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Four signs you’re wasting time at work and how G Suite can help

Category: Google | Jun 12, 2017

We all waste time at work, whether it’s on purpose (brushing up on Wonder Woman’s history) or on accident (really should have budgeted more time for internal reviews). Luckily, G Suite can help you accomplish more at work, quicker. Here are four tell-tale signs you’re spending time on the wrong things, and tips on how to avoid these time-sinks.

1. You’ve spent more time emailing co-workers than you have actually working 

The average worker spends an estimated 13 hours per week writing emails—nearly two full work days. Luckily, you can cut back on time spent replying to emails with Smart Reply in Gmail. Smart Reply uses machine learning to generate quick, natural language responses for you.

2. You’ve spent the past hour formatting slides for a presentation

Is an image centered? Should you use “Times New Roman” or “Calibri?” Formatting presentations monopolizes too much of our time and takes away from what’s really valuable: sharing insights.

But you can save time polishing your presentations by using Explore in Slides, powered by machine learning. Explore generates design suggestions for your presentation so you don’t have to worry about cropping, resizing or reformatting. You can also use Explore in Docs, which makes it easy to research right within your documents. Explore will recommend related topics to help you learn more or even suggest photos or more content you can add to your document. Check out how to use Explore in Slides and Docs in this episode of the G Suite Show:

Explore feature for Docs and Slides | The G Suite Show

3. You can’t find a file you know you saved in your drive

Where is that pesky file? According to a McKinsey report, employees spend almost two hours every day searching and gathering information. That’s a lot of time.

Curb time wasted with Quick Access in Drive, which uses machine intelligence to predict and suggest files you need when you need them. Natural Language Processing (NLP) also makes it possible for you to search the way you speak. Say you’re trying to find an important file from 2016. Simply search “spreadsheets I created in 2016” and voilà! 

Another way to avoid losing files is by using Team Drives, a central location in Drive that houses shared files. In Team Drives, all team members can access files (or manage individual share permissions), so you don’t have to worry about tracking down a file after someone leaves or granting access to every doc that you create.

4. You’ve fussed with a spreadsheet formula over and over again

According to internal Google data, less than 30 percent of enterprise users feel comfortable manipulating formulas within spreadsheets. “=SUM(A1, B1)” or “=SUM(1, 2)” is easy, but more sophisticated calculations can be challenging.

Bypass remembering formulas and time-consuming analysis and dive straight into finding insights with Explore in Sheets, which uses machine learning to crunch numbers for you. Type in questions (in words, not formulas) in Explore in Sheets on the web to learn more about your data instantly. And now, you can use the same powerful technology to create charts for you within Sheets. Instead of manually building graphs, ask Explore to do it for you by typing the request in words.

GIF

Stop wasting time on menial tasks and focus more on important, strategic work. To learn more about other G Suite apps that can help you save time, visit https://gsuite.google.com/.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/f1rI9TghQ5Y/

Four signs you’re wasting time at work and how G Suite can help

Category: Google | Jun 12, 2017

We all waste time at work, whether it’s on purpose (brushing up on Wonder Woman’s history) or on accident (really should have budgeted more time for internal reviews). Luckily, G Suite can help you accomplish more at work, quicker. Here are four tell-tale signs you’re spending time on the wrong things, and tips on how to avoid these time-sinks.

1. You’ve spent more time emailing co-workers than you have actually working 

The average worker spends an estimated 13 hours per week writing emails—nearly two full work days. Luckily, you can cut back on time spent replying to emails with Smart Reply in Gmail. Smart Reply uses machine learning to generate quick, natural language responses for you.

2. You’ve spent the past hour formatting slides for a presentation

Is an image centered? Should you use “Times New Roman” or “Calibri?” Formatting presentations monopolizes too much of our time and takes away from what’s really valuable: sharing insights.

But you can save time polishing your presentations by using Explore in Slides, powered by machine learning. Explore generates design suggestions for your presentation so you don’t have to worry about cropping, resizing or reformatting. You can also use Explore in Docs, which makes it easy to research right within your documents. Explore will recommend related topics to help you learn more or even suggest photos or more content you can add to your document. Check out how to use Explore in Slides and Docs in this episode of the G Suite Show:

Explore feature for Docs and Slides | The G Suite Show

3. You can’t find a file you know you saved in your drive

Where is that pesky file? According to a McKinsey report, employees spend almost two hours every day searching and gathering information. That’s a lot of time.

Curb time wasted with Quick Access in Drive, which uses machine intelligence to predict and suggest files you need when you need them. Natural Language Processing (NLP) also makes it possible for you to search the way you speak. Say you’re trying to find an important file from 2016. Simply search “spreadsheets I created in 2016” and voilà! 

Another way to avoid losing files is by using Team Drives, a central location in Drive that houses shared files. In Team Drives, all team members can access files (or manage individual share permissions), so you don’t have to worry about tracking down a file after someone leaves or granting access to every doc that you create.

4. You’ve fussed with a spreadsheet formula over and over again

According to internal Google data, less than 30 percent of enterprise users feel comfortable manipulating formulas within spreadsheets. “=SUM(a+b)” is easy, but more sophisticated calculations can be challenging.

Bypass remembering formulas and time-consuming analysis and dive straight into finding insights with Explore in Sheets, which uses machine learning to crunch numbers for you. Type in questions (in words, not formulas) in Explore in Sheets on web, Android or iOS to learn more about your data instantly. And now, you can use the same powerful technology to create charts for you within Sheets. Instead of manually building graphs, ask Explore to do it for you by typing the request in words.

GIF

Stop wasting time on menial tasks and focus more on important, strategic work. To learn more about other G Suite apps that can help you save time, visit https://gsuite.google.com/.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/loDMQZxuy88/

Using machine learning to help people make smart decisions about solar energy

Category: Google | Jun 12, 2017

 A few years ago, when my family was first deciding whether or not to go solar, I remember driving around the neighborhood, looking at all the solar arrays on nearby rooftops. It made me realize: Wow, solar isn’t some futuristic concept, it’s already part of the fabric of my town! Seeing that others around me were already benefiting from solar helped me decide to do the same.

We want to make it easy for people to make informed decisions about whether to invest in solar. Project Sunroof already shows you solar potential and cost saving for more than 60 million individual homes. Today we’re adding a new feature, Project Sunroof Data Explorer, which shows a map of existing solar installations in neighborhoods throughout the United States. Now instead of driving street to street, it’s a little easier to see if houses around you and communities nearby have already gone solar.  

one

Click on “existing arrays” in the upper right corner to see number of existing installations in your region

This feature combines machine learning with imagery from Google Maps and Google Earth to provide an estimate of how many houses in an area have solar. We started by taking in high-resolution imagery of rooftops and manually identifying solar installations. We then used that data as the initial training set for our algorithm. After many iterations, our machine learning algorithms can now automatically find and identify installations in the imagery (both photovoltaic panels, which produce electricity, and solar hot water heaters). Even for machines, practice makes perfect!

2

So far we’ve identified around 700,000 installations in the U.S. and over time, as we continue to train the algorithms and apply improvements, we will be able to find and show more installations. We hope that this new feature will provide policy makers, communities and individuals with more information to help make smarter decisions in their transition to cleaner power sources.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/uA6J_w898Gs/

Using machine learning to help people make smart decisions about solar energy

Category: Google | Jun 12, 2017

 A few years ago, when my family was first deciding whether or not to go solar, I remember driving around the neighborhood, looking at all the solar arrays on nearby rooftops. It made me realize: Wow, solar isn’t some futuristic concept, it’s already part of the fabric of my town! Seeing that others around me were already benefiting from solar helped me decide to do the same.

We want to make it easy for people to make informed decisions about whether to invest in solar. Project Sunroof already shows you solar potential and cost saving for more than 60 million individual homes. Today we’re adding a new feature, Project Sunroof Data Explorer, which shows a map of existing solar installations in neighborhoods throughout the United States. Now instead of driving street to street, it’s a little easier to see if houses around you and communities nearby have already gone solar.  

one

Click on “existing arrays” in the upper right corner to see number of existing installations in your region

This feature combines machine learning with imagery from Google Maps and Google Earth to provide an estimate of how many houses in an area have solar. We started by taking in high-resolution imagery of rooftops and manually identifying solar installations. We then used that data as the initial training set for our algorithm. After many iterations, our machine learning algorithms can now automatically find and identify installations in the imagery (both photovoltaic panels, which produce electricity, and solar hot water heaters). Even for machines, practice makes perfect!

2

So far we’ve identified around 700,000 installations in the U.S. and over time, as we continue to train the algorithms and apply improvements, we will be able to find and show more installations. We hope that this new feature will provide policy makers, communities and individuals with more information to help make smarter decisions in their transition to cleaner power sources.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/dxAEkYvB460/

Using machine learning to help people make smart decisions about solar energy

Category: Google | Jun 12, 2017

 A few years ago, when my family was first deciding whether or not to go solar, I remember driving around the neighborhood, looking at all the solar arrays on nearby rooftops. It made me realize: Wow, solar isn’t some futuristic concept, it’s already part of the fabric of my town! Seeing that others around me were already benefiting from solar helped me decide to do the same.

We want to make it easy for people to make informed decisions about whether to invest in solar. Project Sunroof already shows you solar potential and cost saving for more than 60 million individual homes. Today we’re adding a new feature, Project Sunroof Data Explorer, which shows a map of existing solar installations in neighborhoods throughout the United States. Now instead of driving street to street, it’s a little easier to see if houses around you and communities nearby have already gone solar.  

one

Click on “existing arrays” in the upper right corner to see number of existing installations in your region

This feature combines machine learning with imagery from Google Maps and Google Earth to provide an estimate of how many houses in an area have solar. We started by taking in high-resolution imagery of rooftops and manually identifying solar installations. We then used that data as the initial training set for our algorithm. After many iterations, our machine learning algorithms can now automatically find and identify installations in the imagery (both photovoltaic panels, which produce electricity, and solar hot water heaters). Even for machines, practice makes perfect!

2

So far we’ve identified around 700,000 installations in the U.S. and over time, as we continue to train the algorithms and apply improvements, we will be able to find and show more installations. We hope that this new feature will provide policy makers, communities and individuals with more information to help make smarter decisions in their transition to cleaner power sources.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/8H4_CKjF3yQ/

The High Five: Courtside seats for Comey

Category: Google | Jun 9, 2017

Cavs vs. Warriors. Cookies vs. oranges. And Madrid vs. manspreaders. Here’s a look at some of the top trending searches from the week of June 2. 

Nothin’ but net

… on Google this week, as people search for details about the NBA Finals. This year marks a third consecutive matchup between the Cavaliers and the Warriors—a first for any two teams in the NBA. Searchers wanted to know who won games 2 and 3, as well as what channel and time the next game was on. Though the Warriors have won every game in the series so far, LeBron James has consistently been at the top of the search pack this week, followed alternately by Steph Curry and Kevin Durant. Finally, if you need a little Basketball 101, you’re not alone: Searchers also asked, “How many games to win the NBA finals?” Four out of seven—and Game 4 tips off tonight.

Comey Day

The Warriors may be up 3-0, but when it came to must-see TV they had some competition from an unexpected corner this week. Former FBI Director James Comey testified in front of the Senate Intelligence Committee yesterday about the investigation into Russian interference in the presidential election, and people were dialed-in. During his testimony, search interest in “Comey live” spiked 200 percent higher than “NBA finals live” at any other point this month in the U.S. Many wanted to know why Comey was fired, as well as “Who is on the Senate Intelligence Committee?” and “Who is questioning Comey right now?” While Comey was answering questions under oath, others were keeping an eye on the President’s reaction, asking “Is Trump live tweeting now?” But the top question about Comey yesterday wasn’t political. It was “How tall is James Comey?” Answer: Taller than Steph Curry, as tall as LeBron James.

An a-peeling parody

“Orange is the New Black” debuts its fifth season today, but this week was all about Piper Snackman. Inspired by the Netflix series, Sesame Street released a creative skit to teach kids about the benefits of healthy eating. In addition to Piper, “Orange is the New Snack” features adorable muppet versions of Red, Morello and the rest of the OITNB crew—including, inevitably, “Googley eyes.” Most searchers were simply looking for the video to watch the parody (with variations on “Sesame Street is the new snack” and “Sesame Street does Orange is the New Black”), but Sesame Street should be hopeful that some folks took the message to heart. Search interest in “orange snacks” spiked more than 900 percent this week.

High Five - Orange is the New Snack

Stop the spread

This week, Madrid became the most recent city to take a stand on “manspreading” on public transportation. The city’s transit agency will be posting signs on all their buses to remind passengers that taking up more than one seat via their posture is considered bad public transportation behavior. In the U.S., where the NYC subway has had similar signs for three years, people turned to Google to ask “Why is manspreading an issue?” and “is manspreading sexist?” as well as as how to fight it (apart from better signage, we assume). They also wondered, “What do you call manspreading in Spanish?” The answer, as far as we can tell: “el manspreading.” You know what they say—body language is universal.

Thank you for being a friend

People turned to to social media to celebrate their BFFs yesterday for National Best Friends Day. Many searchers were looking for memes and GIFs to share, while more sentimental types searched for “happy national best friend day quotes.” Skeptical about made-up holidays? Consider that other national days people were searching for this week include “VCR Day,” “Attitude Day” and “Chocolate Ice Cream Day.” Whatever you celebrated this week, search has your back—that’s what friends are for.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/pL7l6gC58tQ/

The High Five: Courtside seats for Comey

Category: Google | Jun 9, 2017

Cavs vs. Warriors. Cookies vs. oranges. And Madrid vs. manspreaders. Here’s a look at some of the top trending searches from the week of June 2. 

Nothin’ but net

… on Google this week, as people search for details about the NBA Finals. This year marks a third consecutive matchup between the Cavaliers and the Warriors—a first for any two teams in the NBA. Searchers wanted to know who won games 2 and 3, as well as what channel and time the next game was on. Though the Warriors have won every game in the series so far, LeBron James has consistently been at the top of the search pack this week, followed alternately by Steph Curry and Kevin Durant. Finally, if you need a little Basketball 101, you’re not alone: Searchers also asked, “How many games to win the NBA finals?” Four out of seven—and Game 4 tips off tonight.

Comey Day

The Warriors may be up 3-0, but when it came to must-see TV they had some competition from an unexpected corner this week. Former FBI Director James Comey testified in front of the Senate Intelligence Committee yesterday about the investigation into Russian interference in the presidential election, and people were dialed-in. During his testimony, search interest in “Comey live” spiked 200 percent higher than “NBA finals live” at any other point this month in the U.S. Many wanted to know why Comey was fired, as well as “Who is on the Senate Intelligence Committee?” and “Who is questioning Comey right now?” While Comey was answering questions under oath, others were keeping an eye on the President’s reaction, asking “Is Trump live tweeting now?” But the top question about Comey yesterday wasn’t political. It was “How tall is James Comey?” Answer: Taller than Steph Curry, as tall as LeBron James.

An a-peeling parody

“Orange is the New Black” debuts its fifth season today, but this week was all about Piper Snackman. Inspired by the Netflix series, Sesame Street released a creative skit to teach kids about the benefits of healthy eating. In addition to Piper, “Orange is the New Snack” features adorable muppet versions of Red, Morello and the rest of the OITNB crew—including, inevitably, “Googley eyes.” Most searchers were simply looking for the video to watch the parody (with variations on “Sesame Street is the new snack” and “Sesame Street does Orange is the New Black”), but Sesame Street should be hopeful that some folks took the message to heart. Search interest in “orange snacks” spiked more than 900 percent this week.

High Five - Orange is the New Snack

Stop the spread

This week, Madrid became the most recent city to take a stand on “manspreading” on public transportation. The city’s transit agency will be posting signs on all their buses to remind passengers that taking up more than one seat via their posture is considered bad public transportation behavior. In the U.S., where the NYC subway has had similar signs for three years, people turned to Google to ask “Why is manspreading an issue?” and “is manspreading sexist?” as well as as how to fight it (apart from better signage, we assume). They also wondered, “What do you call manspreading in Spanish?” The answer, as far as we can tell: “el manspreading.” You know what they say—body language is universal.

Thank you for being a friend

People turned to to social media to celebrate their BFFs yesterday for National Best Friends Day. Many searchers were looking for memes and GIFs to share, while more sentimental types searched for “happy national best friend day quotes.” Skeptical about made-up holidays? Consider that other national days people were searching for this week include “VCR Day,” “Attitude Day” and “Chocolate Ice Cream Day.” Whatever you celebrated this week, search has your back—that’s what friends are for.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/tvk6GUJQdkI/

The High Five: Courtside seats for Comey

Category: Google | Jun 9, 2017

Cavs vs. Warriors. Cookies vs. oranges. And Madrid vs. manspreaders. Here’s a look at some of the top trending searches from the week of June 2. 

Nothin’ but net

… on Google this week, as people search for details about the NBA Finals. This year marks a third consecutive matchup between the Cavaliers and the Warriors—a first for any two teams in the NBA. Searchers wanted to know who won games 2 and 3, as well as what channel and time the next game was on. Though the Warriors have won every game in the series so far, LeBron James has consistently been at the top of the search pack this week, followed alternately by Steph Curry and Kevin Durant. Finally, if you need a little Basketball 101, you’re not alone: Searchers also asked, “How many games to win the NBA finals?” Four out of seven—and Game 4 tips off tonight.

Comey Day

The Warriors may be up 3-0, but when it came to must-see TV they had some competition from an unexpected corner this week. Former FBI Director James Comey testified in front of the Senate Intelligence Committee yesterday about the investigation into Russian interference in the presidential election, and people were dialed-in. During his testimony, search interest in “Comey live” spiked 200 percent higher than “NBA finals live” at any other point this month in the U.S. Many wanted to know why Comey was fired, as well as “Who is on the Senate Intelligence Committee?” and “Who is questioning Comey right now?” While Comey was answering questions under oath, others were keeping an eye on the President’s reaction, asking “Is Trump live tweeting now?” But the top question about Comey yesterday wasn’t political. It was “How tall is James Comey?” Answer: Taller than Steph Curry, as tall as LeBron James.

An a-peeling parody

“Orange is the New Black” debuts its fifth season today, but this week was all about Piper Snackman. Inspired by the Netflix series, Sesame Street released a creative skit to teach kids about the benefits of healthy eating. In addition to Piper, “Orange is the New Snack” features adorable muppet versions of Red, Morello and the rest of the OITNB crew—including, inevitably, “Googley eyes.” Most searchers were simply looking for the video to watch the parody (with variations on “Sesame Street is the new snack” and “Sesame Street does Orange is the New Black”), but Sesame Street should be hopeful that some folks took the message to heart. Search interest in “orange snacks” spiked more than 900 percent this week.

High Five - Orange is the New Snack

Stop the spread

This week, Madrid became the most recent city to take a stand on “manspreading” on public transportation. The city’s transit agency will be posting signs on all their buses to remind passengers that taking up more than one seat via their posture is considered bad public transportation behavior. In the U.S., where the NYC subway has had similar signs for three years, people turned to Google to ask “Why is manspreading an issue?” and “is manspreading sexist?” as well as as how to fight it (apart from better signage, we assume). They also wondered, “What do you call manspreading in Spanish?” The answer, as far as we can tell: “el manspreading.” You know what they say—body language is universal.

Thank you for being a friend

People turned to to social media to celebrate their BFFs yesterday for National Best Friends Day. Many searchers were looking for memes and GIFs to share, while more sentimental types searched for “happy national best friend day quotes.” Skeptical about made-up holidays? Consider that other national days people were searching for this week include “VCR Day,” “Attitude Day” and “Chocolate Ice Cream Day.” Whatever you celebrated this week, search has your back—that’s what friends are for.

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/dCA1pEinvWQ/

Find Pride events on the map

Category: Google | Jun 9, 2017

People everywhere are celebrating Pride this month. To help you find your local parade and events or just navigate around the crowds, we’ve added the parade routes and event info to Google Maps on both Android and iOS in 35 cities worldwide.

Pride_1_tel aviv.png

If you’re in one of the 35 covered cities, you’ll notice a rainbow parade route on the map itself. Tap it to open an event card with more information like what kind of traffic to expect nearby, event hours, and a description of what’s happening. Pride events other than parades will be marked on the map with a special Pride icon, which will also reveal more info when tapped. For passersby who need to navigate around the parades and events, we’ve incorporated road closures and detours, and will dynamically reroute drivers around the festivities.

SF Parade.png

Whether you’re heading to a Pride parade or navigating the areas nearby, Google Maps will help get you where you’re going. Happy Pride!

Pride

*Covered Cities: Amsterdam, Barcelona, Berlin, Boston, Brooklyn, Chicago, Cologne, Dallas, Delhi, Dublin, Guadalajara, Hamburg, Houston, London, Los Angeles, Lyon, Madrid, Manchester, Mexico City, Miami, Milan, Munich, NYC, Paris, Rome, San Antonio, San Francisco, Sao Paulo, Seattle, Sydney, Tel Aviv, Toronto, Washington, DC, Zurich

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/h1wxjjJFsAU/

Find Pride events on the map

Category: Google | Jun 9, 2017

People everywhere are celebrating Pride this month. To help you find your local parade and events or just navigate around the crowds, we’ve added the parade routes and event info to Google Maps on both Android and iOS in 35 cities worldwide.

Pride_1_tel aviv.png

If you’re in one of the 35 covered cities, you’ll notice a rainbow parade route on the map itself. Tap it to open an event card with more information like what kind of traffic to expect nearby, event hours, and a description of what’s happening. Pride events other than parades will be marked on the map with a special Pride icon, which will also reveal more info when tapped. For passersby who need to navigate around the parades and events, we’ve incorporated road closures and detours, and will dynamically reroute drivers around the festivities.

SF Parade.png

Whether you’re heading to a Pride parade or navigating the areas nearby, Google Maps will help get you where you’re going. Happy Pride!

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/MKuf/~3/nmau-AUVZfg/