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Google Play Music teams up with Samsung to deliver the right music for you

Category: Google | Apr 21, 2017

With the new Google Play Music—a smarter, more assistive music streaming service—we strive to deliver the right song at the right time and place to more people. That’s why we’ve teamed up with Samsung, the world’s largest Android smartphone maker, in a partnership to make it even easier and faster for Samsung customers to get the right music no matter where they are or what they’re doing.

Starting today with the launch of the Galaxy S8 and the Galaxy S8+, Google Play Music will be the default music player and music service on new Samsung phones and tablets globally. We’re also collaborating with Samsung to create special features in Google Play Music just for Samsung customers.

For starters, if you have a new Samsung phone or tablet, you can now upload and stream up to 100,000 of your own songs to Google Play Music for free. With twice as much storage capacity offered exclusively to Samsung customers, it’s easier than ever to migrate your personal music collection from any service to Google Play Music.

GPM + Samsung v6

In addition, new Samsung phones and tablets will now come with a free three-month trial of Google Play Music. With a subscription, you’ll get ad-free and on-demand access to more than 40 million songs and thousands of playlists tailored for any mood or occasion. You’ll also get access to YouTube Red (where available), so you can enjoy all of your favorite videos with no ads.

It doesn’t stop there—just like our integration with the Assistant on Google Home, Google Play Music will work with Bixby, Samsung’s new intelligent interface, when it launches later this spring. Subscribers will be able to ask Bixby to play their favorite song or music for dancing and it’ll start playing on Google Play Music instantly.

We’re thrilled to bring this special version of Google Play Music to Samsung customers anywhere, and we look forward to bringing the best music experience to your Samsung device. Together, we’re committed to delivering the perfect soundtrack to make your everyday moments better.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/9HhfpCCB5SE/

Google Play Music teams up with Samsung to deliver the right music for you

Category: Google | Apr 21, 2017

With the new Google Play Music—a smarter, more assistive music streaming service—we strive to deliver the right song at the right time and place to more people. That’s why we’ve teamed up with Samsung, the world’s largest Android smartphone maker, in a partnership to make it even easier and faster for Samsung customers to get the right music no matter where they are or what they’re doing.

Starting today with the launch of the Galaxy S8 and the Galaxy S8+, Google Play Music will be the default music player and music service on new Samsung phones and tablets globally. We’re also collaborating with Samsung to create special features in Google Play Music just for Samsung customers.

For starters, if you have a new Samsung phone or tablet, you can now upload and stream up to 100,000 of your own songs to Google Play Music for free. With twice as much storage capacity offered exclusively to Samsung customers, it’s easier than ever to migrate your personal music collection from any service to Google Play Music.

GPM + Samsung Image

In addition, new Samsung phones and tablets will now come with a free three-month trial of Google Play Music. With a subscription, you’ll get ad-free and on-demand access to more than 40 million songs and thousands of playlists tailored for any mood or occasion. You’ll also get access to YouTube Red (where available), so you can enjoy all of your favorite videos with no ads.

It doesn’t stop there—just like our integration with the Assistant on Google Home, Google Play Music will work with Bixby, Samsung’s new intelligent interface, when it launches later this spring. Subscribers will be able to ask Bixby to play their favorite song or music for dancing and it’ll start playing on Google Play Music instantly.

We’re thrilled to bring this special version of Google Play Music to Samsung customers anywhere, and we look forward to bringing the best music experience to your Samsung device. Together, we’re committed to delivering the perfect soundtrack to make your everyday moments better.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/jhePAIG8ncI/

Internet Citizens: Let’s make a better web

Category: Google | Apr 21, 2017

The internet is a place where anyone can have a voice, be part of a community and generate positive social change. But the internet isn’t always positive or welcoming for everyone.

Nearly all of us will have come across comments or content online that shocked or even offended us, sometimes leaving us feeling isolated or powerless to change the conversation. For young people in particular, this sense of vulnerability can be heightened especially when something is shared on social media by a trusted friend.

That’s why we’re launching Internet Citizens, a series of day-long workshops for 13-18 year olds in cities across the U.K., as part of our global YouTube Creators for Change program, which supports creators who are tackling social issues and promoting awareness, tolerance and empathy on their YouTube channels. The workshops will help young people find a positive sense of belonging online and teach skills on how to participate safely and responsibly, and use tools such as flagging and comment moderation to make the web better for all. Some of the specific topics include what could be done in response to offensive speech, fake news, echo chambers and how they could use video to bring diverse groups together.

Our curriculum was designed by experts from the Institute for Strategic Dialogue, in partnership with UK Youth and Livity, and was also informed by our work with an advisory council including Faith Associates, Active Change Foundation, the MET Police, Demos and the Diana Award. Hosting these workshops are Alain “Fusion” Clapham and Efe Ezekiel, along with YouTube creator Nadir Nahdi, Founder of BENI, all of whom have mastered the art of using their voice and creativity to drive social change.

We’ve spent the last few weeks testing the workshop before our launch today in Liverpool, and have seen some promising results. With the help of UK Youth, we’ll visit youth clubs across the country over the coming months, and we’ll also explore ways to work further with youth workers and other partners to scale the program.

This is just one part of our commitment to a better web. Alongside this, we’re exploring more innovative ways to use technology and to partner with experts to help us tackle hate speech online. We’ll share more updates on these areas in the coming weeks.

And Fusion said it best: The internet is what we want it to be. It can be an unpleasant place where people misunderstand and deliberately deceive each other. Or it can be this amazing place where we can share, collaborate, understand and help each other.

To find out more about Internet Citizens, please visit our website.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/UJU_0YRmxGE/

Internet Citizens: Let’s make a better web

Category: Google | Apr 21, 2017

The internet is a place where anyone can have a voice, be part of a community and generate positive social change. But the internet isn’t always positive or welcoming for everyone.

Nearly all of us will have come across comments or content online that shocked or even offended us, sometimes leaving us feeling isolated or powerless to change the conversation. For young people in particular, this sense of vulnerability can be heightened especially when something is shared on social media by a trusted friend.

That’s why we’re launching Internet Citizens, a series of day-long workshops for 13-18 year olds in cities across the U.K., as part of our global YouTube Creators for Change program, which supports creators who are tackling social issues and promoting awareness, tolerance and empathy on their YouTube channels. The workshops will help young people find a positive sense of belonging online and teach skills on how to participate safely and responsibly, and use tools such as flagging and comment moderation to make the web better for all. Some of the specific topics include what could be done in response to offensive speech, fake news, echo chambers and how they could use video to bring diverse groups together.

Our curriculum was designed by experts from the Institute for Strategic Dialogue, in partnership with UK Youth and Livity, and was also informed by our work with an advisory council including Faith Associates, Active Change Foundation, the MET Police, Demos and the Diana Award. Hosting these workshops are Alain “Fusion” Clapham and Efe Ezekiel, along with YouTube creator Nadir Nahdi, Founder of BENI, all of whom have mastered the art of using their voice and creativity to drive social change.

We’ve spent the last few weeks testing the workshop before our launch today in Liverpool, and have seen some promising results. With the help of UK Youth, we’ll visit youth clubs across the country over the coming months, and we’ll also explore ways to work further with youth workers and other partners to scale the program.

This is just one part of our commitment to a better web. Alongside this, we’re exploring more innovative ways to use technology and to partner with experts to help us tackle hate speech online. We’ll share more updates on these areas in the coming weeks.

And Fusion said it best: The internet is what we want it to be. It can be an unpleasant place where people misunderstand and deliberately deceive each other. Or it can be this amazing place where we can share, collaborate, understand and help each other.

To find out more about Internet Citizens, please visit our website.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/MFW_t2Y3mZM/

An international framework for digital evidence

Category: Google | Apr 20, 2017

Today, we’re releasing the latest version of our Transparency Report regarding government requests for user data. In the second half of 2016, we received over 45,000 government requests for user data worldwide. This is the most government requests we’ve received for user data in a six-month period since we released our first transparency report in 2010.

In many ways, this shouldn’t be surprising. As more people use more of our services, and as we offer new ones, it is natural that we are seeing an increase in government requests. For example, Gmail had around 425 million active users in 2012, and more than 1 billion by 2016. And as digital evidence increasingly becomes part of criminal investigations, other companies are seeing similar trends. We of course continue to require appropriate legal process for these requests, resist overbroad requests not narrowly calibrated to legitimate law enforcement requirements, and reform modernization of data surveillance laws.  

Cross-border requests for data continue to account for a substantial portion of overall requests, with over 31,000 in the second half of 2016 coming from outside of the United States.. This volume underscores the need for an improved international framework that meets legitimate law enforcement needs and ensures high standards of due process, privacy and human rights. The Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty (MLAT) process facilitates the production of digital evidence in cross-border investigations (when the crime occurs in one country but data is held by a company in another country). But the MLAT process is often slow and cumbersome: on average, it takes 10 months to process an MLAT request in the United States. That’s a long time for an investigator to wait.

Without better and faster ways to collect cross-border evidence, countries will be tempted to take unilateral actions to deal with a fundamentally multilateral problem. A sustainable framework for handling digital evidence in legitimate cross-border investigations will help avoid a chaotic, conflicting patchwork of data location proposals and ad hoc surveillance measures that may threaten privacy and generate uncertainty, without fundamentally advancing legitimate law enforcement and national security interests.

We believe that governments can develop solutions that appropriately balance the various interests at stake. This includes respecting the legitimate privacy rights of users, wherever they are, as well as the obligations of governments to investigate crimes and protect their residents. The conversation should include a broad group of stakeholders, including not just law enforcement and national security perspectives, but also the voices of citizens, civil society groups and providers of information services that cross national borders.

This discussion will raise difficult questions about the scope of government surveillance powers, the extent of digital jurisdiction, the importance of rapid investigations, and privacy rights in the Internet age—fundamental issues that can’t be adequately addressed by courts using antiquated legal standards or by governments acting in an ad hoc fashion.

We look forward to sharing more thoughts about the legal frameworks that can address some of these challenges in the coming weeks and months. And we look forward to working with relevant stakeholders to craft viable and lasting solutions.  

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/e4k9ILF2pRE/

An international framework for digital evidence

Category: Google | Apr 20, 2017

Today, we’re releasing the latest version of our Transparency Report regarding government requests for user data. In the second half of 2016, we received over 45,000 government requests for user data worldwide. This is the most government requests we’ve received for user data in a six-month period since we released our first transparency report in 2010.

In many ways, this shouldn’t be surprising. As more people use more of our services, and as we offer new ones, it is natural that we are seeing an increase in government requests. For example, Gmail had around 425 million active users in 2012, and more than 1 billion by 2016. And as digital evidence increasingly becomes part of criminal investigations, other companies are seeing similar trends. We of course continue to require appropriate legal process for these requests, resist overbroad requests not narrowly calibrated to legitimate law enforcement requirements, and reform modernization of data surveillance laws.  

Cross-border requests for data continue to account for a substantial portion of overall requests, with over 31,000 in the second half of 2016 coming from outside of the United States.. This volume underscores the need for an improved international framework that meets legitimate law enforcement needs and ensures high standards of due process, privacy and human rights. The Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty (MLAT) process facilitates the production of digital evidence in cross-border investigations (when the crime occurs in one country but data is held by a company in another country). But the MLAT process is often slow and cumbersome: on average, it takes 10 months to process an MLAT request in the United States. That’s a long time for an investigator to wait.

Without better and faster ways to collect cross-border evidence, countries will be tempted to take unilateral actions to deal with a fundamentally multilateral problem. A sustainable framework for handling digital evidence in legitimate cross-border investigations will help avoid a chaotic, conflicting patchwork of data location proposals and ad hoc surveillance measures that may threaten privacy and generate uncertainty, without fundamentally advancing legitimate law enforcement and national security interests.

We believe that governments can develop solutions that appropriately balance the various interests at stake. This includes respecting the legitimate privacy rights of users, wherever they are, as well as the obligations of governments to investigate crimes and protect their residents. The conversation should include a broad group of stakeholders, including not just law enforcement and national security perspectives, but also the voices of citizens, civil society groups and providers of information services that cross national borders.

This discussion will raise difficult questions about the scope of government surveillance powers, the extent of digital jurisdiction, the importance of rapid investigations, and privacy rights in the Internet age—fundamental issues that can’t be adequately addressed by courts using antiquated legal standards or by governments acting in an ad hoc fashion.

We look forward to sharing more thoughts about the legal frameworks that can address some of these challenges in the coming weeks and months. And we look forward to working with relevant stakeholders to craft viable and lasting solutions.  

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/sxGvYlqbJiM/

The Ghent Altarpiece: how we digitized one of the most influential artworks of all time

Category: Google | Apr 20, 2017

Some 600 years ago, the Van Eyck brothers created one of the first large-scale oil paintings: “Adoration of the Mystic Lamb.” Due to its pioneering attention to detail and realistic portrayal of people, the “Ghent Altarpiece” is renowned as one of the most influential paintings ever made and a defining artwork that represents the start of the Northern Renaissance.

ghent altarpiece (inside).gif

As such an important symbol in art history, the altarpiece has long been highly sought after and widely coveted. Since 1432, when it was first installed at Saint Bavo Cathedral in what’s now Belgium, the Altarpiece has survived 13 crimes. Looted, burned and torn apart, it’s been through the hands of multiple armies, including those of Napoleon and the Nazis.

After World War II, the Monuments Men—a group set up by the Allied armies to protect cultural heritage from the Nazis—brought it back to its original home in Ghent, Belgium. One of the panels—“The Just Judges”—is still missing following its theft in 1934. Its absence remains one of the most intriguing riddles in art history.

output_sM4QuS (1).gif

Archives documenting the Altarpiece’s rescue at the end of WWII from the collection of Lukas – Art in Flanders.

Now, the freshly renovated exterior panels of the Altarpiece can be explored in ultra-high resolution on Google Arts & Culture. Thanks to a partnership with the online image library of Flemish art heritage Lukas – Art in Flanders and the Cathedral of Saint-Bavo, we’ve digitized this masterpiece for future generations to explore in unprecedented detail.

Mystic Lamb Altarpiece

Our robotic Art Camera took about 4,000 high-resolution close-ups of the artwork and used those to create the highest ever resolution image ever made of the panels. You can zoom as much as you’d like into more than 8 billion pixels.

20160926_google_078.JPG

Art Camera digitizing one of the 10 exterior panels of the Altarpiece

Discover amazing details, revealed by the panels’ recent renovation: for example, a charming view of medieval Ghent which used to be barely visible. Now you can even make out the lines of the book Mary is reading.

Altarpiece_detail.png

This is one of the latest efforts by Google Arts & Culture to provide institutions with the tools to digitally preserve their collections and make cultural heritage more accessible to everyone.

Explore the adventurous past and rescue of the Altarpiece today—and download Google Art & Culture app on iOS or Android for a daily dose of culture.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/zY0_eBMizaM/

The Ghent Altarpiece: how we digitized one of the most influential artworks of all time

Category: Google | Apr 20, 2017

Some 600 years ago, the Van Eyck brothers created one of the first large-scale oil paintings: “Adoration of the Mystic Lamb.” Due to its pioneering attention to detail and realistic portrayal of people, the “Ghent Altarpiece” is renowned as one of the most influential paintings ever made and a defining artwork that represents the start of the Northern Renaissance.

ghent altarpiece (inside).gif

As such an important symbol in art history, the altarpiece has long been highly sought after and widely coveted. Since 1432, when it was first installed at Saint Bavo Cathedral in what’s now Belgium, the Altarpiece has survived 13 crimes. Looted, burned and torn apart, it’s been through the hands of multiple armies, including those of Napoleon and the Nazis.

After World War II, the Monuments Men—a group set up by the Allied armies to protect cultural heritage from the Nazis—brought it back to its original home in Ghent, Belgium. One of the panels—“The Just Judges”—is still missing following its theft in 1934. Its absence remains one of the most intriguing riddles in art history.

output_sM4QuS (1).gif

Archives documenting the Altarpiece’s rescue at the end of WWII from the collection of Lukas – Art in Flanders.

Now, the freshly renovated exterior panels of the Altarpiece can be explored in ultra-high resolution on Google Arts & Culture. Thanks to a partnership with the online image library of Flemish art heritage Lukas – Art in Flanders and the Cathedral of Saint-Bavo, we’ve digitized this masterpiece for future generations to explore in unprecedented detail.

Mystic Lamb Altarpiece

Our robotic Art Camera took about 4,000 high-resolution close-ups of the artwork and used those to create the highest ever resolution image ever made of the panels. You can zoom as much as you’d like into more than 8 billion pixels.

20160926_google_078.JPG

Art Camera digitizing one of the 10 exterior panels of the Altarpiece

Discover amazing details, revealed by the panels’ recent renovation: for example, a charming view of medieval Ghent which used to be barely visible. Now you can even make out the lines of the book Mary is reading.

Altarpiece_detail.png

This is one of the latest efforts by Google Arts & Culture to provide institutions with the tools to digitally preserve their collections and make cultural heritage more accessible to everyone.

Explore the adventurous past and rescue of the Altarpiece today—and download Google Art & Culture app on iOS or Android for a daily dose of culture.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/gTIZ-V9UfvU/

Tomato, tomahto. Google Home now supports multiple users

Category: Google | Apr 20, 2017

“Ok Google, good morning.”

“Hey, Jana. The time is 8 AM. The weather in Mountain View currently is 72 degrees and sunny with a high of 75 degrees. Today at 9 AM you have breakfast check in with Diego. Here’s the latest news….”

Wait—that daily briefing was for my wife, who set up Google Home for the family. What if I want to hear results that are right for me?

Starting today, I can—and so can you. We’re adding the ability for up to six people to connect their account to one Google Home. So now when I ask my Google Assistant for help, it can distinguish my voice from my wife’s and I can hear my own personal playlists, my own commute time, my own schedule and more.

Google Home now supports multiple users

To get started, first make sure that you have the latest Google Home app. Then, look for a card that says ”multi-user is available” when you open the app. If you don’t see a card, click on the icon in the top right to see all of your connected devices. Once you see your Google Home in the list, select “Link your account.” From there, you’ll teach your Assistant to understand it’s you, not your partner, family member or roommate—and vice versa, based on who’s speaking. For certain features, like personalized music and commute, you’ll also need to set up your preferences within the app.

multi-user

So how does it work? When you connect your account on a Google Home, we ask you to say the phrases “Ok Google” and “Hey Google” two times each. Those phrases are then analyzed by a neural network, which can detect certain characteristics of a person’s voice. From that point on, any time you say “Ok Google” or “Hey Google” to your Google Home, the neural network will compare the sound of your voice to its previous analysis so it can understand if it’s you speaking or not. This comparison takes place only on your device, in a matter of milliseconds.

This feature will start rolling out today for Google Home users in the U.S., but will expand to the U.K. in the coming months.

Your Assistant should be personal to you—and now it is. From music to news, your Google Assistant on Google Home is ready to answer your questions and help you get more done

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/BKLh0YEvLmg/

Mobility best practice in connected workspaces: tiered access at Google

Category: Google | Apr 20, 2017

How does Google manage its own devices? With a huge range of devices on multiple platforms used by over 61,000 employees, it’s no small feat.

Google’s Technical Infrastructure organization is tasked with protecting employees against sophisticated adversaries, while ensuring that corporate security practices do not interfere with Google’s culture of innovation, freedom and flexibility. It accomplishes this with a tiered access security model that categorizes corporate services and devices into trust tiers to determine access.  

Today, we are sharing details about our tiered access approach so that IT admins can use it to deploy devices in their organizations.

In contrast to traditional security models, tiered access looks at a wide range of variables to make granular decisions regarding access. These variables go beyond simple user authentications—for example, device state, group permissions and required level of trust for a particular employee role are all taken into account.

First, internal services are associated with a trust tier according to the sensitivity of the data. A service can have one minimum trust tier or a more granular model of access where components and/or capabilities (e.g. read or write access) have different minimum trust tiers based on risk.

How Google Uses Tiered Access to Secure Devices

Second, as resource requests are made from devices, user credentials are verified and the state of the device is queried to assess its risk profile. On successful user verification, access to services is granted only if the assessed risk profile of the device matches the required trust tier.

When implementing tiered access, there are three main components to consider:

  • Client base and data sources: what is the composition of your organization’s fleet of devices and what data do you have about them?

  • Access intelligence and gateways: what technology can you use to evaluate a set of policies and make access decisions? How close to when some attempts to access information can these decisions be made?

  • Services to be accessed: what services need access controls and how will you classify the sensitivity of those services?

For Google, tiered access is a powerful tool that goes hand in hand with a larger project called BeyondCorp, which challenges the traditional security assumptions that private or “internal” IP addresses represented a “more trusted” device than those coming from the internet, and is now available as a GCP service called Identity-Aware Proxy (IAP).

To learn more about taking a similarly dynamic, flexible approach to security when planning device deployments, check out the second edition in Google Cloud’s best practice series, which shares recommendations for IT decision-makers deploying Android and Chrome devices.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/IJr-hsUXvws/