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Santa Tracker: ready for take-off

Category: Google | Dec 24, 2016

For the last 23 days the residents of the North Pole have been working day and night to help Santa Claus get ready for his big flight. And if you’ve stopped by Santa’s Village this month, you know the elves are coding, geography and dancing machines!

Now the time has come to #TrackSanta on his round-the-world mission with Donner, Cupid, Comet and Vixen (Rudolph and the other reindeer too). 

Starting today you can follow Kris Kringle around the world as he delivers presents to all the good boys and girls. Get a front-row seat to the show using AndroidGoogle Maps or Google.com. You can also stream Santa’s journey on your TV using Chromecast.

Santa Tracker on devices

Happy holidays from the Google elves at the North Pole!

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/1AnM2MaPIH8/

High-speed Wi-Fi rolls into 100th railway station in India

Category: Google | Dec 22, 2016

Jaipur train station

Jaipur station in Rajasthan was among the first stations to be connected to Railwire Wi-Fi.

“I visit [Jaipur station] every 3 to 4 days to get fast access to the Internet. I stop there for a few minutes, download apps, update them and get things my daughter wants. She is in 10th grade and uses my smartphone in the evenings to fulfill her educational needs. She also teaches my wife, her mother, to read and write using my smartphone.” 

This is the story of Bhagwan Sahay, whom our team met at Jaipur Railway station, one of the earliest stations to be connected to Railwire Wi-Fi this year. It’s one of the many stories we’ve heard from people across India who are using this Wi-Fi in many ways, big and small, that improve their daily lives. 

With Railwire Wi-Fi rolling into Udhagamandalam (Ooty) today, we’ve now brought high-speed Internet to 100 of the busiest railway stations across India. That means the 10 million people (think the entire population of Sweden) who pass through these stations every day now have access to fast enough Internet to stream (or offline) an HD video, research their destination or download a new book or game for the journey ahead. And for 15,000 people, every day, these stations connect them to the Internet for the first time.

100 stations with Railwire WiFi

We’re really excited about how far we’ve come since announcing our partnership with Indian Railways and RailTel to provide Wi-Fi at 400 railway stations across India. But what has really inspired us are the stories of how people, like Bhagwan, are using this high-speed access to the full and open Internet to make their lives a little bit better.

Somesh Singh, an engineering graduate, has been using the Wi-Fi at Hazrat Nizamuddin station in Delhi to search the web for job opportunities and prepare for interviews. The high-speed connection helps him save money and time since he doesn’t have to wait for slow-loading pages or worry about the cost of browsing. Ajay Jain, a teacher, uses the Wi-Fi to get schoolwork done on his daily commute from Indore to Ujjain, so he can spend more time with his family once he gets home. And Sandesh Awasthi, an avid cricket fan, has been having a lot more fun while waiting at Churchgate station in Mumbai, since he can now stream his favorite games to his phone in HD.

A traveler calls home

A traveler calls home while waiting for his train in Pune 

“I am migrant worker from Bihar and I travel to Rajasthan for work. Traveling usually means I won’t have a good connection. I got so excited when I saw free Wi-Fi here at the station. I just called my wife, and the voice and picture clarity were so good. I haven’t seen her face this clear in so long, whenever I talk the image is blurred because the network isn’t great. She also got so excited to see my call, she was very surprised to see me. I feel so good after speaking to her. I can’t stop smiling.” Bholu

Churchgate station in Mumbai

A look inside Churchgate station, one of Mumbai’s busiest, which came online in August. 

A traveler checks the latest timetables

A traveler checks train timetables online

Family waiting at Jaipur station

A young boy keeps himself entertained using the station Wi-Fi while his family waits for their train in Jaipur. 

The team at Ooty station today

Our team at Udhagamandalam (Ooty) station today. Ooty is also the terminus station of Nilgiri Mountain Railway, a beautiful UNESCO World Heritage Site. 

What’s next? In September we announced Google Station, which gives partners an easy set of tools to roll-out Wi-Fi hotspots in public places. With all the possibilities that our partnership with Indian Railways and RailTel have created for 10 million Indians passing through 100 stations every day, we look forward to the many more opportunities that Google Station will open up to every Indian and the stories we hope to hear from them.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/09bJXbr3j04/

High-speed Wi-Fi rolls into 100th railway station in India

Category: Google | Dec 22, 2016

Jaipur train station

Jaipur station in Rajasthan was among the first stations to be connected to Railwire Wi-Fi.

“I visit [Jaipur station] every 3 to 4 days to get fast access to the Internet. I stop there for a few minutes, download apps, update them and get things my daughter wants. She is in 10th grade and uses my smartphone in the evenings to fulfill her educational needs. She also teaches my wife, her mother, to read and write using my smartphone.” 

This is the story of Bhagwan Sahay, whom our team met at Jaipur Railway station, one of the earliest stations to be connected to Railwire Wi-Fi this year. It’s one of the many stories we’ve heard from people across India who are using this Wi-Fi in many ways, big and small, that improve their daily lives. 

With Railwire Wi-Fi rolling into Udhagamandalam (Ooty) today, we’ve now brought high-speed Internet to 100 of the busiest railway stations across India. That means the 10 million people (think the entire population of Sweden) who pass through these stations every day now have access to fast enough Internet to stream (or offline) an HD video, research their destination or download a new book or game for the journey ahead. And for 15,000 people, every day, these stations connect them to the Internet for the first time.

100 stations with Railwire WiFi

We’re really excited about how far we’ve come since announcing our partnership with Indian Railways and RailTel to provide Wi-Fi at 400 railway stations across India. But what has really inspired us are the stories of how people, like Bhagwan, are using this high-speed access to the full and open Internet to make their lives a little bit better.

Somesh Singh, an engineering graduate, has been using the Wi-Fi at Hazrat Nizamuddin station in Delhi to search the web for job opportunities and prepare for interviews. The high-speed connection helps him save money and time since he doesn’t have to wait for slow-loading pages or worry about the cost of browsing. Ajay Jain, a teacher, uses the Wi-Fi to get schoolwork done on his daily commute from Indore to Ujjain, so he can spend more time with his family once he gets home. And Sandesh Awasthi, an avid cricket fan, has been having a lot more fun while waiting at Churchgate station in Mumbai, since he can now stream his favorite games to his phone in HD.

A traveler calls home

A traveler calls home while waiting for his train in Pune 

“I am migrant worker from Bihar and I travel to Rajasthan for work. Traveling usually means I won’t have a good connection. I got so excited when I saw free Wi-Fi here at the station. I just called my wife, and the voice and picture clarity were so good. I haven’t seen her face this clear in so long, whenever I talk the image is blurred because the network isn’t great. She also got so excited to see my call, she was very surprised to see me. I feel so good after speaking to her. I can’t stop smiling.” Bholu

Churchgate station in Mumbai

A look inside Churchgate station, one of Mumbai’s busiest, which came online in August. 

A traveler checks the latest timetables

A traveler checks train timetables online

Family waiting at Jaipur station

A young boy keeps himself entertained using the station Wi-Fi while his family waits for their train in Jaipur. 

The team at Ooty station today

Our team at Udhagamandalam (Ooty) station today. Ooty is also the terminus station of Nilgiri Mountain Railway, a beautiful UNESCO World Heritage Site. 

What’s next? In September we announced Google Station, which gives partners an easy set of tools to roll-out Wi-Fi hotspots in public places. With all the possibilities that our partnership with Indian Railways and RailTel have created for 10 million Indians passing through 100 stations every day, we look forward to the many more opportunities that Google Station will open up to every Indian and the stories we hope to hear from them.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/Zqmhh2cNibA/

Supporting nonprofits around the world this holiday season

Category: Google | Dec 20, 2016

From remote villages in India, to schools across the U.S., to refugee and migrant camps in Africa, technology can help people start a business, further their education, or access new — and sometimes vital — information.

Google.org supports hundreds of nonprofits globally who are working to open up opportunities for the most vulnerable populations. As part of this ongoing work, this holiday season we’re donating $30 million in grant funding to nonprofits to bring phones, tablets, hardware and training to communities that can benefit from them most. This holiday giving brings our total grant funding for nonprofits this year to more than $100 million.

HolidayNonProfit_1_450px.jpg

Students in Tim Jones’ classroom in East Palo Alto during class time

In the U.S., Google.org is supporting classrooms in need by funding projects that have requested Chromebooks and other technology via the educational giving platform DonorsChoose.org. For example, Mr. Jones, a teacher at Ronald McNair Academy in East Palo Alto, CA, where many students come from high-poverty communities, requested devices to help his students learn both inside and outside of the classroom. Our $5 million grant to DonorsChoose.org will provide more than 150,000 K-12 students across the United States — from Bunche Middle School in Atlanta, GA to Timberland Charter Academy in Muskegon, MI — with critical learning resources.

We’re also supporting nonprofits whose programs ensure that everyone has a chance to participate equally in society — from people experiencing homelessness to individuals disconnected from pathways out of poverty. In the Bay Area, Abode Services will help more than 1,200 re-housed homeless people receive laptop computers and related training as they move into their new homes in order to provide access to employment, social services and transportation information.

HolidayNonProfit_2_800px.jpg

Young adults completing applications during LeadersUp hiring event in South LA

Across the nation, LeadersUp will increase access to opportunities for unemployed young adults to connect to careers that lead to family-sustaining wages 350 percent above the poverty line. By providing funding for thousands of devices to assist people being served by organizations like Defy Ventures and LifeMoves, we’re ensuring that more people have a fair shot at opportunity.

HolidayNonProfit_3_800px.jpg

Defy Entrepreneur-in-Training Rudo C. and volunteer David R. at Business Pitch Competition in New York City

HolidayNonProfit_4_450px.jpg

Students of Mazahua  indigenous group explore learning materials on a tablet at an UNETE-supported school in San Felipe del Progreso, State of Mexico.

In Latin America, we’re supporting UNETE to bring computers, tablets and charging stations to classrooms across Mexico — giving students access to new curriculum materials, videos, and learning games. UNETE is committed to helping teachers be successful, and we’ll pair funding for this technology with training and support services. And in India, our grant to Pratham Education Foundation will help them expand their work to help kids in rural communities learn. By using tablets across a range of their programs, from preschool through middle school, Pratham will be able to bring new, engaging content to kids and instructors.

HolidayNonProfit_5_800px.jpg

Children in Uttar Pradesh, India share what they’ve been learning on a Pratham-provided tablet with their family.

For millions of people who have been displaced from their homes, the ability to start or continue an education can become a lifeline. As part of our refugee relief efforts, we’ve expanded our support of Libraries Without Borders for their “Ideas Boxes” — portable multimedia centers with Internet access and their own power source. This grant will help fund 14 additional Ideas Boxes, enabling more than 90,000 refugees to access educational resources in refugee camps in Europe and Africa.

Around the world, we’re funding NetHope to distribute and deliver devices through organizations working with the most vulnerable populations, including women and girls, who often struggle most to get the resources, education and opportunities they deserve.

HolidayNonProfit_6_450px.jpg

NetHope WiFi network helps refugees connect with family and friends and seek asylum

In addition to these Google.org grants, every holiday season, we hold a “Giving Week” where our employees around the world can donate to the causes and organizations they want to support, and Google matches all donations. This year’s Giving Week was our biggest yet. More than 50 offices participated, a third of the company pledged, Google matched, and the total impact will be $24 million to 750 nonprofits around the world. Causes ranged from supporting the victims and survivors of the Ghost Ship fire in Oakland, to helping vulnerable women in Mexico through VIFAC, to fighting hunger and malnutrition with Akshaya Patra in India. Other giving trends this year included causes like refugee assistance and transgender rights, and support for civil liberties and women’s health organizations.

We hope the combined $54 million in grants for technology, employee donations and Google matching will help those in need around the world this holiday season. As we look ahead to 2017, we’ll continue our work to support nonprofits and communities around the world.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/g9fh4CX9gMo/

Supporting nonprofits around the world this holiday season

Category: Google | Dec 20, 2016

From remote villages in India, to schools across the U.S., to refugee and migrant camps in Africa, technology can help people start a business, further their education, or access new — and sometimes vital — information.

Google.org supports hundreds of nonprofits globally who are working to open up opportunities for the most vulnerable populations. As part of this ongoing work, this holiday season we’re donating $30 million in grant funding to nonprofits to bring phones, tablets, hardware and training to communities that can benefit from them most. This holiday giving brings our total grant funding for nonprofits this year to more than $100 million.

HolidayNonProfit_1_450px.jpg

Students in Tim Jones’ classroom in East Palo Alto during class time

In the U.S., Google.org is supporting classrooms in need by funding projects that have requested Chromebooks and other technology via the educational giving platform DonorsChoose.org. For example, Mr. Jones, a teacher at Ronald McNair Academy in East Palo Alto, CA, where many students come from high-poverty communities, requested devices to help his students learn both inside and outside of the classroom. Our $5 million grant to DonorsChoose.org will provide more than 150,000 K-12 students across the United States — from Bunche Middle School in Atlanta, GA to Timberland Charter Academy in Muskegon, MI — with critical learning resources.

We’re also supporting nonprofits whose programs ensure that everyone has a chance to participate equally in society — from people experiencing homelessness to individuals disconnected from pathways out of poverty. In the Bay Area, Abode Services will help more than 1,200 re-housed homeless people receive laptop computers and related training as they move into their new homes in order to provide access to employment, social services and transportation information.

HolidayNonProfit_2_800px.jpg

Young adults completing applications during LeadersUp hiring event in South LA

Across the nation, LeadersUp will increase access to opportunities for unemployed young adults to connect to careers that lead to family-sustaining wages 350 percent above the poverty line. By providing funding for thousands of devices to assist people being served by organizations like Defy Ventures and LifeMoves, we’re ensuring that more people have a fair shot at opportunity.

HolidayNonProfit_3_800px.jpg

Defy Entrepreneur-in-Training Rudo C. and volunteer David R. at Business Pitch Competition in New York City

HolidayNonProfit_4_450px.jpg

Students of Mazahua  indigenous group explore learning materials on a tablet at an UNETE-supported school in San Felipe del Progreso, State of Mexico.

In Latin America, we’re supporting UNETE to bring computers, tablets and charging stations to classrooms across Mexico — giving students access to new curriculum materials, videos, and learning games. UNETE is committed to helping teachers be successful, and we’ll pair funding for this technology with training and support services. And in India, our grant to Pratham Education Foundation will help them expand their work to help kids in rural communities learn. By using tablets across a range of their programs, from preschool through middle school, Pratham will be able to bring new, engaging content to kids and instructors.

HolidayNonProfit_5_800px.jpg

Children in Uttar Pradesh, India share what they’ve been learning on a Pratham-provided tablet with their family.

For millions of people who have been displaced from their homes, the ability to start or continue an education can become a lifeline. As part of our refugee relief efforts, we’ve expanded our support of Libraries Without Borders for their “Ideas Boxes” — portable multimedia centers with Internet access and their own power source. This grant will help fund 14 additional Ideas Boxes, enabling more than 90,000 refugees to access educational resources in refugee camps in Europe and Africa.

Around the world, we’re funding NetHope to distribute and deliver devices through organizations working with the most vulnerable populations, including women and girls, who often struggle most to get the resources, education and opportunities they deserve.

HolidayNonProfit_6_450px.jpg

NetHope WiFi network helps refugees connect with family and friends and seek asylum

In addition to these Google.org grants, every holiday season, we hold a “Giving Week” where our employees around the world can donate to the causes and organizations they want to support, and Google matches all donations. This year’s Giving Week was our biggest yet. More than 50 offices participated, a third of the company pledged, Google matched, and the total impact will be $24 million to 750 nonprofits around the world. Causes ranged from supporting the victims and survivors of the Ghost Ship fire in Oakland, to helping vulnerable women in Mexico through VIFAC, to fighting hunger and malnutrition with Akshaya Patra in India. Other giving trends this year included causes like refugee assistance and transgender rights, and support for civil liberties and women’s health organizations.

We hope the combined $54 million in grants for technology, employee donations and Google matching will help those in need around the world this holiday season. As we look ahead to 2017, we’ll continue our work to support nonprofits and communities around the world.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/mqDANyCNTCY/

Reflecting on Google’s GNI Engagement

Category: Google | Dec 19, 2016

 As the year comes to a close, we’re reflecting on Google’s Global Network Initiative (GNI) assessment and some of this year’s important developments in our work to protect the free expression and privacy interests of our users.

Last week, in our continued effort to increase transparency around government demands for user data, we made available to the public the National Security Letters (NSLs) Google has received where, either through litigation or legislation, we have been freed of nondisclosure obligations. Our goal in doing so is to shed more light on the nature and scope of these requests. We’ve also supported policy efforts to ensure that the privacy interests of non-U.S. persons are addressed as U.S. policymakers consider government surveillance issues.

Earlier this month, we highlighted our efforts to comply with the right to be forgotten in Europe. For much of the last year, we’ve worked to defend the idea that each country should be able to balance freedom of expression and privacy in the way that country sees fit, and not according to another country’s interpretation. One Data Protection Authority, the French Commission Nationale de l’Informatique et des Libertés (the CNIL), ordered Google to delist French right to be forgotten removals for users everywhere. We agree with the CNIL that privacy is a fundamental right — but so, too, is the right to free expression. Any balance struck between those two rights must be accompanied by territorial limits, consistent with the basic principles of international law.

These are some examples of Google’s public policy work that illustrate our commitment to the freedom of expression and privacy rights of our users. We know that pressing global issues are best addressed in partnership with with key stakeholders — and the GNI is critical to Google’s efforts.

The GNI is at the core of our multi-stakeholder engagement on free expression and privacy issues. Google is proud to be a founding member of the GNI, an initiative that brings together ICT companies with civil society organizations, investors, and academics to define a shared approach to freedom of expression and privacy online. The GNI provides a framework for company operations, rooted in international standards; promotes accountability of ICT sector companies through independent assessment; enables multi-stakeholder policy engagement; and creates shared learning opportunities across stakeholder boundaries.

Earlier this year, GNI released the second round of assessments, and announced the board’s determination that Google is compliant with the GNI framework. The assessment is an important tool for companies, NGOs, academics, and others working together to review how companies address risks to privacy and free expression.

The assessment process includes a review of relevant internal systems, policies and procedures for implementing the GNI Principles (“the process review”), and an examination of specific cases or examples that show how the company is implementing them in practice (the “case review”).

Our cases were selected for their salience to our approach to implementing the GNI Principles, taking into consideration Google’s products and services, geographical footprint, operating environments, and human rights risk profile. In addition, to the Google-specific cases discussed in GNI’s public assessment report, we wanted to provide additional examples to illustrate the types of non-U.S. cases reviewed.

Request for user data
A request was made for Gmail user information by a federal police department. A key part of our process is making sure that the requests we receive are appropriately supported by legal process. In this case, we found that the initial request was inadequate due to failure to have a judicial stamp or signature, and we therefore pushed back, as we would not comply unless the request was judicially authorized. Once these items were obtained and, we determined that it was a valid legal request (including that it was not overbroad), we complied with the request.

Request for removal
A request for Blogger content removal was made by a regulatory agency. The requestor claimed that content was subject to removal under the country’s statute prohibiting appeals to mass riots, extremist activities, and mass actions against established order. In reviewing the request, we determined that the content did not violate our terms of service.  We then responded by requesting a copy of the decision citing specific URLs that are illegal. This would be evidence of an authoritative interpretation of the local law as applied to the content.  As there was no response from the requestor, and the content did not violate our company policies, the request was denied and we did not remove the material.

RTBF: Push for Judicial Review; Careful Development and Implementation of Rigorous Removal Process for Requests
This example describes how we responded to requests subsequent to the Google Spain v AEPD and Mario Costeja ruling, which presented risks to freedom of expression. In the Costeja case, we appealed through the court process, but were unsuccessful.  We pushed back on this ruling because we considered the requirement for Google to take down this information to be in conflict with freedom of expression. On appeal, the Court of Justice of the European Union found that people have the right to ask for information to be removed from search results that include their names if it is “inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant, or excessive.” In deciding what to remove, search engines must also have regard to the public interest, without additional guidance regarding what information constitutes “public interest.” The court also decided that search engines don’t qualify for a “journalistic exception.” We continue to fight court cases seeking to expand this requirement for takedowns globally.

We also convened the Advisory Council to Google on the Right to be Forgotten to review input from dozens of experts in meetings across Europe, as well as from thousands of submissions via the Web. The Council included Frank La Rue, the UN Special Rapporteur on the Promotion and Protection of the Right to Freedom of Opinion and Expression. The Council advised us on performing the balancing act between an individual’s right to privacy and the public’s interest in access to information.

In response to the Costeja ruling, Google established a dedicated team to develop and implement a system to remove valid RtbF requests. We evaluate each request appropriately, complying with the law, but making sure that, if there is a legal basis for the content to remain available, we will assess how that applies. To address the ruling, we assembled a team to address the new category of requests arising from the rights articulated in Costeja. Our web removals site was updated to include information about and a portal for RtbF requests. Requests are reviewed by the legal removals team; after review, the requester is notified of the determination. Since implementing this system, we have delisted approximately 780,000 URLs. Our process responds to individual requests and carefully evaluates  each request against the criteria for removal. We also notify websites when one of their pages has been removed pursuant to a RtbF claim. In addition to removing URLs, we include information about RtbF requests and removals in our Transparency Report.

Our assessors also provided us with recommendations for enhancing our implementation of the GNI Principles. These recommendations, combined with feedback and ongoing engagement with GNI stakeholders, will inform our policies and practices and strengthen our advocacy in 2017.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/XfQD2HMHc9A/

Reflecting on Google’s GNI Engagement

Category: Google | Dec 19, 2016

 As the year comes to a close, we’re reflecting on Google’s Global Network Initiative (GNI) assessment and some of this year’s important developments in our work to protect the free expression and privacy interests of our users.

Last week, in our continued effort to increase transparency around government demands for user data, we made available to the public the National Security Letters (NSLs) Google has received where, either through litigation or legislation, we have been freed of nondisclosure obligations. Our goal in doing so is to shed more light on the nature and scope of these requests. We’ve also supported policy efforts to ensure that the privacy interests of non-U.S. persons are addressed as U.S. policymakers consider government surveillance issues.

Earlier this month, we highlighted our efforts to comply with the right to be forgotten in Europe. For much of the last year, we’ve worked to defend the idea that each country should be able to balance freedom of expression and privacy in the way that country sees fit, and not according to another country’s interpretation. One Data Protection Authority, the French Commission Nationale de l’Informatique et des Libertés (the CNIL), ordered Google to delist French right to be forgotten removals for users everywhere. We agree with the CNIL that privacy is a fundamental right — but so, too, is the right to free expression. Any balance struck between those two rights must be accompanied by territorial limits, consistent with the basic principles of international law.

These are some examples of Google’s public policy work that illustrate our commitment to the freedom of expression and privacy rights of our users. We know that pressing global issues are best addressed in partnership with with key stakeholders — and the GNI is critical to Google’s efforts.

The GNI is at the core of our multi-stakeholder engagement on free expression and privacy issues. Google is proud to be a founding member of the GNI, an initiative that brings together ICT companies with civil society organizations, investors, and academics to define a shared approach to freedom of expression and privacy online. The GNI provides a framework for company operations, rooted in international standards; promotes accountability of ICT sector companies through independent assessment; enables multi-stakeholder policy engagement; and creates shared learning opportunities across stakeholder boundaries.

Earlier this year, GNI released the second round of assessments, and announced the board’s determination that Google is compliant with the GNI framework. The assessment is an important tool for companies, NGOs, academics, and others working together to review how companies address risks to privacy and free expression.

The assessment process includes a review of relevant internal systems, policies and procedures for implementing the GNI Principles (“the process review”), and an examination of specific cases or examples that show how the company is implementing them in practice (the “case review”).

Our cases were selected for their salience to our approach to implementing the GNI Principles, taking into consideration Google’s products and services, geographical footprint, operating environments, and human rights risk profile. In addition, to the Google-specific cases discussed in GNI’s public assessment report, we wanted to provide additional examples to illustrate the types of non-U.S. cases reviewed.

Request for user data
A request was made for Gmail user information by a federal police department. A key part of our process is making sure that the requests we receive are appropriately supported by legal process. In this case, we found that the initial request was inadequate due to failure to have a judicial stamp or signature, and we therefore pushed back, as we would not comply unless the request was judicially authorized. Once these items were obtained and, we determined that it was a valid legal request (including that it was not overbroad), we complied with the request.

Request for removal
A request for Blogger content removal was made by a regulatory agency. The requestor claimed that content was subject to removal under the country’s statute prohibiting appeals to mass riots, extremist activities, and mass actions against established order. In reviewing the request, we determined that the content did not violate our terms of service.  We then responded by requesting a copy of the decision citing specific URLs that are illegal. This would be evidence of an authoritative interpretation of the local law as applied to the content.  As there was no response from the requestor, and the content did not violate our company policies, the request was denied and we did not remove the material.

RTBF: Push for Judicial Review; Careful Development and Implementation of Rigorous Removal Process for Requests
This example describes how we responded to requests subsequent to the Google Spain v AEPD and Mario Costeja ruling, which presented risks to freedom of expression. In the Costeja case, we appealed through the court process, but were unsuccessful.  We pushed back on this ruling because we considered the requirement for Google to take down this information to be in conflict with freedom of expression. On appeal, the Court of Justice of the European Union found that people have the right to ask for information to be removed from search results that include their names if it is “inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant, or excessive.” In deciding what to remove, search engines must also have regard to the public interest, without additional guidance regarding what information constitutes “public interest.” The court also decided that search engines don’t qualify for a “journalistic exception.” We continue to fight court cases seeking to expand this requirement for takedowns globally.

We also convened the Advisory Council to Google on the Right to be Forgotten to review input from dozens of experts in meetings across Europe, as well as from thousands of submissions via the Web. The Council included Frank La Rue, the UN Special Rapporteur on the Promotion and Protection of the Right to Freedom of Opinion and Expression. The Council advised us on performing the balancing act between an individual’s right to privacy and the public’s interest in access to information.

In response to the Costeja ruling, Google established a dedicated team to develop and implement a system to remove valid RtbF requests. We evaluate each request appropriately, complying with the law, but making sure that, if there is a legal basis for the content to remain available, we will assess how that applies. To address the ruling, we assembled a team to address the new category of requests arising from the rights articulated in Costeja. Our web removals site was updated to include information about and a portal for RtbF requests. Requests are reviewed by the legal removals team; after review, the requester is notified of the determination. Since implementing this system, we have delisted approximately 780,000 URLs. Our process responds to individual requests and carefully evaluates  each request against the criteria for removal. We also notify websites when one of their pages has been removed pursuant to a RtbF claim. In addition to removing URLs, we include information about RtbF requests and removals in our Transparency Report.

Our assessors also provided us with recommendations for enhancing our implementation of the GNI Principles. These recommendations, combined with feedback and ongoing engagement with GNI stakeholders, will inform our policies and practices and strengthen our advocacy in 2017.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/MKzVGzcEmv8/

Celebrating women who are making an impact at Young Women’s Honors

Category: Google | Dec 19, 2016

What does it take to shift the conversation from “What if” to “I can”? When it comes to becoming a computer scientist, our research shows that girls need to see it to be it. Unfortunately, they’re about half as likely as boys to say that they often see someone like themselves doing computer science (CS) in the media. This is why we’ve teamed up with Young Women’s Honors — a global platform and the passion project of “Jane the Virgin” star Gina Rodriguez — which will host their first-ever award show tonight to honor and celebrate women who demonstrate confidence and leadership in their field.

When you see someone following their dreams, it gives you allowance to follow your own.

Gina Rodriguez

Actor

Gina Rodriguez

Of the 10 amazing women who will be celebrated tonight, Google’s Made With Code — along with YouTube star Lilly Singh and “Black-ish” star Yara Shahidi — will honor computer scientist Fereshteh Forough. After fleeing Afghanistan during the rise of the Taliban, Fereshteh followed her dreams of becoming a computer scientist. She then started Code to Inspire, a nonprofit that teaches female students in Afghanistan how to code, so that other girls from her hometown have a safe educational environment to develop their technical skills, build confidence, and challenge social norms.

Young Women Honors.png

Fereshteh’s Code to Inspire is part of the Google RISE program, which supports not-for-profit organizations around the world working to increase access to CS education. Last week, we announced another cohort of RISE that will join Code to Inspire and 200+ organizations the program has supported since 2010. This round includes organizations from 16 countries who will reach a combined 130,000 youth from backgrounds that are underrepresented in the field of computer science. In the coming year we’re excited to see what these organizations do — from girls in Argentina developing apps to solve social problems, young entrepreneurs in India building technical and leadership skills, and schools in Romania launching free coding clubs across the country.

Watch the show TONIGHT at 9/8c on YouTube and The CW to meet Fereshteh and more inspiring women like her!

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/6GtmLXuTSwo/

Celebrating women who are making an impact at Young Women’s Honors

Category: Google | Dec 19, 2016

What does it take to shift the conversation from “What if” to “I can”? When it comes to becoming a computer scientist, our research shows that girls need to see it to be it. Unfortunately, they’re about half as likely as boys to say that they often see someone like themselves doing computer science (CS) in the media. This is why we’ve teamed up with Young Women’s Honors — a global platform and the passion project of “Jane the Virgin” star Gina Rodriguez — which will host their first-ever award show tonight to honor and celebrate women who demonstrate confidence and leadership in their field.

When you see someone following their dreams, it gives you allowance to follow your own.

Gina Rodriguez

Actor

Gina Rodriguez

Of the 10 amazing women who will be celebrated tonight, Google’s Made With Code — along with YouTube star Lilly Singh and “Black-ish” star Yara Shahidi — will honor computer scientist Fereshteh Forough. After fleeing Afghanistan during the rise of the Taliban, Fereshteh followed her dreams of becoming a computer scientist. She then started Code to Inspire, a nonprofit that teaches female students in Afghanistan how to code, so that other girls from her hometown have a safe educational environment to develop their technical skills, build confidence, and challenge social norms.

Young Women Honors.png

Fereshteh’s Code to Inspire is part of the Google RISE program, which supports not-for-profit organizations around the world working to increase access to CS education. Last week, we announced another cohort of RISE that will join Code to Inspire and 200+ organizations the program has supported since 2010. This round includes organizations from 16 countries who will reach a combined 130,000 youth from backgrounds that are underrepresented in the field of computer science. In the coming year we’re excited to see what these organizations do — from girls in Argentina developing apps to solve social problems, young entrepreneurs in India building technical and leadership skills, and schools in Romania launching free coding clubs across the country.

Watch the show TONIGHT at 9/8c on YouTube and The CW to meet Fereshteh and more inspiring women like her!

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/IqW8zwvjb3A/

Mantova, Italy’s Capital of Culture 2016, on Google Arts & Culture

Category: Google | Dec 19, 2016

The City of Mantova, the Italian Capital of Culture 2016, unveils its story along with its finest cultural treasures and natural beauty on Google Arts & Culture.

With your smartphone or computer, start exploring the wonders of the Palazzo Te: admire the lively details of the frescos of the Chamber of the Giants and use Google Cardboard to step in the room and visit all the other iconic places of Mantova, immersing yourself in its heritage in 360°.

For the first time in Italy, the use of the Art Camera made it possible to bring online in ultra high resolution 50 paintings from the Palazzo’s collection including the enigmatic Portrait of Giulio Romano by Titian.

You will be amazed by the majestic ceiling of the Teatro Bibiena,  haunted by the spirit of Mozart who played the opening concert the 16th of January 1770. Leaf through the books of the Biblioteca Teresiana to find the verses of the Songbook for Isabella d’Este, a great Renaissance woman, or the illuminated pages of the invaluable manuscript from the library of the monastery of Saint Benedict in Polirone. Then, take a walk inside the Palazzo del Podestà, currently undergoing restoration, a work in progress that allows us to track the successive transformations and functions of the buildings.

Yet the treasures of Mantova are not limited to the inside of its palaces. The City is itself an open-air museum inviting the user for a walk to discover its magnificent sights, its story, tradition and tastes.  

With the end of the year approaching, Mantova will soon pass on its title of Italian Capital of Culture to another Italian city, but its timeless artworks and wonders will remain accessible to anyone online on the Google Arts & Culture platform. Visit it at g.co/mantova2016

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/I_jXhedSDXc/