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The Google Maps of the Week

Category: Google Maps | Apr 1, 2012

Today’s release of the 8-bit map tiles for Google Maps has to get a special mention this week. The NES version of Google Maps is all sorts of awesome. If you haven’t seen it yet then go to Google Maps and select the ‘Quest’ button.

However there were some other brilliant maps released this week.


The UK Department for Energy and Climate Change released this real heat map for England. I say ‘real’ because it actually uses Google Maps to display heat use at building level throughout England.

The CEO – Heatmap shows heat demand from individual buildings throughout England and provides a range of tools to help developers and planners identify priority areas for low carbon heat projects.


AllTrails wasn’t released this week but it was the first time I stumbled upon it. AllTrails currently has over 200,000 members who have mapped over 45,000 trails. The trails includes routes and information on many different activities including hiking, mountain biking, skiing, and snowboarding.

It is possible to search for trails by location and the results are displayed on a Google Map. It is then possible to refine the trails shown by the driving distance from your location, the length of the trail and / or its duration.


The Yard Sale Treasure Map seemed to get a bit of buzz this week. You can use Yard Sale to find yard sales happening around your location and plan a route and an itinerary, to help you visit them all.

When you add a location to Yard Sale Treasure Map the nearest sales are automatically added to your itinerary. You can add or remove sales by clicking on their map marker. You can even search for places to stop off on your route. For example if you fancy a coffee between yard sales you can search for nearby cafes and add one to your route.


From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GoogleMapsMania/~3/djicdPERx2Q/google-maps-of-week.html

Dragon Quest with 8-Bit Google Maps

Category: Google Maps | Apr 1, 2012


OK – it had to be done.

Here’s The 8-bit Map Quest, a quest game using the new 8-bit Google Map tiles.

The game isn’t very long (I got bored). Really it is just a proof of concept and an attempt to persuade Google that map developers will love these map tiles – so they should be added to the Maps API.

In the game you have to follow clues and find the right locations. If you find the right location then when you click on the map the next clue will be revealed. If you find the game hard or get stuck then just click on the ‘spoiler’ link.


From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GoogleMapsMania/~3/duhKpJJDRFk/dragon-quest-with-8-bit-google-maps.html

Aerial Street View

Category: Google Maps | Apr 1, 2012


Google Sightseeing has discovered that Google has plans to release aerial Street View. They even have a sneak preview of some of the amazing images taken by Google’s Street View planes.

The Google Sightseeing team has also hacked together some of the aerial street view imagery using the Google Maps API which really gives a taste of what Sky View will look like when it is officially released by Google.

For plane fans there is also an intriguing photograph of the Sky View aircraft.


From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GoogleMapsMania/~3/6wDyxt__tbY/aerial-street-view.html

8-bit Google Maps Hacked

Category: Google Maps | Mar 31, 2012


At the risk of getting into all sorts of trouble I’ve hacked Google’s new 8-bit Google Maps April Fool.

8-bit Map uses the 8-Bit map tiles with the Google Maps API. I’ve added a few links beneath the map to showcase some of the landmarks Google have included around the world.

If Google allow map developers to use the map tiles then I’m sure we could see some awesome games built on top of the 8-bit map.


The new 8-bit map also has a number of characters from Dragon Warrior dotted around the world. Whilst I was in the hacking mood I therefore decided to put together an 8-bit Map – Dragon Warrior version of the hack as well.


From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GoogleMapsMania/~3/W7vBAUW3kYk/8-bit-google-maps-hacked.html

Google Maps Adds an 8-bit NES Button

Category: Google Maps | Mar 31, 2012

It is now April 1st in some parts of the world. That being so – we now have the best Google Maps April Fool ever – an NES button on Google Maps.

Go to Google Maps and use the Quest button and you can actually browse Google Maps as it would look on an 8-bit NES.

The map even has some great detail.

Check out Sydney Opera House, Alcatraz, Buckingham Palace, the Egyptian Pyramids or the Eiffel Tower.

There is even an 8-bit version of Street View!


From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GoogleMapsMania/~3/Me-6FB5ymZg/google-maps-adds-8-bit-nes-button.html

A World of Tweets on Google Maps

Category: Google Maps | Mar 31, 2012


GlobalTweets is a Google Map and timeline of Twitter messages.

GlobalTweets allows users to search the Twitter messages shown on the map or filter the results by the type of Tweet. The Tweets can be viewed as individual messages or as a heat map, so it is possible to gauge the extent of Twitter activity at different locations around the world.

The latest Tweets are also displayed in the timeline beneath the map. It is possible to translate, reply or retweet any of the messages on the map.

Hat-tip: Street View Funny


From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GoogleMapsMania/~3/rvSYSqR2i3E/world-of-tweets-on-google-maps.html

N Korean Rocket Debris on Google Maps

Category: Google Maps | Mar 30, 2012


In April North Korea is planning to launch a rocket to put a satellite into orbit. Debris from the second stage of North Korea’s rocket is expected to fall just east of Luzon in the Philippines.

Philippines television network ABS-CBN has created a Google Map to show where the debris from the rocket is likely to fall.

Accompanying the map is information about where debris from the first stage of the rocket is expected to land (in waters west of South Korea).

Hat-tip: Street View Funny


From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GoogleMapsMania/~3/q2ffJ-49TUI/n-korean-rocket-debris-on-google-maps.html

Mapping the Fonts of London

Category: Google Maps | Mar 30, 2012


London Typographica aims to photographically record publicly available lettering and type throughout London.

The London Typographica iPhone app allows users to take pictures of fonts that they find out on the streets of London and post them to a Google Map. The map itself is a wonderful guide to the fonts used in street signs, on shop-fronts and in graffiti around the capital city.

If you click on a map marker on the map the submitted photograph of a found font appears in the map sidebar.


From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GoogleMapsMania/~3/uGh42ZjmQSY/mapping-fonts-of-london.html

Create Your Own Fousquare Heat Maps

Category: Google Maps | Mar 29, 2012


In the Heat is a heat map creation tool for foursquare check-ins.

Using the application it is possible to create an animated heat map for foursquare check-ins at any location in the world. Creating a heat map is very simple it just require choosing a location and a venue category. It is possible to select from a number of venue categories, for example coffee, stations, nightlife.

In the Heat then creates a Google Map of your location. The map can be animated to view the number of check-ins through time at the venues shown in your map view. The map also comes with a slider control that allows the user to adjust the time displayed on the map.


From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GoogleMapsMania/~3/p4sBVwyjX7k/create-your-own-fousquare-heat-maps.html

The Real Heat Map of England

Category: Google Maps | Mar 29, 2012


The UK Department for Energy and Climate Change has released a real heat map for England. I say ‘real’ because it actually uses Google Maps to display heat use at building level throughout England.

The CEO – Heatmap shows heat demand from individual buildings throughout England and provides a range of tools to help developers and planners identify priority areas for low carbon heat projects.

The map was created using a bottom-up address level model of heat demand and does not use personal data (for example from individual household meter readings). It estimates the total heat demand of every address in England based on published sub-national energy consumption statistics.

The model seems very accurate. I notice in the streets around my location that the map shows much more energy consumption in blocks of flats than in individual homes.


From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GoogleMapsMania/~3/cpnEmHwSeRY/real-heat-map-of-england.html