

The panels of the mural in Council Bluffs chronicle its people and history. From right to left: Lewis and Clark in their first council with the native people of the region, a telegrapher and the first transcontinental telegraph, a member of the Otoe tribe, a surveyor for the transcontinental railroad, and Googlers working at the data center.

2

The largest of the murals created for the Dublin data center is placed on one of the louvered walls that allow fresh Irish air to pass freely into the building and efficiently cool the servers inside.

3

On this wall, Fuchsia illustrates Phoenix Park in Dublin. You can see the park’s free roaming deer and Tea Rooms.


From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/x_W1JpkxB64/

See Our Latest Data Center Murals

Category: Google | Mar 15, 2017

Last May, we announced the Data Center Mural Project, a partnership with artists to bring a bit of the magic from the inside of our data centers to the outside. Two artists in Oklahoma and Belgium created murals that celebrate both the work that happens inside the buildings and the communities where the data centers reside.

Today, we’re excited to unveil our next two data center murals.

In Council Bluffs, Iowa, painter Gary Kelley’s mural shows how Council Bluffs has served as a hub of information for centuries. Ideas have always flowed through the region, from Lewis and Clark to the Transcontinental Railroad, and now the data center in Council Bluffs is helping bring the internet to people all over the world. 

In Dublin, Ireland, illustrator Fuchsia MacAree was inspired by how Ireland’s unique climate and fresh air, rather than mechanical cooling, regulates the temperature of Google’s data center. She’s created a series of whimsical murals depicting a windy day in Dublin, including scenes from local landmarks like Grand Canal Square, Phoenix Park and Moore Street Market.

Check out photos and videos of all the data center murals at g.co/datacentermurals.

1

The panels of the mural in Council Bluffs chronicle its people and history. From right to left: Lewis and Clark in their first council with the native people of the region, a telegrapher and the first transcontinental telegraph, a member of the Otoe tribe, a surveyor for the transcontinental railroad, and Googlers working at the data center.

2

The largest of the murals created for the Dublin data center is placed on one of the louvered walls that allow fresh Irish air to pass freely into the building and efficiently cool the servers inside.

3

On this wall, Fuchsia illustrates Phoenix Park in Dublin. You can see the park’s free roaming deer and Tea Rooms.


From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/lX2UwWrhCr4/

Google Classroom: Now open to even more learners

Category: Google | Mar 15, 2017

When you picture a “typical” classroom, what do you see? A chalkboard, desks in neat rows, and kids with backpacks? In today’s world, we know that learning can happen almost anywhere, both in and outside of school. A kitchen table might be the go-to desk for a homeschooled student, a community center might host an after-school program for coding, and a nonprofit organization might hold a workshop for adults on resume writing and job skills.

We see value in bringing technology to people who want to learn, no matter the setting. That’s why we’re opening up Google Classroom to users without G Suite for Education accounts. Now, teachers and students in many different environments can teach or attend classes, manage assignments and instantly collaborate—all with their personal Google accounts. Starting today, these new Classroom users will be able to join existing classes and over the coming weeks, they’ll have the ability to create their own classes as well. Schools interested in using Google Classroom should still sign up for G Suite for Education.

Classroom for consumer launch.gif

Starting today, G Suite for Education administrators will see updated Classroom settings that give them new controls over who can join their classes from personal Google accounts or from other G Suite for Education domains. This update gives schools more flexibility in how they collaborate with other organizations and students: For example, student teachers or visiting students can now easily integrate into their host school or university’s Classroom set-up.

Over the past few months, we’ve worked with a number of organizations to understand how a more open Classroom can meet their needs. Youth For Understanding (YFU) is an organization that hosts virtual exchange programs for students who could not otherwise study abroad. YFU piloted Classroom during a 15-week virtual exchange among students from 5 countries, with 700 students and 24 facilitators.

YFU found Classroom valuable because it worked across devices and needed nothing more than an Internet connection. Using Classroom, YFU reported that “the ‘technological intimidation factor’ was no longer the primary challenge in running virtual exchanges.” Instead, the organization can put their focus where it belongs—on the program’s intercultural content.

We believe that Classroom can make technology work effectively in any learning relationship between an instructor and student, no matter what shape that takes. We’re excited to see new educators and learners join the Classroom community, and are looking forward to seeing how they’ll use it to meet their needs. Whether you’re a homeschooling parent or an instructor at a tutoring center, we’d love to hear your stories about how Classroom helps foster teaching and learning as you try it with your students. You can also continue to share feedback with us directly in Classroom. And if you have further questions, check out our FAQ to learn more about these changes.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/UhZfgOuRIjs/

Introducing the Family Link app: Helping families navigate technology together

Category: Google | Mar 15, 2017

The devices we carry every day open up a world of information for us to explore, sparking our curiosity and creativity. But when it comes to our kids using those same devices, it’s tricky. We want them to explore and be inspired as they embark on their digital adventure, but every family feels differently about what their kids should and shouldn’t be able to do on their device. That’s why we developed the Family Link app. When your child is ready for their first Android device, Family Link lets you create a Google Account for them, which is like your own account, and also helps you set certain digital ground rules that work for your family – like managing the apps your kid can use, keeping an eye on screen time, and setting a bedtime on your kid’s device.

Here’s how it works: First, your kid will need a new device that runs Android Nougat (7.0) or higher. Then, download Family Link onto your device and create a Google Account for them through the app. Finally, sign them into their new device, and you can then use Family Link to:

Manage the apps your kid can use

Approve or block the apps your kid wants to download from the Google Play Store.

Screenshot: Manage the apps your kid can use

Keep an eye on screen time

See how much time your kid spends on their favorite apps with weekly or monthly activity reports, and set daily screen time limits for their device.

Screenshot: Keep an eye on screentime

Set device bedtime

Remotely lock your kid’s device when it’s time to play, study, or sleep.

Screenshot: Set a bedtime

Starting today, parents across the U.S. can request an invite to the Family Link early access program. After receiving an invite, parents with kids under 13 years old can download and try the Family Link app. We’re just getting started, and we’ll be asking parents using Family Link for feedback about how to improve the experience before we make the app broadly available.

While Family Link can help you set certain ground rules around how your child uses their device, it can’t make the apps or services on their phone that were designed for adults kid-safe; it’s up to parents to choose what’s right for their kid. When you make the decision to give your child their own device, Family Link can serve as a tool that keeps you in the loop as they begin to explore.

To learn more about the Family Link early access program and request an invitation, visit our Family Link website.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/TZJX1Z6JDCQ/

Google Classroom: Now open to even more learners

Category: Google | Mar 15, 2017

When you picture a “typical” classroom, what do you see? A chalkboard, desks in neat rows, and kids with backpacks? In today’s world, we know that learning can happen almost anywhere, both in and outside of school. A kitchen table might be the go-to desk for a homeschooled student, a community center might host an after-school program for coding, and a nonprofit organization might hold a workshop for adults on resume writing and job skills.

We see value in bringing technology to people who want to learn, no matter the setting. That’s why we’re opening up Google Classroom to users without G Suite for Education accounts. Now, teachers and students in many different environments can teach or attend classes, manage assignments and instantly collaborate—all with their personal Google accounts. Starting today, these new Classroom users will be able to join existing classes and over the coming weeks, they’ll have the ability to create their own classes as well. Schools interested in using Google Classroom should still sign up for G Suite for Education.

Classroom for consumer launch.gif

Starting today, G Suite for Education administrators will see updated Classroom settings that give them new controls over who can join their classes from personal Google accounts or from other G Suite for Education domains. This update gives schools more flexibility in how they collaborate with other organizations and students: For example, student teachers or visiting students can now easily integrate into their host school or university’s Classroom set-up.

Over the past few months, we’ve worked with a number of organizations to understand how a more open Classroom can meet their needs. Youth For Understanding (YFU) is an organization that hosts virtual exchange programs for students who could not otherwise study abroad. YFU piloted Classroom during a 15-week virtual exchange among students from 5 countries, with 700 students and 24 facilitators.

YFU found Classroom valuable because it worked across devices and needed nothing more than an Internet connection. Using Classroom, YFU reported that “the ‘technological intimidation factor’ was no longer the primary challenge in running virtual exchanges.” Instead, the organization can put their focus where it belongs—on the program’s intercultural content.

We believe that Classroom can make technology work effectively in any learning relationship between an instructor and student, no matter what shape that takes. We’re excited to see new educators and learners join the Classroom community, and are looking forward to seeing how they’ll use it to meet their needs. Whether you’re a homeschooling parent or an instructor at a tutoring center, we’d love to hear your stories about how Classroom helps foster teaching and learning as you try it with your students. You can also continue to share feedback with us directly in Classroom. And if you have further questions, check out our FAQ to learn more about these changes.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/QO3qRkRyQfY/

Introducing the Family Link app: Helping families navigate technology together

Category: Google | Mar 15, 2017

The devices we carry every day open up a world of information for us to explore, sparking our curiosity and creativity. But when it comes to our kids using those same devices, it’s tricky. We want them to explore and be inspired as they embark on their digital adventure, but every family feels differently about what their kids should and shouldn’t be able to do on their device. That’s why we developed the Family Link app. When your child is ready for their first Android device, Family Link lets you create a Google Account for them, which is like your own account, and also helps you set certain digital ground rules that work for your family – like managing the apps your kid can use, keeping an eye on screen time, and setting a bedtime on your kid’s device.

Here’s how it works: First, your kid will need a new device that runs Android Nougat (7.0) or higher. Then, download Family Link onto your device and create a Google Account for them through the app. Finally, sign them into their new device, and you can then use Family Link to:

Manage the apps your kid can use

Approve or block the apps your kid wants to download from the Google Play Store.

Manage the apps_Families.png

Keep an eye on screen time

See how much time your kid spends on their favorite apps with weekly or monthly activity reports, and set daily screen time limits for their device.

Keep an eye on screentime_Families.png

Set device bedtime

Remotely lock your kid’s device when it’s time to play, study, or sleep.

Set a bedtime_Families.png

Starting today, parents across the U.S. can request an invite to the Family Link early access program. After receiving an invite, parents with kids under 13 years old can download and try the Family Link app. We’re just getting started, and we’ll be asking parents using Family Link for feedback about how to improve the experience before we make the app broadly available.

While Family Link can help you set certain ground rules around how your child uses their device, it can’t make the apps or services on their phone that were designed for adults kid-safe; it’s up to parents to choose what’s right for their kid. When you make the decision to give your child their own device, Family Link can serve as a tool that keeps you in the loop as they begin to explore.

To learn more about the Family Link early access program and request an invitation, visit our Family Link website.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/tNYbXrbp_xw/